Journeyman

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This is the Seiko chrono with the 30% discount down from 3 grand:
For me, like a lot of Seiko models, it's close but not close enough - there are a couple of niggling, off-putting details.

Why have one, odd-coloured subdial? Why not have all three subdials the same colour?

Also, I don't like date windows at 4 o'clock, and I really don't like little, round date windows at 4 o'clock.
 

Great White Snark

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For me, like a lot of Seiko models, it's close but not close enough - there are a couple of niggling, off-putting details.

Why have one, odd-coloured subdial? Why not have all three subdials the same colour?

Also, I don't like date windows at 4 o'clock, and I really don't like little, round date windows at 4 o'clock.
Fair comments.
I suppose the black trim denotes the chrono functions (tachy scale for seconds hand, minute and hour counters, while the silver main dial and sub dial seconds remain silver for standard time, but I agree it looks weird. Some people don’t even like the idea of any date on a chrono, but it’s hard to place it among three sub dials without looking like a squeezed in afterthought.
 

Kingstonian

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Well if you're not that bothered about watches, then why not.
Even if you are bothered, a Quartz Seiko is accurate and reliable and many of their pieces look good.

You might not get expensive Japanese polishing on the case, or clever manual engineering that gets closer to quartz accuracy - but many are happy to just go with the latest technology anyway.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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For me, like a lot of Seiko models, it's close but not close enough - there are a couple of niggling, off-putting details.

Why have one, odd-coloured subdial? Why not have all three subdials the same colour?

Also, I don't like date windows at 4 o'clock, and I really don't like little, round date windows at 4 o'clock.
Can't argue against personal preference.

Even if you are bothered, a Quartz Seiko is accurate and reliable and many of their pieces look good.

You might not get expensive Japanese polishing on the case, or clever manual engineering that gets closer to quartz accuracy - but many are happy to just go with the latest technology anyway.
The zaratsu polishing is a bugger, as lacking diasheild coating, it scratches like a bugger.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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I'd punch a few G's higher and get a GS.
A GS chronograph is going to cost you about 11 grand plus. Daytona territory. You need to punch quite a few grand above that Seiko chronograph.

I like it, and definitely would buy it, if I wasn't locked into an expensive garden redesign including pod-cum-shed-barbecue-folly. Sadly, the one thing I want: a pond full of koi has been vetoed.

But I figure the overall costs of that Seiko will be a lot cheaper than the pond and the fish.

I need to strike when the moment is right.
 

formby001

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A GS chronograph is going to cost you about 11 grand plus. Daytona territory. You need to punch quite a few grand above that Seiko chronograph.

I like it, and definitely would buy it, if I wasn't locked into an expensive garden redesign including pod-cum-shed-barbecue-folly. Sadly, the one thing I want: a pond full of koi has been vetoed.

But I figure the overall costs of that Seiko will be a lot cheaper than the pond and the fish.

I need to strike when the moment is right.
If you like it, go for it... Fuck the missus and, fuck the Koi carp...[/QUOTE]
 

Journeyman

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Sadly, the one thing I want: a pond full of koi has been vetoed.
How would the carp fare over winter? Would you have to heat the pond? Or move the carp to a tank every winter?

Actually, I wonder how the carp survive in Japan, as ponds freeze over there, too.
 

formby001

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How would the carp fare over winter? Would you have to heat the pond? Or move the carp to a tank every winter?

Actually, I wonder how the carp survive in Japan, as ponds freeze over there, too.
Carp are bottom feeders and, very hardy.
 

Dropbear

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Watchheads: can you recommend a strap maker who does 19mm leather? Looking for something rugged, so no dainty alligators.
 

Dropbear

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you looking for a certainly style in particular?
Not really. The IWC metal bracelet I have now is very practical and fulfills both dress and sturdy casual/ sporting needs. I was just thinking about a change. Zulu and NATO might be too bulky, but I wouldn’t rule them out.
 

Rambo

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Not really. The IWC metal bracelet I have now is very practical and fulfills both dress and sturdy casual/ sporting needs. I was just thinking about a change. Zulu and NATO might be too bulky, but I wouldn’t rule them out.
So plain leather then? Its a pilot watch isnt it? You want to go with the dress watch strap?
 

formby002

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So plain leather then? Its a pilot watch isnt it? You want to go with the dress watch strap?
Shouldn't a Flyer have one of those chunky staps with the rivets and contrasting stitching? Or a NATO stylee strap...perhaps.
 

Dropbear

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So plain leather then? Its a pilot watch isnt it? You want to go with the dress watch strap?
I have a factory dress alligator strap and the metal bracelet. I was thinking something more rug



Shouldn't a Flyer have one of those chunky staps with the rivets and contrasting stitching? Or a NATO stylee strap...perhaps.

It’s an RAF watch. The rivets are a Luftwaffe thing, I think? Contrast stitching sounds alright.

I don’t mind NATO/Zulu straps, and on this watch the thickness of the double strap under the watch probably wouldn’t be so bad as on my monster Hamilton. My first reaction was that mixing an Air Force watch and army strap was wrong, but no more than a former RAAMC bloke wearing a RAF watch.
 

formby002

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I have a factory dress alligator strap and the metal bracelet. I was thinking something more rug






It’s an RAF watch. The rivets are a Luftwaffe thing, I think? Contrast stitching sounds alright.

I don’t mind NATO/Zulu straps, and on this watch the thickness of the double strap under the watch probably wouldn’t be so bad as on my monster Hamilton. My first reaction was that mixing an Air Force watch and army strap was wrong, but no more than a former RAAMC bloke wearing a RAF watch.
I wouldn't worry about rivets being a Luftwaffe/RAF thing, I think they look good on a flyer unless authenticity is what you're after...

