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Thruth

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FLA isn't Florida? how? Hispanic people are Aryan? That's a stretch for most logical brains.
Work with me here Fwiffo Fwiffo . Stop worrying about ISIS & North Korean nukes.

FLA = a part of America = America is the hotbed of Neo-Nazism

Leit leaves a classless Venezuela for America -which was classless even before Chavez - and becomes enamoured by alt-conservatism because it stokes his hatred at the socialists who destroyed his idyllic land.

It made sense because to him, the left was evil. Nazis hated socialists, communists and fascists. What else could he become in America?
 

Lord Buckley

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not necessarily job related but have any of you guys ever run into a coworker or peer that has their own name as an email domain? E.G. his name is Bob Jones and the email on his card is contactme@bobjones.org or some such thing.

I ask because I need a new personal email but gmail is out of combos for my name, yet somehow having my own name as a domain seems both silly and pretentious when I think about it.
Never, for me I would consider it slightly pretentious, but not enough for it to worry me much.

The issue I have, are Brits who use completely different names on their email to their real one. This is quite common in my industry for those who work extensively on projects abroad and are not registered in any known state, or include addresses in Saudi Arabia for their tax purposes. These are always the same types: offshore bank accounts, boasting about their Seaman's Passport (but always work onshore) and on how they don't pay tax ever for anyone. I always throw their CV's straight in the bin.
 

Fwiffo

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Leit leaves a classless Venezuela for America -which was classless even before Chavez - and becomes enamoured by alt-conservatism because it stokes his hatred at the socialists who destroyed his idyllic land.

It made sense because to him, the left was evil. Nazis hated socialists, communists and fascists. What else could he become in America?
Isn't he a little bit tanned to be carrying torches with those white guys in Charlottesville?
 

Fwiffo

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There's an address from our head office where attendance is restricted to full time employees people onsite. No remote teleconference or video conference - you must be here. Two of my directs decide instead of figuring out where our division and firm will go in the future, I'm going to take a vacation. Baffling.
 

Fwiffo

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The fact that my mid year review was delayed by one quarter meant I thought it was of little to no significance. In fact my very detailed reply and metrics were frozen as of the beginning of July. I never bothered given the constant delays to go back and update them.

Finally in the last week of September, the sit down happens. I said something to the effect of, "I'm not even sure I can even reply given my duties and responsibilities in this organization to the question of why I should still be employed should the new C officer at head office representing our division ask me."

My boss told me I'm a get the stuff done person.

I then told him about an exec who joined from my old firm and how I was able to be customer facing, help his department grow, clean up his vendor spending, do all sorts of things to help the firm succeed and now all I can offer him is to push paper to the top of the pile.

I should have just bit my tongue and let it go but I decided to be candid for zero gain knowing before I spoke I wouldn't gain. Should have been more disciplined. After all my bosses have all been on secondments and when this one ends, they're on a business class flight back to the fatherland.
 

Dropbear

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I made the jump from NGO to state government at the start of this year and it was the single best career move I have ever made.

The money was a little better, plus they are very generous with leave and an old fashioned pension scheme. I was concerned about going from a management position back to a non-management position, but now I have done it it really does still feel like an upward move. The training and development opportunities are amazing. I work hard for forty hours a week and that's it - no stress or work follows me home. The exception is during a major disaster like we just had - during which I get paid overtime just like an hourly employee!!

Once I am done soaking up all the training and experience I can move on to better money in City and County government. My boss want me to take his job when he retires, so that's another option.
 

Fwiffo

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Once I am done soaking up all the training and experience I can move on to better money in City and County government. My boss want me to take his job when he retires, so that's another option.
Doesn't better money usually mean more stress? I thought you moved to your individual contributor role to get away from the stress.
 

Dropbear

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Doesn't better money usually mean more stress? I thought you moved to your individual contributor role to get away from the stress.
To my surprise, not always. I’d say NGO to Govt will almost always be significantly less stress. Also joining a better team with good support helps.

