Cotton v's wool v's linen in summer

The Shooman

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When it comes to wool v's cotton socks the difference is like night and day. Wool keeps the feet fresh and dry where-as cotton doesn't do near as good a job. When it comes to wearing cotton v's cashmere polos the difference is even bigger; a cotton polo can only be worn once before it needs washing where-as a cashmere polo can be worn numerous times and still feel and smell fresh.

Cotton and Linen trousers in summer
Cotton is not as fresh at the end of the day.
Linen is better, but it is still not fresh at the end of a hot day.

Are tropical weight wool trousers better to wear in summer instead of linen? ie, do they look better at the end of day, and are they fresher?

I am thinking about wearing light weight wool trousers in Summer, but will they be too warm?
What are people's experiences with wool v's cotton v's linen?

This topic has not been covered on any of the forums properly, so hopefully we can add some valuable content here.
 

Dropbear

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Tropical wool and frescos are very light and cool. Not as soft as a nice winter flannel, but not a bad trade-off. Best of all it doesn’t wrinkle too badly while still holding a crease.

Wiser people than me on this forum steered me away from pure linen to linen-cotton blends (30-50% cotton) for the best combination of staying cool without wrinkling up like an old fish and chip wrapper.
 

fxh

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The openness of the weave and looseness, eg wide, of trousers is more important than material. Well with obvious exceptions. I like the look of linen, always looks dressy but casual. But I have some McNutt linen trousers that are almost as thick as tweed.

Summer or Tropical wool works well. I’m told a good fresco or crispAire is great but I don’t need that smooth look.

Summer here is hot. Very hot. Why pretend otherwise. Thin loose linen or cotton. No jacket. I don’t own shorts.

Im surprised how cool (ish) some standard cotton OCBD s are. Linen ones even better. I’ve just in the last year or so gotten a thing for proper loose half sleeved shirts with square bottoms to hang untucked. Hard to find. I don’t like those short sleeved shirts, rather roll up a long sleeve.

Rayon Hawaiian or Party shirts are good.
 

The Shooman

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I was talking to a bloke who has worn linen, cotton and tropical weight wool trousers during summer. He told me that the wool is breezy and really comfortable in summer and the best of all the options, but it gets wrinkled and messy easily and wears quickly.

Mate, that's half the point of the summer look.

Linen is nice to have, but l like a clean trouser with a nice dress shoe. I like to choose a 12 oz cotton in summer so it drapes well.
 

formby002

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1,865
Quality linen is absolutely beautiful, cut the pants with plenty of room. Wonderfully degage.

Cotton is tight and doesn't 'give'. Cut loose like linen even though it will never be as cool.

Tropical wool is OK but can become a bit clingy around the balls on very hot days.

Fresco is good but has a rough handle...

Crispaire is H&S version of Fresco but has a smoother handle.

Summer for me is Linen all....the...fucking...way......................!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

The Shooman

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Yep, quality linen is a real treat. You also make a good point about a cutting the trousers with plenty of room, but that is how l have my trousers cut anyway. I have a few great pairs of linen trousers that no longer fit me, and l miss them a lot during summer. I wouldn't mind stocking up again on linen trousers and shirts for those hottest days.

You are right about cotton trousers, they don't have any give and aren't as nice to wear on the hottest days. It's a compromise.

Thanks Formby.
 
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Panama

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605
Light weight cotton shirts are now a summer essential: Batiste, Voile, Lawn, Aertex, Leno or Giro Inglese.

20180511_195412.jpg
 
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QuandoDio

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1,022
Very much depends. Re wool vs linen trousers. Some combination that includes Linen all the way as already stated ( wool-linen is my favourite) but sometimes the rumply look is not required and summer wools these days is pretty good tbh. I have some fresco (the itchiness is overrated)/ finmeresco but tbh, my favourite all tropical wool is VBC, the 2-ply and 4-ply. I strongly prefer the 4-ply.

Re the shirts, I have tried Voile/ Batiste and I believe voile's almost like women's undergarments. Too thin and diaphanous. But ofc, things might have changed.

So I like to keep it simple and prefer shirts that combine some form of linen too so some cotton-linen mix . They hold up well, more value for money and I really like the texture.
 

