Fencing?

Dropbear

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Any fencers here?

As a teen, I fenced a lot of foil. Sabre was my favorite (because pirates) though epee was my strongest. Being tall and left handed, it was easy to be a big fish in a small pond - I was a state champion in a few events. Something I never would have managed in a more popular sport.

My son is big on LEGO Ninjago and anything with a sword, so I took him for his first lesson last week.

Anyway, I’m enjoying getting back into the sport - even asa sideline parent.
 

prince nez

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I once sold a stolen stereo back to a dude who turned out to be its original owner on eBay -

oh you’re talking about a different type of fencing.
 

prince nez

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Any fencers here?

As a teen, I fenced a lot of foil. Sabre was my favorite (because pirates) though epee was my strongest. Being tall and left handed, it was easy to be a big fish in a small pond - I was a state champion in a few events. Something I never would have managed in a more popular sport.

My son is big on LEGO Ninjago and anything with a sword, so I took him for his first lesson last week.

Anyway, I’m enjoying getting back into the sport - even asa sideline parent.
A German dude I work with has a thin, crescent-shaped scar over his right eyebrow. He was surprised (or at least I think he was - he always looks a bit surprised with that scar) when I correctly guessed it was a mensur schmiss.
 

Journeyman

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I did some fencing at university, as my university had quite an active fencing club. I enjoyed it, but preferred squash and cycling.

My son's primary school - elementary school, for you people in North America - offers fencing as an elective sport. It's a public school, so I was quite surprised. Also unusually, it offers golf as a sport, as there's a golf course only five minutes' walk down the road from the school.

Unfortunately, I've never been able to persuade my son to try fencing - he prefers to stick with swimming in summer and football (soccer) in the winter.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Fencing is also only second to beach volleyball for meeting attractive women. Tennis in for third.
I had a mate who was practically an unpaid gigolo at the tennis club. He was one of those handsome bastards that women swoon over. He had to give it up in the end as all the affairs with married ladies were becoming a risk.

Rugby's always a good one too for posh totty as is rowing. But those rowing clubs tend to be extremely cliquey.
 

CesareRomiti

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A German dude I work with has a thin, crescent-shaped scar over his right eyebrow. He was surprised (or at least I think he was - he always looks a bit surprised with that scar) when I correctly guessed it was a mensur schmiss.
My father, his brothers and their father have very attractive scars
Did you know that people put hair into their scars to create more impressive results?
 

Journeyman

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My father, his brothers and their father have very attractive scars
How old are they, if you don't mind me asking?

I know that academic duelling was a popular custom in Germany and Austria prior to WWII, but I thought that it largely died out at the end of WWII.

Pic of Otto Skorzeny for illustrative purposes - he sustained the scar while studying at university in Vienna:



I assume that adding hair to the cut is designed to make the scar more obvious?
 

CesareRomiti

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How old are they, if you don't mind me asking?

I know that academic duelling was a popular custom in Germany and Austria prior to WWII, but I thought that it largely died out at the end of WWII.

Pic of Otto Skorzeny for illustrative purposes - he sustained the scar while studying at university in Vienna:



I assume that adding hair to the cut is designed to make the scar more obvious?
No, it still is on if you are looking in the right places
They are all in their 50-60s, except for grandpa, of course
 

prince nez

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How old are they, if you don't mind me asking?

I know that academic duelling was a popular custom in Germany and Austria prior to WWII, but I thought that it largely died out at the end of WWII.

Pic of Otto Skorzeny for illustrative purposes - he sustained the scar while studying at university in Vienna:



I assume that adding hair to the cut is designed to make the scar more obvious?
Actually I think the Nazis tried to suppress it as it was a pastime of the elite - they were national socialists after all. After the war it probably saw something of a revival. The fellow I work with would be in his 50s also.
 
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My son and I fenced for several years. Our club lumped kids and adults together for beginner lessons, so we trained and bouted together. Quite fun.

After the intermediate lessons, they split us up and I moved on to epee and he continued foil. Over time, the shine wore off since we had different classes on different days.

He's strong enough now to start epee, so maybe we'll both get back into it. Our club is a bit dingy and nerdy, not the glamorous and elegant salle shown in movies.

I do love epee. The whole body is a target and no referees. Nothing like a quick feint and popping your opponent in the faceguard to throw them off their game for a few touches. Scares the crap out of most.
 

Dropbear

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I learnt foil as a kid alongside novice adults in a small, dingy club.

My 8 year old’s club is much better. They only fence epee and have a bunch of Olympic medalists in the club. They do a great job in making it fun for the kids, with a mix of games, skills building and bouts.
 
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