A cuff strap would be a nice retro touch too...
 

Great White Snark

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I have a factory dress alligator strap and the metal bracelet. I was thinking something more rug






It’s an RAF watch. The rivets are a Luftwaffe thing, I think? Contrast stitching sounds alright.

I don’t mind NATO/Zulu straps, and on this watch the thickness of the double strap under the watch probably wouldn’t be so bad as on my monster Hamilton. My first reaction was that mixing an Air Force watch and army strap was wrong, but no more than a former RAAMC bloke wearing a RAF watch.
Despite naming one of their watches ‘Spitfire’ (damn cheek!) I thought IWC made watches for the bloody Bosche not the RAF?
 

Dropbear

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Despite naming one of their watches ‘Spitfire’ (damn cheek!) I thought IWC made watches for the bloody Bosche not the RAF?
pretty sure they were one of the ‘dirty dozen’ making WWW watches for the allies during WW2. The iwc mk11 serves the RAF from 1948 through to the mid-1980s.

Mine is actually a mkXV, so no military service but still sexy af.
 

Rambo

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I wouldn't worry about rivets being a Luftwaffe/RAF thing, I think they look good on a flyer unless authenticity is what you're after...

A cuff strap would be a nice retro touch too...
i agree with this. in my mind i always picture a pilot watch with a rivet strap.
 

Thruth

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Despite naming one of their watches ‘Spitfire’ (damn cheek!) I thought IWC made watches for the bloody Bosche not the RAF?

W.W.W. WATCH WRIST WATERPROOF FOR THE BRITISH ARMY (1945)
Caliber H/83, No official reference (Historical timepiece), First manufactured in 1945

The W.W.W (or watch, wrist, waterproof) is the most well-regarded of all the British Army watches by some margin. It is possible that this is because they were the first wrist watches specially designed for general British Army service. Prior to this, civilian wrist watches, which were not always suitable for requirements, were used. IWC were one of 12 companies supplying the British Army with the W.W.W. models, and by doing so, the business gained invaluable experience of dealing with the challenging specifications of the British authorities. Some 6,000 watches were made for the British Army in total and they were supplied to the UK from May to June 1945.

BIG PILOT’S WATCH (1940)
Caliber H/52 T.S.C., Reference IW431, First manufactured in 1940

The Big Pilot’s Watch was supplied to the Luftwaffe German Air Force in 1940 in an edition of 1,000 pieces. Constructed according to strict criteria for observation watches, it is the biggest wristwatch ever built by IWC, with a case diameter of 55 mm, a height of 16.5 mm, and a weight of 183 g.
 

Dropbear

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The metal bracelet isn’t the most attractive, but it’s a rare OEM and very practical. I’ve never even fitted the black alligator strap that came with it.


5FF7651B-1378-4A86-9FFB-E323D003F010.jpeg
 

Great White Snark

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pretty sure they were one of the ‘dirty dozen’ making WWW watches for the allies during WW2. The iwc mk11 serves the RAF from 1948 through to the mid-1980s.

Mine is actually a mkXV, so no military service but still sexy af.
I treat with suspicion these stories I hear about perennially frugal military issuing expensive name brand Swiss watches. Stories of the SAS getting Rolexes etc.- obviously it happened to some degree but I don’t believe it to be too widespread, especially in recent decades as prices have not her higher and higher. I was associated with some special forces and asked them about this. Most of them used basic G-Shocks!
 

formby002

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I treat with suspicion these stories I hear about perennially frugal military issuing expensive name brand Swiss watches. Stories of the SAS getting Rolexes etc.- obviously it happened to some degree but I don’t believe it to be too widespread, especially in recent decades as prices have not her higher and higher. I was associated with some special forces and asked them about this. Most of them used basic G-Shocks!
Rolex were common for British servicemen during WWII, especially officers, my maternal grandfather had one.

Rolex's original thing was well made tool watches for professionals. Mil-Subs, COMEX-Subs &c.

1594502110845.png
 
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Thruth

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I treat with suspicion these stories I hear about perennially frugal military issuing expensive name brand Swiss watches. Stories of the SAS getting Rolexes etc.- obviously it happened to some degree but I don’t believe it to be too widespread, especially in recent decades as prices have not her higher and higher. I was associated with some special forces and asked them about this. Most of them used basic G-Shocks!
well then you haven't been doing your research. The Canadian Navy (French navy too but they were stamped MN) used to issue Tudor MilSubs (had them in naval stores) sourced from Rolex Toronto. IDF had Eterna Kon Tikis. Blancpain, Lemania, Rolex, Omega, Heuer, Breguet.

With the advent of reduced budgets and the accuracy of quartz there was a shift.
 

Thruth

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Yeah understood ... and more recently?
do you fucking read what anyone actually writes?

"With the advent of reduced budgets and the accuracy of quartz there was a shift." What do you think the shift was towards?

Your point was something along the lines "oh I don't believe it was common then". Yes it was.

No one said it was common now.
 

Journeyman

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With the advent of reduced budgets and the accuracy of quartz there was a shift.
Yes - all of these "name brand" watches used by the military were 40 or more years ago.

I don't get the fetishisation of a) "patina" and b) military service watches, particularly by Rolex collectors. A "milsub" (ie military-issue Rolex Submariner) will usually sell for north of US$100,000 - sometimes multiples of that amount.

Of course, there's the (now) rarity value but ultimately, it's just a watch and it's not your, or your family's wear on the watch.
 
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