Choosing dress shirt weave

Weave selection:


  • Total voters
    7

WildBlue

Well-Known Member
Messages
217
Ratings
232
I was thinking about commissioning one or more dress shirts from a local shirtmaker in plain colours (mostly thinking about very light blue and white), however I am unsure which type of weave would best fit my requirements, which I'll list below:

1) I don't really enjoy wrinkles (I shouldn't fret too much about them, though it's almost an idiosyncrasy), so having something that can hold up to them decently it's a plus;
2) Ideally I'd like a weave that can work in the summer;
3) A pronounced sheen is a deal breaker;
4) Nipples (thanks evolution, next time remove useless parts, please) should not show;
5) It should be formal enough to be worn with a suit, but also work with a sports jacket.

Does 2 ply 80s/100s poplin/broadcloth meet such standards or will I have to resort to something else?
 

QuandoDio

Well-Known Member
Messages
702
Ratings
1,270
Your choices are too limited.

For 1) Twill is arguably best, with royal oxford (depending on he fabric though) next and poplin a distant third. Broadcloth performs as well as Twill though.

Point 2) None really work as a 'summer shirt' , though depends on your summer. I can wear all comfortably in most of the summer in the UK. When i am in the US or Mediterranean, none perform well. Poplins perform the best from your choices i guess.

Point 3) Sheens: out goes with twills and royal oxford - especially the latter. None should really have a pronounced sheen. Ceteris Paribus, again Poplins/ Broadcloths the winner here.

Point 4) None should really be diaphanous. Twills perform best, then royal oxford

Point 5) All work for suiting. Though, i must caution against Royal Oxford with OJ if that bothers you as royal oxford is for all intents and purposes the most formal of shirting materials. I leave mine for weddings but have no qualms wearing it with OJ


My point: You are overthinking it and just get some broadcloths as all-rounders or shell out more and get climate specific shirting.
 

WildBlue

Well-Known Member
Messages
217
Ratings
232
Your choices are too limited.

For 1) Twill is arguably best, with royal oxford (depending on he fabric though) next and poplin a distant third. Broadcloth performs as well as Twill though.

Point 2) None really work as a 'summer shirt' , though depends on your summer. I can wear all comfortably in most of the summer in the UK. When i am in the US or Mediterranean, none perform well. Poplins perform the best from your choices i guess.

Point 3) Sheens: out goes with twills and royal oxford - especially the latter. None should really have a pronounced sheen. Ceteris Paribus, again Poplins/ Broadcloths the winner here.

Point 4) None should really be diaphanous. Twills perform best, then royal oxford

Point 5) All work for suiting. Though, i must caution against Royal Oxford with OJ if that bothers you as royal oxford is for all intents and purposes the most formal of shirting materials. I leave mine for weddings but have no qualms wearing it with OJ


My point: You are overthinking it and just get some broadcloths as all-rounders or shell out more and get climate specific shirting.
I gave those choices because they seem to be the most common weave types, I'm sure the shirtmaker has many more, though I haven't asked.

1) As far as I know, the difference between poplin and broadcloth is simply that poplin can have different weights on the yarn or weft, is it true? Also, why are poplin shirts usually referred as "crisp" if they wrinkle more?

2) I live in Molise, central/southern Italy, I'd say 23 °C is the lowest it will reach during July/August, so it's no dice I guess.

5) I have no issues with it either, I'm not that pedantic and obsessed, otherwise I'd have been on SF ;)

You are right, I was just curious since I'm quite new to menswear, knowledge can only help.
 

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
Moderator
Messages
19,051
Ratings
23,903
Poplin = broadcloth for all intents and purposes.

Consider end-on-end

For warm weather think cotton/linen, or voile
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
5,805
Ratings
5,705
Your choices are too limited.

For 1) Twill is arguably best, with royal oxford (depending on he fabric though) next and poplin a distant third. Broadcloth performs as well as Twill though.

Point 2) None really work as a 'summer shirt' , though depends on your summer. I can wear all comfortably in most of the summer in the UK. When i am in the US or Mediterranean, none perform well. Poplins perform the best from your choices i guess.

Point 3) Sheens: out goes with twills and royal oxford - especially the latter. None should really have a pronounced sheen. Ceteris Paribus, again Poplins/ Broadcloths the winner here.

Point 4) None should really be diaphanous. Twills perform best, then royal oxford

Point 5) All work for suiting. Though, i must caution against Royal Oxford with OJ if that bothers you as royal oxford is for all intents and purposes the most formal of shirting materials. I leave mine for weddings but have no qualms wearing it with OJ


My point: You are overthinking it and just get some broadcloths as all-rounders or shell out more and get climate specific shirting.
Whats OJ? - I usually go for Royal Oxford if its business suit and tie - I like that it gives a bit of texture but looks refine to me.
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
5,805
Ratings
5,705
OJ = Odd Jacket? - is this some iGent thing ... I call 'em sportscoats/sportsjackets usually normal old Oxford cloth if wearing a tie - a few poplins in candy or butchers /awning stripes. I have a lot of linen and linen /cotton, I don't think I have any end on end at all.
 

Lord Buckley

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,940
Ratings
966
If I was living in the south of Italy, particularly somewhere like Sicily where the winters are short and mild, I would be going minimum poplin two fold 120's and above in plain colours and patterns. I wouldn't bother with oxford, royal Oxfords or any kind of textured fabric. Not sure what the winters are like Molise, but I visit Florence and Arezzo in Tuscany regularly throughout the year and although the weather can be bitter and windy from the end of October, it generally feels like Spring has arrived in February. Significantly better climate than the north of Italy.
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
2,937
Ratings
3,180
Royal oxford and twill are, in general, a bit heavier than poplin/broadcloth.

