Cosmetic Surgery

Fwiffo

Comes off as a condescending prick
Supporter
Messages
18,152
Should I get cosmetic surgery for my jaw?

I'm like the bloke here: http://orthocj.com/2000/06/a-patients-guide-to-orthognathic-surgery/
search for "Reduction of the Lower Jaw"

I don't have issues chewing like some other people where only their back molars touch - believe me I can eat triple patty burgers, steaks, etc. I don't have jaw pain, headaches - but I do snore - however I think that's more likely a combination of weight and weak muscles. Consequently with this type of underbite no quick fix anti-snore devices will help me. My teeth are remarkably in pretty good shape. If I didn't have my Jay Leno jaw, they'd be okay except for a chip I got on one tooth when I smashed my face five years ago.

However the recovery is lengthy and there's no guarantee you get your nerves functioning in your lips or parts of the jaw. In the worst case you lose your teeth or your gums start retreating or something. And every blog I come across where the results are good, there's still lingering facial effects. Never mind what the hell I'm going to do staying in, not trying new restaurants, sucking whisky from a straw for six months.
http://mybrokenface.wordpress.com/

And some people who go for the surgery have such a slight issue: http://www.thunderandthreads.com/2013/03/my-underbite-experience-pre-surgery.html

I can never smile with teeth in photographs so you get a smirk from me. I save on teeth whiteners. If I'm seated in front of a mirror or I'm self-conscious, I relax my jaw (much like the girl above) so it doesn't exasperate the issue.
 
I must admit that the photos on the site are impressive, but I really value a mouth that, you know, works. I'd check back in five years and see if they have it worked out a little better.
 
What Sir Fwiffo needs to ask himself is he bothered by his facial features. Beyond functional issues, there are significant self esteem issues in such patients. It does not sound like Fwiffo has such self-esteem issues as he seems to enjoy a robust social life and it does not sound like his face sends the birds he interacts with running in the opposite direction.

Now, besides snoring, it does not seem like he has functional issues.

The process would involve two-jaw surgery. An advancement of the maxilla (upper jaw) and splitting of the mandible (lower jaw) to move it back. In severe cases there is also a genioplasty or a reduction of the chin button. Braces may or may not be involved. It is easier to get the proper esthetics with smaller movments to both jaws versus large movements of only one.

Surgery is 4 to 6 hours for two-jaw surgery. Post-op you will either be wired shut of if rigid fixation (screws) are used you will have heavy elastics holding your jaws together for about 6 weeks. You will have to drink your meals with a straw. You will have to walk around with wire cutters or snips to cut elastics should you need to puke. However, this is usually for alcoholic degenerates who vomit frequently as well as semi-crazy women who are prone to anorexic behaviour.

There is a higher risk of nerve damage from having your wisdom teeth out than orthographic surgery. With movement of the maxilla, there are blood vessels in the posterior that can be ruptured and caused to bleed. This is a significant but very rare occurrence.

Obviously, there is a remote chance of death with general anaesthetic but again rare.

Post op pain is moderate to severe so you will be on narcotic analgesics. You will probably be bunged up.

Relapse of the jaws and then moving back to their original is very common. It is a matter of fractions of mm's but can still somewhat defeat what the surgery was intended to do. No different than relapse of orthodontics if you don't wear your retainer.

It is not something to consider lightly as it is a major surgical procedure plus it is expensive even in Canada because you will be charged more than what the healthcare fee guide pays the oral surgeon.

The older you are, the more difficult it is achieving an excellent outcome and recovery time increases.
 
I must admit that the photos on the site are impressive, but I really value a mouth that, you know, works. I'd check back in five years and see if they have it worked out a little better.

The technique has come a long way. The mandibular surgery used to be done with an external approach leaving scars. Rigid fixation with screws achieves a far better result. Still not perfect
 
So why is this different then other types of dismorphia? He feels like he would look better with a chin job, why not go talk it over with a therapist before doing a cosmetic surgery that has extreme risks.
Chin job?
 
So why is this different then other types of dismorphia? He feels like he would look better with a chin job, why not go talk it over with a therapist before doing a cosmetic surgery that has extreme risks.

you overstate the risks. you are assuming he has body dysmorphia disorder rather than having a genuine desire to correct a skeletal deformity. The correct process would be to have a consultation with the oral surgeon to discuss the procedure, risks and potential benefits. he or she will rather quickly determine if he has BDD and should have counselling instead.
 
Dysmorphia? Should I look that up? I don't have a cleft lip, mouth breathing or any physical issues. The dentist said I might get some weird chips of my teeth as I get older but I haven't had any to date. My mother had my wisdom teeth taken out on my 16th birthday mostly because she knew it would exaggerate the issue if I had the wisdom teeth grown in. I went to some orthodontists as a wee lad but they all told me that retainers and braces can't resolve my issue. I won't share any photographs. The only one who has seen me from the forehead up is Rambo.

