Discussions on Trad

Russell Street

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What strikes me the most about those pictures is the diversity. Not ethnic, of course, but the fact that everybody is wearing something different, even though they seem to belong to a conformist organization like a fraternity/secret society.
There is something meta about this that explains part of the charm for me. The Ivy thing was likely seen by the old-schooler as brash, cheap mass-manufactured trendy stuff, but in the historical context it had enough classicism intact to resist becoming hideously dated. Philosophically, it's an egalitarian notion that, in this modern age, all can wear very similar clothing. But the economy and ubiquity of it means that it is far from a monolithic style. One is not doomed to a uniform, although in a way one can so benefit from the near universal practicality of the staples.
There's also part of me that is citing Cline's Overdressed and the chronicling of how there used to be much smaller clothing manufacturers all over, and many more of them, as opposed to the giant conglomerates of today, some of which overshadow entire national output of yore.
 

Arnathor

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Why the hell can't those azns do up the fucking buttons on a DB, dude, you don't look cool, you look like a twat.
 

Russell Street

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Bump. Having had Natw grill me with questions has brought topics to mind.
Does dressing like it's 1965 mean you are nostalgic for that time, possibly romanticizing it in some socio-policitally reactionary way? For me, sort of yes.
Is the trad thing a manner for men to enjoy clothing without the risks to perceived masculinity that may come with being "fashionable?"
This reminded me of an old AAAC post where this was said:
Trad clothes, even at their dressiest, downplay male secondary sexual characteristics. By this, I mean that they radically de-emphasize the physical model of masculinity characterized by broad shoulders and chest with a narrow waist. Let’s compare a Huntsman style jacket to a sack suit. The Hunstman will have constructed shoulders, harder construction and a very narrow waist. It is designed to convey the message that the wearer is most certainly a grown, athletic man. The sack, in contrast, moves to eliminate any suggestion of shoulder. While the waist on a sack jacket can be nipped in, it often is not and it omits the darts which give the impression of shape. The overall effect is not the triangular, masculine Huntsman, but rather a shape straight from shoulder through hip that is more child-like and less masculine.
 

Arnathor

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I always found trad to be masculine, which is why I tend to dress in that style. Alas, I have plenty of somewhat fashionable pieces myself.
 
T

tosq

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One is not doomed to a uniform, although in a way one can so benefit from the near universal practicality of the staples.
This was the primary sartorial lesson of my high school prep years. Also reinforced during my tour of duty as a peace corps volunteer, where I could be meeting farmers in the fields just as easily as the provincial governor, often without any notice.

The functional and sartorial flexibility afforded by the ivy influence are priceless.
 
C

colco

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I find myself drawn more and more to the trad sensibility, particularly in individual pieces. Heavy double-soled gunboats. OCBD's. Knit ties. I do not however, find myself drawn as much to the tailoring, where I prefer an Italian made garment, particularly for jackets.
 

Russell Street

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Looks like a car coat with some frou-frou button straps and made of that magickal Harris Tweed.
None of my tweed bears any Harris labeling. Can anyone explain over what the fuss is?
 

Thruth

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Looks like a car coat with some frou-frou button straps and made of that magickal Harris Tweed.
None of my tweed bears any Harris labeling. Can anyone explain over what the fuss is?
Marketing, market share, branding. Was all done to try and save the industry from inferior tweed flooding the market. It succeeded. Maintain the cottage industry - home weavers - plus sound business practices. Create supply & demand. Who would eat up this story of history of humble arthhisans? Japan is the world's leading buyer of Harris Tweed
 

fxh

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So...it's a coat. Anyone ever been to O'Connell's? I may be passing thru in the next 4-5 days.
No- but there are good reports from people who have been there.

If it was me I'd call in - spend some time chatting, and getting to know staff, and getting sizes and fit recorded by them and you, and then you can order by phone later with confidence.

Also their online service is great and friendly - you'll actually talk to someone on the phone who knows about clothes and will give you measurements and advice. There's great praise for their Grey Flannel high rise trousers - you may wish to get them narrowed but they are universally liked. I understand that visiting first and then subsequently phoning to order is a good system as they will remember you - its that good. They have a lot of NOS if you are that way inclined.

Their cords always look good to me.
O'Connell's Plain Front Shetland Wool Trousers - Cambridge Grey
 
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Thruth

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They have a very nice selection of coats. I think theynarenthe only seller of a British Warm in North America.
 
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