And I’m very good with short intense high stress periods - goes with the territory, working bioterror emergency response management. Even managing this recent hurricane response, I got a lot of praise for being cool and calm in the crisis. What I learned is that I am not so good with the never ending 24/7 lower level stress. That ongoing ulserating no sleep stuff just eats away at your quality of life.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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To my surprise, not always. I’d say NGO to Govt will almost always be significantly less stress. Also joining a better team with good support helps.

And I’m very good with short intense high stress periods - goes with the territory, working bioterror emergency response management. Even managing this recent hurricane response, I got a lot of praise for being cool and calm in the crisis. What I learned is that I am not so good with the never ending 24/7 lower level stress. That ongoing ulserating no sleep stuff just eats away at your quality of life.
I agree: a nice cushy NGO, Government body or quango can do wonders for your bank balance for very little stress or responsibility. Strategic positions can be excellent too, by the time they've realised you've messed-up it's 12 years down the line and you're well gone.

I looked at getting into crisis management about 20 years ago, but I thought I was muscling in on patches best served by ex-military, so I let it go.
 

Dropbear

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I looked at getting into crisis management about 20 years ago, but I thought I was muscling in on patches best served by ex-military, so I let it go.
We are mostly ex-defence force with a smattering of former cops and paramedics who have worked their way up. I feel sorry for people who do an MPH or emergency management masters without that background, hoping to land a job.

ALSO: Why TF doesn't Linkdin have a Print a Resume option? I usually remember to add certifications and note-worthy committee membership type stuff to my profile there instead of updating a word document resume. I would actually pay a few bucks if they would then take that information and format it into a nice looking paper resume to bring along to interviews.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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We are mostly ex-defence force with a smattering of former cops and paramedics who have worked their way up. I feel sorry for people who do an MPH or emergency management masters without that background, hoping to land a job.

ALSO: Why TF doesn't Linkdin have a Print a Resume option? I usually remember to add certifications and note-worthy committee membership type stuff to my profile there instead of updating a word document resume. I would actually pay a few bucks if they would then take that information and format it into a nice looking paper resume to bring along to interviews.
Aye, you wouldn't want a myopic suburban street punk like me messing things up at a tactical level. A friend of mine did a special UN MBA for people who, er yes, wanted to work for the UN. But unless you have connections you will not be invited to the party. As they all find out sooner or later.

Be very wary of LinkedIn, all the scammers are getting your details off there, particularly chains of command. Then they send the email from to Accounts pretending to be the CEO who needs an urgent transfer to close the deal.
 

Fwiffo

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By the end of next year, for this 16 person team I inherited in 2013, I will have terminated 100% of the contractors and 60% of the full time positions. There's only 2 people left from the original team.
 

Fwiffo

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Should I accept a LinkedIn request from a tire and battery technician at a garage chain?

I reckon this is a slight improvement on the other chap who worked the grocery till.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Should I accept a LinkedIn request from a tire and battery technician at a garage chain?

I reckon this is a slight improvement on the other chap who worked the grocery till.
If you use his services, yes. Be wary of the ultra fit babes from head hunting companies you've never heard of, they're all scams.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Alas I don't own a vehicle. Why do you think people like that add me? I reckon I sound like a snob now.
No, you sound like someone who doesn't own a car. It certainly doesn't make you a snob and when it comes to leaving town quickly and getting across a number of states and borders quickly....
 

Fwiffo

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The Executive Who Wants to Revolutionize Your Work Life

"WeWork is working to create a world where people make a life and not just a living. Thirty years ago there was a certain expectation of what a young adult would do when they went to college and graduated. Today everything has opened up. We’re observing a large generation of amazing individuals being interested in intention and meaning more than material goods. And their workplaces are based on mission and fulfillment–not only salary."

I'm sure good intention and fulfillment of one's mission puts food on the table too. There's always food stamps and the food bank if you don't quite make it.

"You graduated college this year, more than a decade late. Is getting a college degree important?

