florisgreen

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I have two watches. This is my 1939 limited edition chronograph by Dan Henry:
View attachment 40326
It’s a replica of the watches US bomber plane crews used to wear in WW2. A solid chrono without anything too gimmicky.

The second one I got as a present for my 18th birthday:
View attachment 40328
This is my go-to watch 80% of the time. It’s from a respected Finnish watchmaker Leijona. It fits under a shirt cuff much better than a chronometre would.

Interesting pieces. Is the Finnish watch a mechanical one? I like the bracelet.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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I have two watches. This is my 1939 limited edition chronograph by Dan Henry:
View attachment 40326
It’s a replica of the watches US bomber plane crews used to wear in WW2. A solid chrono without anything too gimmicky.
Reminds me of the Omega 1945 Officer's watch which was released as one of the museum series about 15 years ago now:

Omega-Officers-Watch-Museum-W1582_3.jpg
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Decided to take part in the green watch dial fad, but didn't want to take a risk with a more expensive piece, so just got the Seiko ''Mockingbird'' SRPD37J1:

IMG_2626.jpg


IMG_2628.jpg


It's the Seiko forest green, so is quite dark and subtle and the gold second dial is a a nice contrast.

The 4R35 movement has less power reserve and higher tolerances on +/- secs a day than the original Cocktail ''Skydiver'', but the first one was thicker and that aesthetic flaw has been rectified with the new editions post 2017.

The ''Skydiver'' is of course the classic Cocktail Time with the blue sunburst dial which is fantastic in natural sunlight.

There's a lot of complaints on the net that Seiko's upping the pricing, I think these are priced right for the market. Reasonable bang for €430 and in the States they're quite a bit more cost effective.
 

Rambo

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Decided to take part in the green watch dial fad, but didn't want to take a risk with a more expensive piece, so just got the Seiko ''Mockingbird'' SRPD37J1:

View attachment 40351

View attachment 40352

It's the Seiko forest green, so is quite dark and subtle and the gold second dial is a a nice contrast.

The 4R35 movement has less power reserve and higher tolerances on +/- secs a day than the original Cocktail ''Skydiver'', but the first one was thicker and that aesthetic flaw has been rectified with the new editions post 2017.

The ''Skydiver'' is of course the classic Cocktail Time with the blue sunburst dial which is fantastic in natural sunlight.

There's a lot of complaints on the net that Seiko's upping the pricing, I think these are priced right for the market. Reasonable bang for €430 and in the States they're quite a bit more cost effective.
https://www.bloomingdales.com/shop/product/seiko-presage-watch-40.5mm?ID=3838571

+15% off. you want me to ship you one?
 

florisgreen

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Really struck by this Omega Seamaster 300 in bronze gold, a new alloy Omega is patenting. This new material, containing gold (37,5%), silver and palladium, is skin friendly and does not cause allergies, unlike usual bronze, moreover it won't easily oxidise and will produce a subtle patina, according to the producer.

The watch looks awesome to me.

Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.011.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.009.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.010.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.002.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.004.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.006.jpg
Omega-Seamaster-300-234.92.41.21.10.001.015.jpg

img-keyfeatures-dial2-SE300BronzeGold-final.jpg



I'm especially fond of that sandwich deep brown (tropical) dial with the cream lume.

At 11,600 EUR it's positioned in a medium-high range, but the timepiece is really something special.

Review by Fratello Watches: https://www.fratellowatches.com/hands-on-the-new-omega-seamaster-300-in-bronze-gold/#gref
 
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Pimpernel Smith

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Too late now, I've bought in and wearing it.

We'd have to run the gauntlet of Dutch customs and they wouldn't accept a new watch being sent as being worth next to zero. They're so well on the case and I am a known importer of goods from outside of the EU.
Really struck by this Omega Seamaster 300 in bronze gold, a new alloy Omega is patenting. This new material, containing gold (37,5%), silver and palladium, is skin friendly and does not cause allergies, unlike usual bronze, moreover it won't easily oxidise and will produce a subtle patina, according to the producer.

The watch looks awesome to me.

View attachment 40371View attachment 40372View attachment 40373View attachment 40375View attachment 40376View attachment 40377View attachment 40378
View attachment 40380


I'm especially fond of that sandwich deep brown (tropical) dial with the cream lume.

At 11,600 EUR it's positioned in a medium-high range, but the timepiece is really something special.

