Pitti Uomo 93

rdiaz

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I used to wear my overcoat over my shoulders if I was not to walk a lot under the freezin cold.
Now I won't do it anymore.
Those fucking tackys, they break everything...
 

TheUntermensch

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Was ever such a huge selection of absolute thundercunts gathered in one place before.
Bony ankles, large thighs, and crotches. That's Pitti for you. This forum is famous for its expertise (oh yes, don't be modest) on patterns, cuts, and proportions. The proportions of the modern iGent are identical to the hipster aesthetic: trousers tight at the ankle, and cut rather short, a collection of junk around the wrists, hats and sunglasses with no function at all, and a curious stoop. Not very many of the Pitti visitors hold themselves like gentlemen, and most of them are very self-conscious. You can tell by the posture.
 

Jan Libourel

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I have long argued with family and friends that a fondness for fine menswear and turning oneself out well is not the mark of the ghey boy (not necessarily anyway). These Pitti clowns make that position much more difficult to maintain!
 

The Shooman

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formby

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I have long argued with family and friends that a fondness for fine menswear and turning oneself out well is not the mark of the ghey boy (not necessarily anyway). These Pitti clowns make that position much more difficult to maintain!
Many men in the US seem to have a real problem with male flamboyancy. Which I find odd, given that it gave the world Disco.

I've always found American notions of 'male authenticity', 'manly men' and that whole thing of hyper-masculinity incredibly camp.

As Gore Vidal once quipped. Ernest Hemingway was a joke, that only Americans didn't get.
 

Lumpen

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The same idiots over and over...

This biannual ( bi-anal-curious) threads would end faster with this question:

Post if find any correctly dressed.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Many men in the US seem to have a real problem with male flamboyancy. Which I find odd, given that it gave the world Disco..

I've always found American notions of 'male authenticity', 'manly men' and that whole thing of hyper-masculinity incredibly camp..
Certainly Americans are more into their technicolor ties on beaming white shirts than the Brits. That would be considered quite effete from an English perspective.


As Gore Vidal once quipped. Ernest Hemingway was a joke, that only Americans didn't get.
Hemmingway's prose style was immaculate: nothing peacock there, no verbose or unnecassary adjectives or adverbs. Hyperbole be damned! He wrote the best love story for men that I know of, that's some feat. Still, Gore Vidal had the best pad in his cliffhanging villa in Amalfi.
 

TheUntermensch

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Hemmingway's prose style was immaculate: nothing peacock there, no verbose or unnecassary adjectives or adverbs. Hyperbole be damned!
Tosh and nonsense. Hemingway is just the butch version of Truman Capote: a mediocre journalist elevated to the altar of Writing, born and bred in privilege, and famous for being famous.

That being said, his is one of the few examples of a proper beard (since we mentioned Pitti, what?). The others being Tsar Nicholas II, George V, Prince Michael of Kent, Ernest Shackleton, and Oliver Reed.
 

CesareRomiti

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Tosh and nonsense. Hemingway is just the butch version of Truman Capote: a mediocre journalist elevated to the altar of Writing, born and bred in privilege, and famous for being famous.

That being said, his is one of the few examples of a proper beard (since we mentioned Pitti, what?). The others being Tsar Nicholas II, George V, Prince Michael of Kent, Ernest Shackleton, and Oliver Reed.
Best beard =
David niven


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Jan Libourel

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I've always found American notions of 'male authenticity', 'manly men' and that whole thing of hyper-masculinity incredibly camp.
I should scarcely find this a peculiarly American thing. Certainly, in 19th century and early 20th century British literature, someone's being "manly" or "all man" was a recurrent theme. In the Latin world, I think there is much more emphasis on "machismo" or being "muy hombre" than in the Anglo-Saxon countries. In old Scandinavia calling another man a "woman" was a mortal insult, literally. And let's not get started on many Muslim peoples, although bisexuality is often regnant among them. If anything, I fear that American men have been largely castrated by decades of feminist dogma imposed on them in the schools--and by young women infused with the notions that anything a man can do, they can do, as well or better. Then, of course, there are the legions of kick-ass warrior women in popular entertainment, the admission of women into combat military units and line police duty, etc. I could go on, but why bother....
 
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