Glen Check & POW

Thruth

Big Winter Daddy
Messages
21,636
i dig glen check & POW fabrics. wondering about what you all think. can be subtle or in your face

has been a featured fabric in many Bond films

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I'm a big fan.

I've got several PoW check suits in grey (with a blue overcheck) in both single-breasted and double-breasted styles, blue (with a red overcheck) and brown (with a blue overcheck). I also used to have a grey PoW suit with a brick-red overcheck but I sadly outgrew it.

I've also got a two grey glen-plaid check suits (ie without an overcheck), one in a smaller-scale check and one in a larger-scale check, and a brown glen-plaid suit without an overcheck, too.

I'm looking forward to winter here because a few of the above suits are flannel, including a three-piece, and so they don't get much wear during the summer.
 
I like the grey (or black and white) with a blue overcheck/line. Its about the only thing - other than a mid grey herringbone or flannel suit - that I dream about. (well except for a tan cord 3 piece)
I only have one suit with PoW/Glen - its a worsted flannel Corneliani with a bit of nap, very wet/buttery hand, and with a brown tinge and a pink/subtle red rail line double thick ish lines over check.
 
I like the way they look, but they don't suit me all that well. I just have the suit I posted in the other thread and the Poole house check coat.
 
I just realized that the muted pattern on my old London Fog overcoat is probably this pattern.
The subtle ones that blend out to nearly solid at a distance have always caught my eye. Were I to have many suits, this would be a healthy variation. I like the larger and louder, but I doubt they'd work for me.

I frequently see shirts of this pattern and am always tempted but am never quite swayed.
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Glen plaid/PoW has the added, very real benefit of being very good at hiding marks and stains - great for a slob like me who doesn't ponce around in his clothes on the Pitti wall, but actually wears them while living a busy, untacky, Crusader life.
 
I do like the subtle plaids too where you have to be up close to see it but I would not say "no" to other bolder ones with a coloured over check.

Flannel would be nice as well as tweed.
 
I'm a big fan.

I'm looking forward to winter here because a few of the above suits are flannel, including a three-piece, and so they don't get much wear during the summer.

I've always thought the pattern was more suitable for heavier, or at least corser, year-round woollen fabrics, rather than, say, cotton or mohair or lightweight blends. That's probably right seeing as the pattern apparently started out as a uniform for Scottish groundskeepers.
 
It looks good in heavier or more substantial flannel and tweed fabrics but I think it also looks good in lighter/refined worsteds
 
some comparisons of various fabrics/weights.

Fox 18 0z. London Lounge woolen flannel
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fox woolen flannel 13/14 oz.
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Fox 16/17 oz.
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J&J Minis 11 oz. worsteds 370g
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Minnis 7 oz. super 150s 240g
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Minis Worsted Flannel 13 oz. 430g
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Scabal
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Scabal super 200s 240g
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LL POW Tweed
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Glen plaid/PoW has the added, very real benefit of being very good at hiding marks and stains - great for a slob like me who doesn't ponce around in his clothes on the Pitti wall, but actually wears them while living a busy, untacky, Crusader life.
I'd say you are more on the tacky profaner side than the Jesuit side
 
rambo - I think part of the sarto language skills is the ability to invent new words.
 
This is highlighting the beauty of the lighter blue undercheck, or whatever it is called. I think it works better with cold gray than warmer browns myself. Don needs darker shoes with that btw.
...ability to invent new words.
A gifted neologist indeed.
 

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