Review by Fratello Watches: https://www.fratellowatches.com/hands-on-the-new-omega-seamaster-300-in-bronze-gold/#gref
But the bronze...
 

doghouse

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I've been getting absolutely bombarded by ads for Lorier watches on Insta. As near as I can tell they are a budget brand out of NYC. I am not really a potential customer, but wondering if anyone has heard of them before. They seem to be in full court press phase of marketing.
 

formby002

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I've been getting absolutely bombarded by ads for Lorier watches on Insta. As near as I can tell they are a budget brand out of NYC. I am not really a potential customer, but wondering if anyone has heard of them before. They seem to be in full court press phase of marketing.
Do THEY know who YOU are...?
 

florisgreen

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I've been getting absolutely bombarded by ads for Lorier watches on Insta. As near as I can tell they are a budget brand out of NYC. I am not really a potential customer, but wondering if anyone has heard of them before. They seem to be in full court press phase of marketing.

I never heard about this brand, but at a price point of $500 they look attractive.

Screenshot (482).png
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Miyota and Seagull movements and hesalite instead of sapphire crystal, but for that price nothing wrong.

It could be a nice everyday timepiece.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Pimpernel Smith

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The Urban Gentry's take on Get Carter and Michael Caine's Rolex Day Date's:



He certainly gets Roy Budd's soundtrack wrong. Mellow? That was the first bhangra influenced soundtrack:

 

Kingstonian

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The Urban Gentry's take on Get Carter and Michael Caine's Rolex Day Date's:



He certainly gets Roy Budd's soundtrack wrong. Mellow? That was the first bhangra influenced soundtrack:

He omits the early faux pas.

Having arrived in Newcastle, Caine walks into the pub (now demolished) and asks for a pint in a thin glass. Nobody ever asked for a pint in a thin glass. The line should have been in a straight glass.

U Gentry prefers to concentrate on the minutia of wardrobe/watch, being the sort(like Zac Goldsmith) that probably holds his beer glass in both hands.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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He omits the early faux pas.

Having arrived in Newcastle, Caine walks into the pub (now demolished) and asks for a pint in a thin glass. Nobody ever asked for a pint in a thin glass. The line should have been in a straight glass.
Straight glass, most definitely. Suspect parts of Newcastle were rather grim in the 70s as the films portrays.

The book the film was based on, Jack's Return Home by Ted Lewis, was set in Scunthorpe in Lincolnshire which is a great county on the quiet. In real life, I thought the London gangster's preferred Glaswegians as hard men and enforcers?

The first time I saw Get Garter it was one of those BBC heavily edited redacted versions with all the niece involved in porn films cut out, the plot didn't make much sense.
 

Kingstonian

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It’s not just in urban areas that you need to be careful about your watch

Rolex Rippers’: Elderly brothers living 80 miles apart become latest victims of watch thieves​

Siblings were approached by women with Eastern European accents asking for signatures to help a charity before being robbed

ByIzzy Lyons, CRIME CORRESPONDENT7 August 2021 • 6:00pm
Michael Parry

Michael Parry, 84, had his £13,500 Rolex watch stolen by an Eastern European woman posing as a charity worker while out shopping in his local village supermarket in the Cotswolds CREDIT: John Lawrence for The Telegraph
Elderly brothers living more than 80 miles from one another have fallen victim to a gang of thieves dubbed the “Rolex Rippers” in separate attacks.
The criminals, whose identities are not known, have stolen watches from pensioners in at least 14 robberies in affluent areas and exclusive golf courses in Dorset, Hampshire and Surrey.
In every case, victims have reported being approached by one or two women with Eastern European accents carrying a blue clipboard and asking for signatures to help a charity for deaf and dumb children.
Within minutes, the thieves grab the expensive timepieces from their victims’ wrists before making off in a car.
This week, The Telegraph uncovered two more victims - brothers Michael and David Parry who were separately targeted months apart in different counties by women matching the same description.
Michael Parry, 84, a farmer from the Cotswolds, Gloucestershire, had his £13,500 Rolex stolen by an Eastern European woman posing as a charity worker while out shopping in his local village supermarket on July 8.

'The modus operandi was exactly the same'​

“The modus operandi was exactly the same as the other cases - it was two people, with a blue clipboard asking me to sign it for charity to help deaf people,” Mr Parry said.
“I took the clipboard and signed it as I did not have any money on me. Then she put her hand out, which I thought was to thank me, but then she grabbed hold of me and pushed me against my car door and started screaming at the top of her voice.
“The change was just so sudden and enormous, she was screaming her head off. It was like she was having a fit. It was so out of the blue.
“I was trying to push her away because I worried that if anyone came around the corner they would have thought that I was attacking her. What I hadn’t realised was that she was scratching away at my wrist and eventually she pulled my Rolex watch off.
“Then she jumped over the wall and ran into the car and they were off.”
 

florisgreen

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They've always been garbage...

Discrediting and despising in toto such a prestigious brand seems highly opinable and rather biased to me.
Of course Panerai is not on par as for the movements with the best Swiss houses, but its timepieces are among the most iconic and recognisable in the whole horological world.
 

formby002

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Discrediting and despising in toto such a prestigious brand seems highly opinable and rather biased to me.
Of course Panerai is not on par as for the movements with the best Swiss houses, but its timepieces are among the most iconic and recognisable in the whole horological world.
1628586719943.png


It's a confected brand darling. The Creed of the horological world, beloved of gym bunnies and Sly Stallone wannabees.
 

Journeyman

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In-house automatic movement P4000.

What the article sets out is how these "in house" movements are not, actually, "in house". They are made by a different company - which is also owned by Richemont - and are typically used in a number of other Richemont watch brands, with greater or lesser levels of decoration or customisation.

Interestingly, this is what previously happened in watch-making - similar to car manufacturing. It simply did not make sense for a watch company to make everything, just as it does not make sense for a car company to make all of its components. Therefore, various tasks were outsourced and various parts were bought from suppliers. Watches from different brands would sometimes have the same case - from memory, back in the 1960s Heuer's iconic Carrera shared a case (and probably Lemania movement, too) with chronographs from a few other brands. This wasn't unusual.

Bracelets, cases, calibres (ie movements) and more were all made by external companies, to varying specifications. Rolex bracelets used to be produced by a whole range of different companies, including ones across Europe and even in Mexico.

However, the last decade, particularly the past 5 - 6 years, has given rise to a mania about how "in house" is best and how a watch company cannot call itself a "manufacture" unless it makes its own movements. This has given rise to a whole host of relatively new in-house movements, of varying degrees of reliability. Of course, it's also given watch companies ample reason to jack up prices, because now they can say that they are part of "haute horlogerie" as they make their own movements and other watch parts.

It's also given rise to examples such as Panerai, where they seem to merely be pretending that the movements are designed and made in-house...
 
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florisgreen

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What the article sets out is how these "in house" movements are not, actually, "in house". They are made by a different company - which is also owned by Richemont - and are typically used in a number of other Richemont watch brands, with greater or lesser levels of decoration or customisation.

I agree with your post in the substance, but I believe that some movements were actually projected and developed by Panerai.
 

formby002

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What the article sets out is how these "in house" movements are not, actually, "in house". They are made by a different company - which is also owned by Richemont - and are typically used in a number of other Richemont watch brands, with greater or lesser levels of decoration or customisation.

Interestingly, this is what previously happened in watch-making - similar to car manufacturing. It simply did not make sense for a watch company to make everything, just as it does not make sense for a car company to make all of its components. Therefore, various tasks were outsourced and various parts were bought from suppliers. Watches from different brands would sometimes have the same case - from memory, back in the 1960s Heuer's iconic Carrera shared a case (and probably Lemania movement, too) with chronographs from a few other brands. This wasn't unusual.

Bracelets, cases, calibres (ie movements) and more were all made by external companies, to varying specifications. Rolex bracelets used to be produced by a whole range of different companies, including ones across Europe and even in Mexico.

However, the last decade, particularly the past 5 - 6 years, has given rise to a mania about how "in house" is best and how a watch company cannot call itself a "manufacture" unless it makes its own movements. This has given rise to a whole host of relatively new in-house movements, of varying degrees of reliability. Of course, it's also given watch companies ample reason to jack up prices, because now they can say that they are part of "haute horlogerie" as they make their own movements and other watch parts.

It's also given rise to examples such as Panerai, where they seem to merely be pretending that the movements are designed and made in-house...
It's a phony brand, a product of PR, marketing bullshit, and cynical business practices. All-in-all a very modern purveyor of 'luxury' goods.

If you like the aesthetics fine, buy one, but buy the cheapest model(s) they make as the more expensive ones have little to no merit.
 