Finishing what you started is important. My grandmother paid for it, and it was important to her that I finish. This year I did my last class, and I got to graduate and give the [commencement] speech both in the same hour. People need to study–we’re students for life. But do I think the traditional way works? No way. Most people finishing college at 22 aren’t even trained for a profession. What have they done the past four years?"

No one said getting an undergrad degree at 22 meant you're adept at any profession. It just means you went into academia, figured out their contrived rules, and you left there in four years with a badge of honour to mark your success and some battle scars. It means that no matter what organizational life you go into whether it's the Ndrangheta crime syndicate, or political officer for the North Korean regime, or managing the natives in an Anglo-American mine in Africa, you can figure out what the constraints are, chart a course to success and have the perseverance and fortitude to stay the course and see it through - no matter how painful, how far way the goal seems to be or how it bloody affects your personal sensibilities because it's your job and you have to do it to survive. That's what the four years taught you.

Sometimes it's not about doing something because there's direct and immediate gratification. Sometimes you do something because at the end of it, on the side, or as a next step, you eventually get what you want.
 

prince nez

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The Executive Who Wants to Revolutionize Your Work Life

"WeWork is working to create a world where people make a life and not just a living. Thirty years ago there was a certain expectation of what a young adult would do when they went to college and graduated. Today everything has opened up. We’re observing a large generation of amazing individuals being interested in intention and meaning more than material goods. And their workplaces are based on mission and fulfillment–not only salary."

I'm sure good intention and fulfillment of one's mission puts food on the table too. There's always food stamps and the food bank if you don't quite make it.

"You graduated college this year, more than a decade late. Is getting a college degree important?

Finishing what you started is important. My grandmother paid for it, and it was important to her that I finish. This year I did my last class, and I got to graduate and give the [commencement] speech both in the same hour. People need to study–we’re students for life. But do I think the traditional way works? No way. Most people finishing college at 22 aren’t even trained for a profession. What have they done the past four years?"

No one said getting an undergrad degree at 22 meant you're adept at any profession. It just means you went into academia, figured out their contrived rules, and you left there in four years with a badge of honour to mark your success and some battle scars. It means that no matter what organizational life you go into whether it's the Ndrangheta crime syndicate, or political officer for the North Korean regime, or managing the natives in an Anglo-American mine in Africa, you can figure out what the constraints are, chart a course to success and have the perseverance and fortitude to stay the course and see it through - no matter how painful, how far way the goal seems to be or how it bloody affects your personal sensibilities because it's your job and you have to do it to survive. That's what the four years taught you.

Sometimes it's not about doing something because there's direct and immediate gratification. Sometimes you do something because at the end of it, on the side, or as a next step, you eventually get what you want.
As an old boss once told me: ‘sometimes you have to go sideways now to go forwards later’.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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The Executive Who Wants to Revolutionize Your Work Life

"WeWork is working to create a world where people make a life and not just a living. Thirty years ago there was a certain expectation of what a young adult would do when they went to college and graduated. Today everything has opened up. We’re observing a large generation of amazing individuals being interested in intention and meaning more than material goods. And their workplaces are based on mission and fulfillment–not only salary."

I'm sure good intention and fulfillment of one's mission puts food on the table too. There's always food stamps and the food bank if you don't quite make it.

"You graduated college this year, more than a decade late. Is getting a college degree important?

Finishing what you started is important. My grandmother paid for it, and it was important to her that I finish. This year I did my last class, and I got to graduate and give the [commencement] speech both in the same hour. People need to study–we’re students for life. But do I think the traditional way works? No way. Most people finishing college at 22 aren’t even trained for a profession. What have they done the past four years?"

No one said getting an undergrad degree at 22 meant you're adept at any profession. It just means you went into academia, figured out their contrived rules, and you left there in four years with a badge of honour to mark your success and some battle scars. It means that no matter what organizational life you go into whether it's the Ndrangheta crime syndicate, or political officer for the North Korean regime, or managing the natives in an Anglo-American mine in Africa, you can figure out what the constraints are, chart a course to success and have the perseverance and fortitude to stay the course and see it through - no matter how painful, how far way the goal seems to be or how it bloody affects your personal sensibilities because it's your job and you have to do it to survive. That's what the four years taught you.