Panama

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605
Very much depends. Re wool vs linen trousers. Some combination that includes Linen all the way as already stated ( wool-linen is my favourite) but sometimes the rumply look is not required and summer wools these days is pretty good tbh. I have some fresco (the itchiness is overrated)/ finmeresco but tbh, my favourite all tropical wool is VBC, the 2-ply and 4-ply. I strongly prefer the 4-ply.

Re the shirts, I have tried Voile/ Batiste and I believe voile's almost like women's undergarments. Too thin and diaphanous. But ofc, things might have changed.

So I like to keep it simple and prefer shirts that combine some form of linen too so some cotton-linen mix . They hold up well, more value for money and I really like the texture.
My Voile is from the defunct Chester Barrie Gold Label and my Batiste is from Harvey and Hudson. I will have to take some pics in the summer. They are not as sheer as you would imagine.
 
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Pimpernel Smith

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8,162
Very much depends. Re wool vs linen trousers. Some combination that includes Linen all the way as already stated ( wool-linen is my favourite) but sometimes the rumply look is not required and summer wools these days is pretty good tbh. I have some fresco (the itchiness is overrated)/ finmeresco but tbh, my favourite all tropical wool is VBC, the 2-ply and 4-ply. I strongly prefer the 4-ply.

Re the shirts, I have tried Voile/ Batiste and I believe voile's almost like women's undergarments. Too thin and diaphanous. But ofc, things might have changed.

So I like to keep it simple and prefer shirts that combine some form of linen too so some cotton-linen mix . They hold up well, more value for money and I really like the texture.
When the heat is on, there comes a time when only linen shirts will do sans tie and jacket. T&A did some ''diamond'' treated cotton shirts a few years back, they're pretty good for the summer. I've a few of them.

When it comes to jackets you want a mix with linen, don't care which. Silk too, which seems to be making a comeback. As opposed to bamboo fabric which seems to be out of fashion at the moment.
 

Panama

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605
I have bought a Charles Tyrwhitt cotton linen blend shirt. It feels like cardboard and is definitely going back. I have been spoilt by Corneliani shirts...

20210413_033339.jpg
 

Panama

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605
I have a selection of Corneliani linen shirts, probably 4 or 5. I have just ordered Canali and Frescobol Carioca linen shirts. One is arriving today.
 

florisgreen

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1,543
I have a selection of Corneliani linen shirts, probably 4 or 5. I have just ordered Canali and Frescobol Carioca linen shirts. One is arriving today.
I would suggest you to try some Attolini shirts. I have some in cotton/linen mixtures, they're are excellent. Pure linen cloths tend to be somehow too stiff for my taste, I prefer look and feel in a mix.
 

florisgreen

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1,543
When the heat is on, there comes a time when only linen shirts will do sans tie and jacket. T&A did some ''diamond'' treated cotton shirts a few years back, they're pretty good for the summer. I've a few of them.

When it comes to jackets you want a mix with linen, don't care which. Silk too, which seems to be making a comeback. As opposed to bamboo fabric which seems to be out of fashion at the moment.
Agreed, a linen mix is ideal in summer or in a hot climate. It comes usually with silk and wool, which add suppleness and durability. Another interesting, suitable material is hemp, it's cool and somehow similar to linen in its raw look, but it's supplier and softer. It also comes usually in mix cloths: I have a Gabo jacket in 75% hemp and 25% wool.

How would you describe that "diamond" treated cotton?
 

florisgreen

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I saw these ones on the Anglo-Italian website:
:
Anglo-Italian_19533_2048x2048.jpg
Anglo-Italian_44777_2c170435-52a0-4d12-a3e8-4bd06495bc49_2048x2048.jpg
Anglo-Italian_44840_2048x2048.jpg

Rather nice, I find, typical Italian/Neapolitan shape. The first one is a 53% linen, 45% silk (?) mix, the second one is a herringbone pure linen fabric.
 

florisgreen

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1,543
I would like to talk about the Solaro fabric.

Tessuto-Solaro-in-lana-grana-di-riso-Smith-Woollens-Il-Vecchio-Drappiere-Milano-600x577.jpg

Here a brief introduction from "sartorialnotes" :

White man and the Solaro cloth

The Solaro fabric is a product of colonial man’s unsuccesful endeavors. Based on German studies Dr Sambon, an Italian born researcher connected to London School of Tropical Medicine, developed the fabric with the mill Ellis & Johns in beginning of the 20th Century. The idea was to create a garment that unlike past tropical clothing would protect the white man’s body against UV radition as well.

