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QuandoDio

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Is there a technical reason flannel isn’t used in suits more often?
Durability and not particularly crisp. Flannel ( original woolen flannel) isn't the most robust of fabrics. In fact, it can be rather fragile. Add in the fact that the trousers bags at the knees and it is overall slouchy and akin to wearing fancy PJs, some avoid it.

YMMV!
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Durability and not particularly crisp. Flannel ( original woolen flannel) isn't the most robust of fabrics. In fact, it can be rather fragile. Add in the fact that the trousers bags at the knees and it is overall slouchy and akin to wearing fancy PJs, some avoid it.

YMMV!
Flannel trousers with a twill weave are pretty robust. Grey flannels in winter are the way to go. But if you don't get them in twill you will likely get one season out of them. I like the slouchy drape and the air of Edward VIII all gone bad.
 
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QuandoDio

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Flannel trousers with a twill weave are pretty robust. Grey flannels in winter are the way to go. But if you don't get them in twill you will likely get one season out of them. I like the slouchy drape and the air of Edward VIII all gone bad.

I have a good number of flannel trews in several colours and a flannel suit or two so I have a decent perspective and obviously a fan. I dig the dégagé look. And I believe in colder seasons, few things feel better than being wrapped in flannel.

I disagree though - even in twills, it is not that durable. The three flannel trousers I have blown in the crotch, were twills. Two were RTW from Uncle Ralph and one was bespoke from Scabal ( lasted two wears)
 
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doghouse

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Durability and not particularly crisp. Flannel ( original woolen flannel) isn't the most robust of fabrics. In fact, it can be rather fragile. Add in the fact that the trousers bags at the knees and it is overall slouchy and akin to wearing fancy PJs, some avoid it.

YMMV!
Yeah, you have to actually be aiming for the slouchy look. Which has it's merits. A good DB flannel in the winter is quite louche.
 

Journeyman

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^Coincidentally, I'm wearing a pair of Carmina shell cordovan boots as I'm typing this.

I've got four pairs of Carmina shell boots and shoes and pair of calf leather shoes, and they're fine. I'd put them at C&J benchgrade level or thereabouts.

Apparently, the Inca last is made to a slightly higher standard than Carmina's other shoes, although I can't remember quite why. If they fit you and if you need a new pair of double-monk shoes, $300 sounds like a very good price.
 

Pauly Chase

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^Coincidentally, I'm wearing a pair of Carmina shell cordovan boots as I'm typing this.

I've got four pairs of Carmina shell boots and shoes and pair of calf leather shoes, and they're fine. I'd put them at C&J benchgrade level or thereabouts.

Apparently, the Inca last is made to a slightly higher standard than Carmina's other shoes, although I can't remember quite why. If they fit you and if you need a new pair of double-monk shoes, $300 sounds like a very good price.
I always want a pair of double monks in chestnut colorway, and these are the ideal shade.

Shoes in question

 

Peak

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Note how easily I just upped my post count, which heretofore's been quite minuscule. At the expense of Mr. Chase I realize, but posting is a cruel business.
 

MES

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Duffle coats - are they better at the classic length and boxy fit, or slightly trimmer? They seem to be really unpopular and expensive new so I'll probably have to find some vintage one and blast it with moth killer.
 

sirloin

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Classic fit and length is the best. Remember you have to be able to wear it over a jacket or thick sweater, and still move freely while commanding your troops when hunting down nazis.

 

Lobbster

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Duffle coats - are they better at the classic length and boxy fit, or slightly trimmer? They seem to be really unpopular and expensive new so I'll probably have to find some vintage one and blast it with moth killer.
Go on eBay and look for older ones by Polo Ralph Lauren or Gloverall, maybe Burberry. They come at decent prices but can run a little large so check the measurements. Give it a proper dry cleaning and you should be fine. If you're in Europe you can look for a German brand called Ladage & Oelke. They aren't cheap, over 600€ at retail, but the quality is very good and they are quite renowned and pride themselves for their models. They do come in long and short sizes so again check the measurements as they can rune a little large.

To me they look better when they are a little on the larger side and reach down to your knees . Check this photo of Fox Brothers' Douglas Cordeaux, made by Ladage and Oelke. https://www.instagram.com/p/BcsO45lhx3C/?taken-by=mart_josef

Ignore crap like Spier and Mackey. A duffle coat only has toggels and no zips.
 

Dropbear

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How would you rate the versatility of a camel hair sports coat over tweeds and herringbones? I know some people refer to it as an essential basic, but it can sometimes look plain and just too conservative.
 

Thruth

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How would you rate the versatility of a camel hair sports coat over tweeds and herringbones? I know some people refer to it as an essential basic, but it can sometimes look plain and just too conservative.
The fabrics work together no problem. But the problem is the camelhair working with people's colouring. That light a colour often does not work for many people.
 
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