Sometimes it's not about doing something because there's direct and immediate gratification. Sometimes you do something because at the end of it, on the side, or as a next step, you eventually get what you want.
A lot depends on the quality of the degree: what is it in, where is it from, whether it is vocational, etc.

Back in my youth it was bestowed upon us that having a degree in anything, form any institution meant the world was your oyster. My father never forgave me that I wasn't a manager and on a fast track route to being CEO at age 22.

Any big corporation you need a degree to get ahead, otherwise there will be very clear limits to your career.

A lot of industries are better served by licenses and qualifications earned during a mixture of work, night school and short courses. Indeed, for many professions this the ideal.
 

formby

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A lot depends on the quality of the degree: what is it in, where is it from, whether it is vocational, etc.

Back in my youth it was bestowed upon us that having a degree in anything, form any institution meant the world was your oyster. My father never forgave me that I wasn't a manager and on a fast track route to being CEO at age 22.

Any big corporation you need a degree to get ahead, otherwise there will be very clear limits to your career.

A lot of industries are better served by licenses and qualifications earned during a mixture of work, night school and short courses. Indeed, for many professions this the ideal.
Aye, but its worth remembering that when we were young there weren't that many graduates, and it was a lot harder to get into university because the A-levels were much harder than they are now.
They dumbed down the curriculum and changed the way they awarded the grades. Every fucka has 3 A's now.
 

The Shooman

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Aye, but its worth remembering that when we were young there weren't that many graduates, and it was a lot harder to get into university because the A-levels were much harder than they are now.
They dumbed down the curriculum and changed the way they awarded the grades. Every fucka has 3 A's now.

Yep, it was much harder to get top marks in the old days, and people who got the top marks were few and often quite capable. These days everyone seems to get top marks, but so many seem to be dummies. Far fewer ever went to university in the old days, and most who did completed the bachelors and that was it. Now every man and his dog has a masters and many are doing PhD's, but for what? Has all this made the society better?..are people better off?..are people smarter?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Aye, but its worth remembering that when we were young there weren't that many graduates, and it was a lot harder to get into university because the A-levels were much harder than they are now.
They dumbed down the curriculum and changed the way they awarded the grades. Every fucka has 3 A's now.
That much is true, all part and parcel of equitable outcomes regardless of academic prowess or rigour of intellect.

I remember my History A Level, the questions were deliberately shrouded in archaic abd verbose language to confuse you so you would answer with a wrong essay. As one of my younger colleagues told me, that today, the examiners wouldn't get away with that because of the Plain English Campaign.
 

Fwiffo

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My division will be restructured on Monday.
I have little hope it will change my fortune. I'm concerned about my title and being put to do the exact same thing with a demotion and possibly a smaller piece of the empire.

My original plan was to hang on after doing my industry conference presentation at the end of February - build some connections with the industry peers in attendance and land a new job this year. Maybe even impress a C level executive.

Today I heard my Canadian division boss will retire. He's a bit young to retire at less than 60. I don't know if this was a casualty of the reorganisation. He was the man who hired me before he was promoted. He promoted me to Director. I did good work for him, but I have a reputation at work. His presence works for me some ways, but it works against my advancement in others.

I have no hope of leapfrogging my current boss. All I can hope is my boss moves up or laterally to free up a spot for me. I've been in this situation for three years and every time Germany sends over someone or I'm cursed because of my reputation. Do I want to hang on until I make eight years here to see if I have a chance?
 

Rambo

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Do I want to hang on until I make eight years here to see if I have a chance?
what happens at 8 years?

if you don't hang on, what are you interested in doing? you've repeatedly said insurance is a dying industry and jobs like yours have gone the way of the dodo.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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My division will be restructured on Monday.
I have little hope it will change my fortune. I'm concerned about my title and being put to do the exact same thing with a demotion and possibly a smaller piece of the empire.