“Now that we know that the noxious element of the tropical sun is the actinic light, and Nature has protected the native by means of a colour-screen analogous to that which is used by photographers for the preservation of their sensitised plates, the white man should be able to adjust himself to the meteorological conditions of the Tropics almost as perfectly as the native . . . With this object in view, I endeavoured to produce a fabric composed of white and black, white and red, or white and orange threads woven in such a way as to present a wrap or upper surface of white colour and a weft or under surface of black, red or orange,” Dr Sambon wrote in The Journal of Tropical Medicine in 1907.

Sadly, it turned out that Dr Sambon’s invention had very little effect. In fact, solaro “was extremely uncomfortable and probably detrimental to health”, an American study concluded.

You can read the whole story in the article European Cloth and “Tropical” Skin (2009).

Spring and Summer fabric for bespoke

Nonetheless, the Solaro fabric was born, and it has become treasure in Spring and Summer for many men, who enjoy bespoke tailoring.

Today you’ll find Solaro in a gabardine twill weave and a herringbone weave. There are numerous shades, for instance red (olive effect), blue, and green.

Besides Smith Woollens I know Drapers carries Solaro cloth, some of it in cotton, I believe.


Some examples:
94772242_921113744975104_517878729825845248_n.jpg
WhatsApp-Image-2018-06-15-at-22.02.41-1.jpeg


tumblr_o8i99g86JY1qgypaso1_1280.jpg

ae4453811f8251eaa5a81766cc1822aa.jpg



The classic colour is the changing khaki, but there are also different shades.
The version of Loro Piana:
11052490_1602444966697622_7305522597964608071_n.jpg


A different colour:
35894341_2123744214567692_7876243243678040064_n.jpg





It's a unique fabric I'm considering to add to my wardrobe. I'm not the biggest fan of suits, but for the Solaro I could make an exception, as it's said that this fabric is not suitable to get combined with others. Even though there's something true in this statement and a solaro suit has a great charm, I wouldn't hesitate to try some bold matches, for example with linen, fresco wool and mohair.

Tessuto-in-Lino-Irlandese-colore-marrone-Ulster-Weavers-Il-Vecchio-Drappiere-Milano-300x300.jpg
Tessuto-in-Lino-Irlandese-blu-Ulster-Weavers-Il-Vecchio-Drappiere-Milano-300x300.jpg
Tessuto-in-Lino-Irlandese-colore-tabacco-Ulster-Weavers-Il-Vecchio-Drappiere-Milano.jpg
mohair-3.jpg
Fresco-III.jpg
 
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Panama

Well-Known Member
Messages
605
I would like to talk about the Solaro fabric.

View attachment 37506

Here a brief introduction from "sartorialnotes" :

White man and the Solaro cloth

The Solaro fabric is a product of colonial man’s unsuccesful endeavors. Based on German studies Dr Sambon, an Italian born researcher connected to London School of Tropical Medicine, developed the fabric with the mill Ellis & Johns in beginning of the 20th Century. The idea was to create a garment that unlike past tropical clothing would protect the white man’s body against UV radition as well.

“Now that we know that the noxious element of the tropical sun is the actinic light, and Nature has protected the native by means of a colour-screen analogous to that which is used by photographers for the preservation of their sensitised plates, the white man should be able to adjust himself to the meteorological conditions of the Tropics almost as perfectly as the native . . . With this object in view, I endeavoured to produce a fabric composed of white and black, white and red, or white and orange threads woven in such a way as to present a wrap or upper surface of white colour and a weft or under surface of black, red or orange,” Dr Sambon wrote in The Journal of Tropical Medicine in 1907.

Sadly, it turned out that Dr Sambon’s invention had very little effect. In fact, solaro “was extremely uncomfortable and probably detrimental to health”, an American study concluded.

You can read the whole story in the article European Cloth and “Tropical” Skin (2009).

Spring and Summer fabric for bespoke

Nonetheless, the Solaro fabric was born, and it has become treasure in Spring and Summer for many men, who enjoy bespoke tailoring.

Today you’ll find Solaro in a gabardine twill weave and a herringbone weave. There are numerous shades, for instance red (olive effect), blue, and green.