In summer, as others have mentioned, I'd go for poplin, linen-cotton blend or voile (although the latter might be a bit translucent).

I don't mind royal oxford but the fabric can have a sheen and also I've found that it wears quite quickly. Poplin and end-on-end (also called fil-a-fil, I think) are both lighter and more durable.
 

formby

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,273
Ratings
1,226
Batiste or Voile for summer cotton. Batiste is preferable because Voile is transparent. (Acorn Zephyr is nice, I have several)

Linen or Bamboo/Linen for non-cottons, but be mindful they crease, Linen more than the mix.
 
Last edited:

WildBlue

Well-Known Member
Messages
217
Ratings
232
Batiste or Voile for summer cotton. Batiste is preferable because Voile is transparent. (Acorn Zephyr is nice, I have several)
I'll ask, I saw some Acorn fabrics in his store.

Thanks for all the suggestions, in the end I decided to go for a trial 120s poplin in pure cotton.

Replying to Lord Buckley, as far as seasons are concerned, Molise and Abruzzo are weird. Winters are usually in single digits celsius, with some negative instances. Spring usually starts in late February/mid March, however we still get plenty showers and foggy days. To sum it up: if you're not particularly a happy fellow it's suicide inducing weather most of the year.

If anybody is interested in this bespoke shirtmaker work I'll post the end results!
 

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
Moderator
Messages
19,051
Ratings
23,903
I'll ask, I saw some Acorn fabrics in his store.

Thanks for all the suggestions, in the end I decided to go for a trial 120s poplin in pure cotton.

Replying to Lord Buckley, as far as seasons are concerned, Molise and Abruzzo are weird. Winters are usually in single digits celsius, with some negative instances. Spring usually starts in late February/mid March, however we still get plenty showers and foggy days. To sum it up: if you're not particularly a happy fellow it's suicide inducing weather most of the year.

If anybody is interested in this bespoke shirtmaker work I'll post the end results!
Please do post your experience. Pics. And please, no pics of you sitting drinking cappacino all day in the shop annoying the maestro like weak Monday did
 

WildBlue

Well-Known Member
Messages
217
Ratings
232
Please do post your experience. Pics. And please, no pics of you sitting drinking cappacino all day in the shop annoying the maestro like weak Monday did
Don't worry about that, there is no risk of useless unmanly coffee drinking.

I won't be able to take any pics during fittings, but I'll be more than glad to capture the rest of the workshop.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
1,692
Ratings
2,765
Here you go:
https://dappered.com/2014/07/a-primer-on-shirt-fabrics-poplin-vs-pinpoint-vs-twill-more/

I'm starting to get the highend dress shirt bug again too. Going to start going the bespoke route again, and l am excited about it. Been too lazy to bother for the last several years, but I really dislike OTR for many reasons so l need to get off my backside and start doing shirt research and spend time planning what l need to get. I really don't have much time to do it, but if l get 10 done that'll do.
 

WildBlue

Well-Known Member
Messages
217
Ratings
232
Here you go:
https://dappered.com/2014/07/a-primer-on-shirt-fabrics-poplin-vs-pinpoint-vs-twill-more/

I'm starting to get the highend dress shirt bug again too. Going to start going the bespoke route again, and l am excited about it. Been too lazy to bother for the last several years, but I really dislike OTR for many reasons so l need to get off my backside and start doing shirt research and spend time planning what l need to get. I really don't have much time to do it, but if l get 10 done that'll do.
For me it's a necessity, no OTR that I've tried for less than 120 euros fits me like it should so yeah...
Why not ask your shirt maker to recommend a tailor ?
Thought about it as well and will actually do it. Thanks for the tip anyways!
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
1,692
Ratings
2,765
For me it's a necessity, no OTR that I've tried for less than 120 euros fits me like it should so yeah...
Thought about it as well and will actually do it. Thanks for the tip anyways!
Yeah, fit is an issue with me also.

I am planning to get a bunch of bengal stripe shirts - some shirts with medium lines and others with thin lines, and of red/white and blue/white. AND l also want to get really luxurious white shirts.

I am also going to get my old shirt duplicated, this was always a show stopper with a suit and appropriate tie. None of the club collars were ever to my satisfaction so l drew this design and had my maker copy it.
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=...n+contract+collar+shirts&imgrc=t9X7_-HBnakxQM:

Note: I put a piece of white paper near the yolk area of the shirt to block out who my maker is. I usually only speak about my makers in hushed tones to the few, especially my favourite tailor and also my secret shoo makers who only make for me. Note 2: the best shoo makers in Oz are the ones who no-one knows about and make their things at home.
 
G

Gus

Guest
My favorite dress shirt fabrics are end-on-end. I have them in shades of blue, pink and white. The end-on-end gives a very subtle visual texture yet they are as easy to mix as a solid.
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
2,937
Ratings
3,180
My favorite dress shirt fabrics are end-on-end. I have them in shades of blue, pink and white. The end-on-end gives a very subtle visual texture yet they are as easy to mix as a solid.
Gus, I agree. End-on-end (which I think is also referred to as fil-a-fil) is one of my favourite fabrics and I've got a few shirts made up in it. Light, hard-wearing and, as you say, with a little bit of visual interest up close.
 
Top Bottom