My original plan was to hang on after doing my industry conference presentation at the end of February - build some connections with the industry peers in attendance and land a new job this year. Maybe even impress a C level executive.

Today I heard my Canadian division boss will retire. He's a bit young to retire at less than 60. I don't know if this was a casualty of the reorganisation. He was the man who hired me before he was promoted. He promoted me to Director. I did good work for him, but I have a reputation at work. His presence works for me some ways, but it works against my advancement in others.

I have no hope of leapfrogging my current boss. All I can hope is my boss moves up or laterally to free up a spot for me. I've been in this situation for three years and every time Germany sends over someone or I'm cursed because of my reputation. Do I want to hang on until I make eight years here to see if I have a chance?
One of our clients has recently been taken over, the new CEO is a hard hitter and known for turning these massive organisations around, the first action he takes is to eliminate the incumbent management, including middle management. They must be feeling somewhat twitchy there are the moment. I can see their office from mine, I'm keeping a close eye on any potential jumpers.

what happens at 8 years?

if you don't hang on, what are you interested in doing? you've repeatedly said insurance is a dying industry and jobs like yours have gone the way of the dodo.
How can insurance be dying? Reminds me of my nephew who's just graduated as an Accountant. He's come out with near enough 100 grand in debt, SJW neo-marxist ideals and a belief that all the new accounts software means that the Accounts discipline is a dead artform.
 

Fwiffo

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what happens at 8 years?

if you don't hang on, what are you interested in doing? you've repeatedly said insurance is a dying industry and jobs like yours have gone the way of the dodo.
Nothing happens at eight years. It will be that I've been eight years at this firm. I was at eight and a half years at the previous firm. For me it's a bit of a milestone. My next milestone is ten years here. I believe I get one extra week of vacation. However the retention bonus and the pin for your jacket have all been discarded as a result of cost cutting.

My first preference is staying in insurance. As I always maintain, the pressure is low and the pay is relatively high. I'm 50/50 open to relocation but I don't have much interest working in the US or Western Europe as I've done that before.

Is insurance a dying industry? I don't think we're dying. Some lines of businesses will die like personal and fleet automobiles when autonomous driving takes over. Climate change is making all kinds of disasters that will lead to new coverage. Identity protection and cyber threats offer another avenue. If we can't lure you with our marketing, we will lobby the government to make it mandatory (tenant's insurance, automobile insurance).

I've been posting articles about the disappearance of white collar full time jobs with a pension but that's in general. Is our industry changing from boozing all day and underwriting on a napkin having a pint in the City? Yes, but not by that much.
 

Fwiffo

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One of our clients has recently been taken over, the new CEO is a hard hitter and known for turning these massive organisations around, the first action he takes is to eliminate the incumbent management, including middle management. They must be feeling somewhat twitchy there are the moment. I can see their office from mine, I'm keeping a close eye on any potential jumpers.
Our CEO was promoted from within. The CxO was brought from the outside a year after. I'm not sure much will happen to middle management other than I may get some other team or department to manage with a recalibration of my title. This is one of the reasons I don't fancy getting a corner office. I don't want to be so high up in the hierarchy that I would get swept away by regime change.
 

doghouse

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Then think of insurance as a peace of mind and managing your risk.

Or see it for what it is you need it like you need a licence to operate your heavy machinery otherwise it violates a law.
Yeah, we don't need a license thankfully.

I'm tired of turning down terrorist coverage and internet whatever. Two more signatures are just too much.
 

Fwiffo

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Yeah, we don't need a license thankfully.

I'm tired of turning down terrorist coverage and internet whatever. Two more signatures are just too much.
You know we don't even make money off the premiums you send over. The premiums received are invested and those investments generate a return on investment which generate profit for the company. The premium (money in) versus claim (money out) surplus is just used to pay for toilet paper, drinks, dinners and entertainment.
 
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