Panama

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I've been getting absolutely bombarded by ads for Lorier watches on Insta. As near as I can tell they are a budget brand out of NYC. I am not really a potential customer, but wondering if anyone has heard of them before. They seem to be in full court press phase of marketing.
The Urban Gentry is a fan.
 

florisgreen

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If I were in charge at the design department of Seiko I would certainly think of a re-issue of the 5718-8000 Counter Chrono launched in occasion of the 1964 Olimpics of Tokyo. It was an ultra limited edition only sold during the two weeks of the games. There are no official numbers, but someone estimates only about 100 pieces produced. It was offered in silver and grey (my favourite).

DSCF2318.jpg
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DSCF2304.jpg


I'm also very fond of that gorgeous bracelet with hexagonal links.

Here something more: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/t...e-points-to-japans-incredible-olympic-history
 

Rambo

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If I were in charge at the design department of Seiko I would certainly think of a re-issue of the 5718-8000 Counter Chrono launched in occasion of the 1964 Olimpics of Tokyo. It was an ultra limited edition only sold during the two weeks of the games. There are no official numbers, but someone estimates only about 100 pieces produced. It was offered in silver and grey (my favourite).

View attachment 40480View attachment 40481View attachment 40482View attachment 40483

I'm also very fond of that gorgeous bracelet with hexagonal links.

Here something more: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/t...e-points-to-japans-incredible-olympic-history
i really like that. the band is pretty unique.
 

florisgreen

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Seen yesterday the first time in person, the Tissot PRX: no love sparks. The bezel is high-polished and contrasts too strongly with the overall matt finishing, what in the pictures does not properly come out.

Tissot-PRX-40-205-Powermatic-80-automatic-review-7 (1).jpg



I liked quite more the Maurice Lacroix Aikon, exposed in the same window. I was never a fan of this brand (that M in the logo looks so ugly to me), but was actually positively struck by this watch, even though I think it would look better with a flat bezel and silver (instead of gold) indices.

ml_valentines_1080x1080_23.jpg
 

Pimpernel Smith

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What the article sets out is how these "in house" movements are not, actually, "in house". They are made by a different company - which is also owned by Richemont - and are typically used in a number of other Richemont watch brands, with greater or lesser levels of decoration or customisation.

Interestingly, this is what previously happened in watch-making - similar to car manufacturing. It simply did not make sense for a watch company to make everything, just as it does not make sense for a car company to make all of its components. Therefore, various tasks were outsourced and various parts were bought from suppliers. Watches from different brands would sometimes have the same case - from memory, back in the 1960s Heuer's iconic Carrera shared a case (and probably Lemania movement, too) with chronographs from a few other brands. This wasn't unusual.

Bracelets, cases, calibres (ie movements) and more were all made by external companies, to varying specifications. Rolex bracelets used to be produced by a whole range of different companies, including ones across Europe and even in Mexico.

However, the last decade, particularly the past 5 - 6 years, has given rise to a mania about how "in house" is best and how a watch company cannot call itself a "manufacture" unless it makes its own movements. This has given rise to a whole host of relatively new in-house movements, of varying degrees of reliability. Of course, it's also given watch companies ample reason to jack up prices, because now they can say that they are part of "haute horlogerie" as they make their own movements and other watch parts.

It's also given rise to examples such as Panerai, where they seem to merely be pretending that the movements are designed and made in-house...
The distinction is important: in-house, exclusive, modified or designed. As for cache, Seiko watches are all in-house movements. As long as the watchmaker is honest then I don't have a problem, but clearly Panerai have pushed the envelope there into dishonesty. As a resurrected brand, there is always an issue of not being in continuous operation, but really does that matter as long as they're being authentic to the legacy? Glycine have done a good job in this respect, remaining true to the original designs.

Panerai were a watch to be had back in the mid-2000's. There was a real buzz, but that was at the time that over sized watches were in fashion. They're alleged to be struggling and they've been hit by high quality forgeries.

One of the original designers left in the late 2000's and set-up a watch company with big bold over sized watches, but more modern designs and affordable. Can't remember the name or the watch brand. Couldn't find it with a Google search either.


The Urban Gentry is a fan.
He's always plugging those Dan Henry watches too.
If I were in charge at the design department of Seiko I would certainly think of a re-issue of the 5718-8000 Counter Chrono launched in occasion of the 1964 Olimpics of Tokyo. It was an ultra limited edition only sold during the two weeks of the games. There are no official numbers, but someone estimates only about 100 pieces produced. It was offered in silver and grey (my favourite).

View attachment 40480View attachment 40481View attachment 40482View attachment 40483

I'm also very fond of that gorgeous bracelet with hexagonal links.

Here something more: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/t...e-points-to-japans-incredible-olympic-history
Would like to see a re-edition of the 6139-600 series, as won by astronauts, Flash Gordon and Paul Newman when he wasn't wearing his Daytona:


57814edf-69b3-468d-b9a1-6465d729ff56.jpg
 

florisgreen

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One of the original designers left in the late 2000's and set-up a watch company with big bold over sized watches, but more modern designs and affordable. Can't remember the name or the watch brand. Couldn't find it with a Google search either.

Maybe Anonimo?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Maybe Anonimo?
Found it now: Mounir Moufarrige, who was CEO of the Richemont Group and is recognized as spotting the trend for larger watches with Panerai. In 2005 he teamed-up with the designer Italo Fontana the creator of the U-Boat and Welder watch brands. If you look at the marketing and brand spin of U-Boat and Welder it's very similar to Panerai e.g. discovering in an old trunk of his grandfather designs for watches planned the Italian navy, etc, etc.
 

formby002

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1,870
The distinction is important: in-house, exclusive, modified or designed. As for cache, Seiko watches are all in-house movements. As long as the watchmaker is honest then I don't have a problem, but clearly Panerai have pushed the envelope there into dishonesty. As a resurrected brand, there is always an issue of not being in continuous operation, but really does that matter as long as they're being authentic to the legacy? Glycine have done a good job in this respect, remaining true to the original designs.

Panerai were a watch to be had back in the mid-2000's. There was a real buzz, but that was at the time that over sized watches were in fashion. They're alleged to be struggling and they've been hit by high quality forgeries.

One of the original designers left in the late 2000's and set-up a watch company with big bold over sized watches, but more modern designs and affordable. Can't remember the name or the watch brand. Couldn't find it with a Google search either.



He's always plugging those Dan Henry watches too.

Would like to see a re-edition of the 6139-600 series, as won by astronauts, Flash Gordon and Paul Newman when he wasn't wearing his Daytona:


View attachment 40496

Panerai was originally an instrument maker (compasses and depth gauges), they don't have a legacy of watchmaking. Their watches for the Italian Navy were gussied-up Rolexes. Its 'heritage' is a confected one, hence my reference to Creed earlier.

Come to think of it, they also remind me of Lamborghini, and in more ways than one. I can well imagine them being the watch of choice for the Lamborghini driver.

Garbage brand.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Its 'heritage' is a confected one, hence my reference to Creed earlier.
Had Creed sussed when they brought out the Original Vetiver which was an obvious inferior scent to the normal Vetiver which they took off the market soon after. All of their stuff hasn't dated well: Silver Mountain Water and the likes.
 

Panama

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When did Pannerai cease and when was it resurrected by Richemont? Or was it just a relaunch of a brand that just survived the quartz crisis?
 

formby002

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When did Pannerai cease and when was it resurrected by Richemont? Or was it just a relaunch of a brand that just survived the quartz crisis?

It was resurrected in 1997 I think. The late 1990s anyway.

They were originally a Family owned Florentine instrument maker.
 

formby002

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Had Creed sussed when they brought out the Original Vetiver which was an obvious inferior scent to the normal Vetiver which they took off the market soon after. All of their stuff hasn't dated well: Silver Mountain Water and the likes.
Creed makes some good scents, and I like their Vetiver ones, but, I like all Vetiver-based scents, to be honest, but theirs is fake history created by the marketing department to justify their high prices.

In our current crisis, we are caught between the pincers of 'authenticity' bullshit and 'heritage' bullshit.

Why can't we just have genuine fakery as we did in the good ole days...!!! Eh...Eh...Eh...?
 

Panama

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It was resurrected in 1997 I think. The late 1990s anyway.

They were originally a Family owned Florentine instrument maker.
Having looked at their history, they appear to be suppliers very similar to CWC/Cabot Watch Company who currently supply the Royal Navy divers and the SBS. Imagine buying CWC and turning it into a prestigious brand based on their military contract.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Having looked at their history, they appear to be suppliers very similar to CWC/Cabot Watch Company who currently supply the Royal Navy divers and the SBS. Imagine buying CWC and turning it into a prestigious brand based on their military contract.
CWC don't currently supply the Royal Navy or SBS. It's all historic.

Silvermans own the brand now.

Same as Eddie Platts owns Smiths as a watch brand.

Smiths didn't die when they stopped watch making, the business is still going in high tech missile and military technology. They just ditched the analogue low technology watches.
 
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