I think the general consensus is I should just leave it alone - which is what I thought but I heard this surgery was getting popular and more common place. I have no expectations that I will become Ryan Reynolds, Chris Pine or whomever people admire these days. I read about some of these stories and they mentioned spitting and inability to speak because of issues with the tongue. The spit I've trained myself through the years and more importantly when I do presentations I speak a lot slower which lets me articulate words better.

As for meeting women - no it's not for that. It's mainly for the photographs that my friends take of me when I'm unaware - such as when I'm playing with their children at Christmas. Being trim, having basic sartorial competence, having disposable money and not craving for a "10" at a club makes social situations much more pleasant. Truth be told, my mother is the only one who points it out and I got it from her genetic background. None of my immediate family have the issue. Oh wait, no, one of my mates' gay partners always says he wants my jaw and to wear a fedora with it.
 
So just correct me if I'm wrong but there is the potential for death, nerve damage, and almost certain pain after the surgery which would require opiates. Cosmetic procedures seem absurd when you consider the risk as compared to sleeping with a snore.

No surgical procedure is without possible complications. That goes for Rx and OTC mess. Going to your MD or Dentist for a simple procedure has potential negative outcomes.

Anytime you have general anaesthetic there is potential for death. Extremely low.

Nerve damage is rare. Happens more often with getting your wisdom teeth out but people do that almost as a right of passage these days.

Depending on your level of snoring, this can be a sign of sleep apnea and that has far more real problems over the long term than surgery.

I am just trying to put things into perspective so people can understand the pros and cons and bust the myths you are throwing out.

If you have your wisdom teeth extracted you will get narcotics too.

I am not advocating for the surgery. But it is safe, effective and commonly done.
 
Dysmorphia? Should I look that up? I don't have a cleft lip, mouth breathing or any physical issues. The dentist said I might get some weird chips of my teeth as I get older but I haven't had any to date. My mother had my wisdom teeth taken out on my 16th birthday mostly because she knew it would exaggerate the issue if I had the wisdom teeth grown in. I went to some orthodontists as a wee lad but they all told me that retainers and braces can't resolve my issue. I won't share any photographs. The only one who has seen me from the forehead up is Rambo.

I think the general consensus is I should just leave it alone - which is what I thought but I heard this surgery was getting popular and more common place. I have no expectations that I will become Ryan Reynolds, Chris Pine or whomever people admire these days. I read about some of these stories and they mentioned spitting and inability to speak because of issues with the tongue. The spit I've trained myself through the years and more importantly when I do presentations I speak a lot slower which lets me articulate words better.

As for meeting women - no it's not for that. It's mainly for the photographs that my friends take of me when I'm unaware - such as when I'm playing with their children at Christmas. Being trim, having basic sartorial competence, having disposable money and not craving for a "10" at a club makes social situations much more pleasant. Truth be told, my mother is the only one who points it out and I got it from her genetic background. None of my immediate family have the issue. Oh wait, no, one of my mates' gay partners always says he wants my jaw and to wear a fedora with it.

Frankly, if you don't have a function problem, you most likely should not have the surgery.

If it has really not bothered you up to this point in your life, forget it. Or have a consult to have an oral surgeon tell you what they think.

Despite what gufasd thinks, surgeons do not just cut you open for the hell of it and shitloads of $$$
 
It sounds like you have a solid grasp on things. Surgeons like to understate risks and overstate the positive outcomes, why not when they get paid small fortunes per surgery.

You are really prone to making wild assed statements aren't you?

Any surgeon, doc, dentist, chiropodist, or bird groomer worth their salt do not understate risks and overstate positive outcomes. Why? Because informed consent necessitates explaining to the patient every possible risk and negative outcome as well as alternatives and the prognosis of doing nothing at all.

Should something go awry and legal or professional action is taken, it becomes readily evident if proper informed consent was not achieved. When this happens the provider is up shit creek with respect to damages and sanction from licensing bodies.

Are their some shitbags in medical care? Yes. Do bad things happen to patients? Yes. But sweeping generalizations that ALL surgeons lie is just ridiculous.

Do surgeons make small fortunes? Yes they do. So what? There has to be some payoff for all the years of study, long hours of work that most people would not do throughout a career not to mention slave labour wages and working conditions while an intern and resident.

There are better ways to get rich than being a doc.
 
So just correct me if I'm wrong but there is the potential for death, nerve damage, and almost certain pain after the surgery which would require opiates. Cosmetic procedures seem absurd when you consider the risk as compared to sleeping with a snore.
Yes. Surgeons have a bias toward action. Stay clear.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom