Experiences make you happier than possessions.

I disagree with the article. I would much rather have material goods that make my life pleasant than travel. In fact, I loathe traveling, especially by air. Of course, I am old enough to remember the end of the era when air travel was still a pleasant, gracious sort of experience--when people still dressed well, and the "stewardesses" (as we then called them) were invariably pleasant, attentive and sexy.

The thought of a trip to Europe makes me cringe with horror. Perhaps if I had vastly more money and could fly first-class, stay at first-rate hotels and such, I'd feel differently.
 
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We will have to severely disagree then. Probably more one the assertion that air travel used to be better, which may be the biggest (and most hilarious) myth of the 21st century. Old airplanes were uncomfortable death traps that wrecked on a very regular basis, with food that was much less palatable than now, and tickets to ride them in coach were far beyond the economic means of 90% of the population. The golden age of air travel is right now.

The other point is probably the most substantial though, and materialism is undoubtedly a very negative influence on society, there is not much arguing around that. I'm the anti-ideologue, uber pragmatist. I have no ideals, they are the refuge of the idiot. So this isn't some crusade on my part, but all major sociological data shows that owning more possessions, over and above sustenance levels, doesn't make you happier, and can in fact make you less happy.


Besides, it doesn't say you have to go to Europe, just go experience anything.
 
in Dr. Dunn's case, money should buy orthodontics
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of course, she would be happy if you bought her book or hired her for speaking engagements

Amazon product ASIN 1451665067
 
I have enough within an hour or two away to keep one busy for a lifetime, so trying to "see the world" is a futile quest. BTW, most of the world kind of sucks and you'd be a fool to leave home to go there.

There are material possessions that improve one's life substantially for the cost, and those that are empty promises. Who here is going to cancel their cell phone service? However, the bucks many waste on frivolous nonsense like a slightly bigger/better/newer item that they already have a fine example of is money that could be put to much better use.

Possessions do start to own you. Every single one comes with a hassle of its own.
 
I have enough within an hour or two away to keep one busy for a lifetime, so trying to "see the world" is a futile quest. BTW, most of the world kind of sucks and you'd be a fool to leave home to go there.

You people are entirely too literal. It means go do stuff.

Most of the world is pretty awesome too, so I'd recommend that as well.
 
I disagree with the article. I would much rather have material goods that make my life pleasant than travel. In fact, I loathe traveling, especially by air.
Of course, I am old enough to remember the end of the era when air travel was still a pleasant, gracious sort of experience--when people still dressed well, and the "stewardesses" (as we then called them) were invariably pleasant, attractive and sexy.

I agree - I hate it too.

tickets to ride them in coach were far beyond the economic means of 90% of the population.

Good old times...
 
Yeah, I'm pretty minimalist and anticonsumerist (except for all that canvassed tailoring and welted shoes and handsewn goodness that the clothing enthusiast indulges in) and am always in awe that there are people whose entire aim in life is a bland luxury car, a big empty house and a giant television. Or people who who have had their life changed by the iPad or DVR or some such crap.

The one that cracks me up is the Andylanders that live in some bumfuck area and have all these questions about ordering incredibly pricey shoes or watches or whatever. How's about actually visiting a city that carries such things with your dollars?

At a certain price level, there is a lot more long-term happiness to be had with simple items. For about the same price, I got a gorgeous Kent Wang pocket square and had a short flight riding shotgun in a Beechcraft Bonanza. The latter was cool and all, but my spirit is more lifted by the tangible item today.
 

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