Famous People Who Died

Jan Libourel

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^I worked with the Mongoose during the entirety of my 11 1/2 years as editor of Gun World. He was an ad salesman for Drag Racer, which was in the same stable of publications as Gun World. Nice guy. He and I were usually in sort of a de facto competition for who had the messiest office in the company. Judging from old photos, he was a fine specimen of manhood in his glory days, but like many ex-athletes, he had let himself go and had become very corpulent by the time I met him. I was mildly surprised that he made it to 81. On balance, I fear he had a pretty sad life.
 

Jan Libourel

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By "...a lot of right wing people" you mean you, right?
Only jocularly. Although I didn't agree with many of his policies, I thought he was a cautious, deliberative, thoughtful man who remained untouched by personal scandal--not bad qualities in a president. I definitely thought he was better than his predecessor.
 

Jan Libourel

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^Yeah, I was going to mention Koko, but you beat me to it. It is interesting that those signing chimps that attracted so much attention in the '70s ("It shows humanity is not unique," etc.), when they matured into adult chimps, became, well, adult chimps, i.e., very dangerous wild animals. As the late Vicki Hearne commented, for all the intelligence of the chimps and despite the breakthroughs in communications with them, we could not impart to them what we take for granted in the far less intelligent dog and the vastly less intelligent horse: that their lives would be much better if they refrained from attacking humans. Koko, on the other hand, seems to have remained gentle and peaceful throughout her life. I think this may be a reflection of female gorilla temperament in the wild. In the old days, when native tribes hunted gorilla family groups for food, the natives reported that the females did nothing to protect themselves and could be killed with ease.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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^Yeah, I was going to mention Koko, but you beat me to it. It is interesting that those signing chimps that attracted so much attention in the '70s ("It shows humanity is not unique," etc.), when they matured into adult chimps, became, well, adult chimps, i.e., very dangerous wild animals. As the late Vicki Hearne commented, for all the intelligence of the chimps and despite the breakthroughs in communications with them, we could not impart to them what we take for granted in the far less intelligent dog and the vastly less intelligent horse: that their lives would be much better if they refrained from attacking humans. Koko, on the other hand, seems to have remained gentle and peaceful throughout her life. I think this may be a reflection of female gorilla temperament in the wild. In the old days, when native tribes hunted gorilla family groups for food, the natives reported that the females did nothing to protect themselves and could be killed with ease.
Fascinating, but unlike the female grizzly bear with cubs that you accidently stumble across in the forest....

I can remember when Peter Gabriel was making music with chimpanzees, the album never was released.
 

Jan Libourel

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I see that Charles Krauthammer kicked the bucket yesterday. Brilliant guy, I guess, and a fellow Balliol man, but I never much cared for his point of view. Too much of a neocon for me even though I consider myself a man of the Right (mostly).
 

Jan Libourel

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Sci-Fi author Harlan Ellison has gone under. A very nasty man by most accounts. I know I sometimes get accused of misogyny in forumland, but this guy really lived it, going out of his way to belittle and humiliate women...or so I've heard.

He was also very anti-gun. In one op-ed piece he wrote for the L.A. Times years ago, he referred to gun fanciers as "the gun babies." Wow, with such mordant wit, I guess he really put us in our place! Yet he also used guns to intimidate people...go figure!

I'm not a fan of Sci-Fi, so I don't recall having read anything by him, which I don't count as a great loss.
 

Jan Libourel

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Another "notable" (I guess you could say) who finally died for keeps was Jahi McMath. You may recall the story: She was a 13 year old girl who had her tonsils and some other tissue removed to correct sleep apnea. Something went wrong, and she was pronounced brain-dead. The doctors asked for permission to harvest her organs, but her mother rejected this and kept her body in a moribund (I guess you could call it) state--not quite totally dead, not really alive either for the next 5 1/2 years. There was a lengthy article on this business not too long ago in The New Yorker. The whole business struck me as horribly creepy. "The Living Dead" should be reserved for horror movies, not the real world in my opinion. I know her mother was supported in this by some Christian groups, yet I don't know about the theology of this. If one takes the popular view that the soul leaves the body at the time of death, would Jahi's soul have been trapped in an insentient, unresponsive body for 5 1/2 years or would it already have taken leave? If there is anything to that business, I certainly hope the latter.
 

formby

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Sci-Fi author Harlan Ellison has gone under. A very nasty man by most accounts. I know I sometimes get accused of misogyny in forumland, but this guy really lived it, going out of his way to belittle and humiliate women...or so I've heard.

