Cooking Tips, Tricks, Recipes, & Advice

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
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First time ive ever heard of a barberry
Big in folk healing. A very drought tolerant, hardy plant. Grows nicely in Saskabush. Compact (small to medium). Adds some nice colour to the garden.

Screen Shot 2020-06-15 at 7.34.09 PM.png
 

Fwiffo

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They're sour. As with most things in Persian ingredients (lime, yogurt, lemon, pomegranate molasses, etc) but it seems most recipes recommend a bit of sugar when you sautee them.
 

Fwiffo

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Wanted to do a tuna ragu but will do this instead for the weekend.
 

Fwiffo

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finally, a normal serving size.
I'll probably go for something smaller because I'm pairing it with the vegetable Napoleon cake at 2:54 here


And then the left over parsley and watercress will go into a puree soup
 

Fwiffo

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I don't have sour grapes so I'm adding the crushed limoo. Waiting for this to cook down right now.
 

Fwiffo

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Yeah yours. Lets see what youre up to.
I'm serving it family style so I don't think it looks particularly appealing.

From the top left:

Maast o khiar - cucumber, yogurt, dried mint

Salad shirazi - cucumber, tomato, mint, lemon juice, red onion

Khoresh bademjan - beef, tomato, eggplant stew

I used a Persian smoked rice which is different from the usual longer basmati rice. Saffron. Potato 'tah-deeg'. Slivered almonds and pistachios.


IMG_20200705_1753267_1.jpg
 

Rambo

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I'm serving it family style so I don't think it looks particularly appealing.

From the top left:

Maast o khiar - cucumber, yogurt, dried mint

Salad shirazi - cucumber, tomato, mint, lemon juice, red onion

Khoresh bademjan - beef, tomato, eggplant stew

I used a Persian smoked rice which is different from the usual longer basmati rice. Saffron. Potato 'tah-deeg'. Slivered almonds and pistachios.


View attachment 34097
that looks fucking delicious
 

Fwiffo

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That all looks great, Fwiff.

Those potatoes look absolutely fantastic.
After parboiling the rice I use a thin layer of vegetable oil and water on the bottom of a non stick pot. Then I put the sliced potatoes on and sprinkle some powdered saffron and then the rice with blobs of butter on top. I steam it on low with a cloth around the pot's cover for an hour but in the final 15 minutes move it to medium to do a controlled burn. I find that's easier and more predictable than using yogurt to initiate the burning or to do medium high and then steam it at low.
 

Journeyman

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So you essentially cover the sliced potatoes with rice, and cook the potatoes and rice together? Or have I misunderstood the description?
 

Fwiffo

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So you essentially cover the sliced potatoes with rice, and cook the potatoes and rice together? Or have I misunderstood the description?

Pictures are easier to understand than words.

Although I make a small mountain when putting the rice back in and make little holes with the handle end of the spatula for the rice to breathe. Then I put blobs of butter on top so they melt and go through the rice and back down to the potatoes.

You can make potato tah deeg, or use bread, or lettuce.
 

Journeyman

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Ah, so the rice is already parboiled, or partially cooked, when you put it on top of the potatoes? That makes more sense, as I was wondering how there would be enough liquid to cook the rice.
 

Fwiffo

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Ah, so the rice is already parboiled, or partially cooked, when you put it on top of the potatoes? That makes more sense, as I was wondering how there would be enough liquid to cook the rice.
Yes - parboiled. Then you dump it into a colander and put water on it to stop the cooking and wash off the salt.
 

QuandoDio

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Tahdig is very popular in Persian cooking as I recall it is essentially burnt rice ( well, the rice version). And people fight over the burnt part. It is tossed with very expensive 'saffron' which I don't quite get.

Not really to my taste but I find the whole wrapped kitchen towel over the lid a relatively unique concept, localised to the ME.
 

Fwiffo

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Tahdig is very popular in Persian cooking as I recall it is essentially burnt rice ( well, the rice version). And people fight over the burnt part. It is tossed with very expensive 'saffron' which I don't quite get.

Not really to my taste but I find the whole wrapped kitchen towel over the lid a relatively unique concept, localised to the ME.
None more expensive than Persian saffron.
 

Fwiffo

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I wanted to try this on the weekend. I don't bake so I have to improvise for that last step.
 

Fwiffo

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All traditional recipes seem to call for ricotta salata though. And of course no child.
 

Fwiffo

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IMG_20200712_1810401~2.jpg

IMG_20200712_1803440~2.jpg

My attempts at Sicilian tradizione and then reimagined. Cheated a bit because my cheese ingredients failed me and I don't have the bakeware for the lasagne.
 
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