Besides Smith Woollens I know Drapers carries Solaro cloth, some of it in cotton, I believe.


Some examples:
View attachment 37509View attachment 37510

View attachment 37512
View attachment 37513


The classic colour is the changing khaki, but there are also different shades.
The version of Loro Piana:
View attachment 37515

A different colour:
View attachment 37516




It's a unique fabric I'm considering to add to my wardrobe. I'm not the biggest fan of suits, but for the Solaro I could make an exception, as it's said that this fabric is not suitable to get combined with others. Even though there's something true in this statement and a solaro suit has a great charm, I wouldn't hesitate to try some bold matches, for example with linen, fresco wool and mohair.

View attachment 37517View attachment 37518View attachment 37519View attachment 37521View attachment 37522
I have never seen Comptors in something like this. Maybe we could set up a GoFu**Me page?
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
6,531
S&M did a Solaro summer suit a couple of years ago that didn’t sell well. I wish I’d picked up the suit when it was in their sale instead of the cream linen blazer I went with. Live and learn.

3E8F9A05-EFA8-4131-84DC-75229E7DAE5B.jpeg
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
6,531
I’ve noticed quite a few brands pimping cotton suits this summer.

I don’t think cotton is any cooler than a light wool or linen-wool blend. I’m also not convinced it is any lower maintainable or care - you’re still going to get it professionally cleaned and not just throw it in the machine, right?

Aside from it being cheaper (and looking it, imo) and appealing to people unfamiliar with suit fabrics, I don’t see the appeal.

But I could be missing something you daily suit wearers know.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
I’ve noticed quite a few brands pimping cotton suits this summer.

I don’t think cotton is any cooler than a light wool or linen-wool blend. I’m also not convinced it is any lower maintainable or care - you’re still going to get it professionally cleaned and not just throw it in the machine, right?

Aside from it being cheaper (and looking it, imo) and appealing to people unfamiliar with suit fabrics, I don’t see the appeal.

But I could be missing something you daily suit wearers know.
Well, I certainly prefer wool and wool blends, especially with linen. Cotton is not so supple and has the major issue of discolouring to the sun and with the contact with sweat (typical the discoloured stripes on the trousers behind the knee).
There are some cotton fabrics I could eventually consider, as this heavy Japanese denim used for a bespoke double-breasted jacket made by Cifonelli for Mr Crompton (sorry, I know that he's unpopular, but I mostly like his style).

Cifonelli-bespoke-denim-double-breasted-jacket-513x770.jpg
Cifonelli-shoulder-bespoke-denim-467x700.jpg
 

Rambo

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I’ve noticed quite a few brands pimping cotton suits this summer.

I don’t think cotton is any cooler than a light wool or linen-wool blend. I’m also not convinced it is any lower maintainable or care - you’re still going to get it professionally cleaned and not just throw it in the machine, right?

Aside from it being cheaper (and looking it, imo) and appealing to people unfamiliar with suit fabrics, I don’t see the appeal.

But I could be missing something you daily suit wearers know.
easier to source maybe? i notice less and less linen offerings here as the years go on. its even difficult to source 100% linen shirts. almost everything is a blend.
 

Sauce

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Messages
379
Zanone icecotton is great for hot days, if its a casual vibe your going for. I've just got one shirt in it, super light but seems hard wearing.
 

Thruth

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I find this shirt very cooling in summer. YMMV. Horses for courses.

1621031193618.png
 

florisgreen

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Messages
1,543
Not a fan of button-down collar shirts, but I like this one in pure linen check cloth by D'Avino Napoli:

Screenshot (251).png


25 process handmade.
 

florisgreen

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Messages
1,543
You get in summer mood looking at this bunch of lovely Italian linen cloths, available at D'Avino Napoli for fine shirting.

Screenshot (280).png
 

florisgreen

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1,543
A nice fabric and a lovely collar, called collo a "bombarozzo". I found that it's described as collo con le vele montate al contrario. Even being an Italian, I can't really understand what is meant. Anybody able to explain it?

Screenshot (307).png
Screenshot (308).png
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
Do you have a larger photograph of this? Preferably someone wearing it
No, sorry. I found it on the Instagram account of Sartoria Ciardi.

I understand that the picture misses a whole look, though I like what is visible: the fabric and the lapel.
 
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