He was also very anti-gun. In one op-ed piece he wrote for the L.A. Times years ago, he referred to gun fanciers as "the gun babies." Wow, with such mordant wit, I guess he really put us in our place! Yet he also used guns to intimidate people...go figure!

I'm not a fan of Sci-Fi, so I don't recall having read anything by him, which I don't count as a great loss.
There's a bit Elmer Gantry in every Moraliser.
 

Jan Libourel

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John McCain bought it, I see. An "American hero" who was tortured by the cruel North Vietnamese while imprisoned, so the story goes. It so happens that my best friend has a fraternity brother who was two cells down from McCain in the "Hanoi Hilton." According to him, McCain was never tortured. It was all BS! McCain was injured when his plane crashed, and he was beaten up when he was captured, but he was never tortured after that. When he got back, he was something of a cad to his first wife, as I recall the story, ditching her for a much prettier, richer and younger number.
 

Fwiffo

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That was pretty quick for McCain. News broke he stopped treatment not more than a day ago. Apparently the President is not invited to the funeral.
 

InstaHate

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Another "notable" (I guess you could say) who finally died for keeps was Jahi McMath. You may recall the story: She was a 13 year old girl who had her tonsils and some other tissue removed to correct sleep apnea. Something went wrong, and she was pronounced brain-dead. The doctors asked for permission to harvest her organs, but her mother rejected this and kept her body in a moribund (I guess you could call it) state--not quite totally dead, not really alive either for the next 5 1/2 years. There was a lengthy article on this business not too long ago in The New Yorker. The whole business struck me as horribly creepy. "The Living Dead" should be reserved for horror movies, not the real world in my opinion. I know her mother was supported in this by some Christian groups, yet I don't know about the theology of this. If one takes the popular view that the soul leaves the body at the time of death, would Jahi's soul have been trapped in an insentient, unresponsive body for 5 1/2 years or would it already have taken leave? If there is anything to that business, I certainly hope the latter.
An ex-girlfriend of mine did some sort of psychiatric residency or something working with Alzheimer’s patients. She stopped believing in the soul and subsequently lost her faith. She couldn’t reconcile the existence of the soul with dementia. If the soul was the essence of a person, how could it vanish piecemeal? or be there one day or absent the next?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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John McCain bought it, I see. An "American hero" who was tortured by the cruel North Vietnamese while imprisoned, so the story goes. It so happens that my best friend has a fraternity brother who was two cells down from McCain in the "Hanoi Hilton." According to him, McCain was never tortured. It was all BS! McCain was injured when his plane crashed, and he was beaten up when he was captured, but he was never tortured after that. When he got back, he was something of a cad to his first wife, as I recall the story, ditching her for a much prettier, richer and younger number.
You can't knock his war or POW record and plenty came back to find their wives didn't understand them and things were not the same:


An ex-girlfriend of mine did some sort of psychiatric residency or something working with Alzheimer’s patients. She stopped believing in the soul and subsequently lost her faith. She couldn’t reconcile the existence of the soul with dementia. If the soul was the essence of a person, how could it vanish piecemeal? or be there one day or absent the next?
That's because the soul starts evacuating the body in stages, it doesn't necessarily leave in one cataclysmic and sheer moment of death. if only I had spoken to her, she'd be keeping the faith now.
 

Jan Libourel

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Ah, yes, "the Bandit." I am reminded of mentioning to our art director at Guns & Ammo that I had just seen the movie "Southern Comfort"--a grim and sanguinary tale about a group of National Guardsmen who get into a lethal imbroglio with some Cajuns in the swamps of Louisiana. She asked if it were anything like "Smokey and the Bandit." I replied, "No, it was nothing like 'Smokey and the Bandit'!"
 

Thruth

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Ashamed to say I never watched a movie of his, if you could list 2 or 3 films of his worth watching?
In addition to the ones already mentioned:

The Longest Yard - super flick. must have seen it a dozen times. His-to-ree.
White Lightning - 70's American south white trash seeks revenge out of prison for the killing of his brother
Hustle - good film noire
The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing - Burt makes a good cowboy
Boogie Nights - he does a great job as the aging porn director
 

Rambo

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In addition to the ones already mentioned:

The Longest Yard - super flick. must have seen it a dozen times. His-to-ree.
White Lightning - 70's American south white trash seeks revenge out of prison for the killing of his brother
Hustle - good film noire
The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing - Burt makes a good cowboy
Boogie Nights - he does a great job as the aging porn director
Yes

No love for Cannonball Run?
 
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