Ha! Suck It Vegans!!! Plants Know When They're Being Eaten

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http://inhabitat.com/plants-know-when-theyre-being-eaten-and-they-dont-appreciate-it/


Plants Know When They're Being Eaten and They Don't Appreciate it
by Colin Payne, 10/23/14

caterpillar-on-leaf1-537x357.jpg


Vegetarians and vegans pay heed, new research shows plants know when they’re being eaten. And they don’t like it. That plants possess an intelligence is not new knowledge, but according to Modern Farmer, a new study from the University of Missouri shows plants can sense when they are being eaten and send out defense mechanisms to try and stop it from happening. The study was carried out on thale cress or Arabidopsis as it’s known scientifically – that is closely related to broccoli, kale, mustard greens and other siblings of the brassica family and popular for science experiments. It’s commonly used in experiments because it was the first plant to have its genome sequenced, and scientists are intimately familiar with how it works.

Going forward with the question of whether or not a plant knows it’s being eaten, the University of Missouri researchers first took a precise audio recording of the vibrations a caterpillar makes as it eats the thale cress leaves, with the working theory that plants can feel or hear the vibrations in some way. The researchers controlled the experiment by coming up with other vibrations that simulated other natural vibrations like wind noise that the plant might encounter.

The results? According to Modern Farmer, the thale cress produces mustard oils that are mildly toxic when eaten, and sends them throughout its leaves to try and keep the predators away. The research also revealed that when the plants felt or heard “munching vibrations” from the caterpillar, they sent out extra mustard oils. But when other vibrations were present the plants didn’t react at all.

“Previous research has investigated how plants respond to acoustic energy, including music,” said Heidi Appel, senior research scientist in the Division of Plant Sciences in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and the Bond Life Sciences Center at MU. “However, our work is the first example of how plants respond to an ecologically relevant vibration. We found that feeding vibrations signal changes in the plant cells’ metabolism, creating more defensive chemicals that can repel attacks from caterpillars.”

Via Modern Farmer

Image via phalinn, Flickr Creative Commons and video via University of Missouri
 
This helps to explain why kale tastes bad. I don't understand how on earth people can drink it in smoothies.
 
I knew it! I read some time ago that even some plants have evolved so we can not digest them. Cause usually when you eat them you have trouble digesting them.
 
Well some people are squeamish about eating food that has a face. Or even a name, like Elsie or Fido. Of course this means some greenpeacers are left to eat wicker chairs, but such is their lot in life.
 
Well some people are squeamish about eating food that has a face. Or even a name, like Elsie or Fido. Of course this means some greenpeacers are left to eat wicker chairs, but such is their lot in life.

Who is eating poor Fido?
 
I ate a couple of Fidos while travelling in Indonesia. One was grilled with herbs and was delicious. The other was served in a stew and was awful and gritty.

I was unaware Fido was served in Indonesia. I suppose if I were to be served it I would try it. Lord knows I've eaten weirder shit
 

Indeed.

The first time was in a little town in Oekusi, an enclave of East Timor in West Timor, where the military commandant of a hospital invited us to have dinner with him and his family and he ordered his nurses to lend us a couple of motor scooters so that we could go and get some alcohol while his wife made dinner. When we returned with the only alcohol we could find - a bottle of brown spirits that bore the label "Ingredients: alcohol, whisky flavouring" - we discovered that his wife had grilled up some dog for us that she'd bought at the local markets. It was very tasty, but I couldn't say the same for the whisky. Still, at least we didn't end up with ethanol poisoning.

The second time was up in a mountain village in the island of Flores, where the male elders of the tribe decided to have a feast in honour of our visit, as we'd been befriended by the son of the chief as he was returning from university in Java and he'd invited us to stay in his village. The elders killed a couple of the local dogs, singed the hair off them, chopped them up into pieces and threw the lot (and I mean, the lot) into a large cauldron with some herbs and let it bubble away for about six hours. Despite all that cooking (or perhaps because of it) it was still awful. The most poignant memory of that night was of the elders pouring the stew out into a huge bowl and then trawling through the stew to pick out bits of bone, which they threw over their shoulders into the village square, where they bones were set upon by the remaining village dogs, who cannibalistically feasted upon the remnants of their recently deceased brothers.
 
Indeed.

The first time was in a little town in Oekusi, an enclave of East Timor in West Timor, where the military commandant of a hospital invited us to have dinner with him and his family and he ordered his nurses to lend us a couple of motor scooters so that we could go and get some alcohol while his wife made dinner. When we returned with the only alcohol we could find - a bottle of brown spirits that bore the label "Ingredients: alcohol, whisky flavouring" - we discovered that his wife had grilled up some dog for us that she'd bought at the local markets. It was very tasty, but I couldn't say the same for the whisky. Still, at least we didn't end up with ethanol poisoning.

The second time was up in a mountain village in the island of Flores, where the male elders of the tribe decided to have a feast in honour of our visit, as we'd been befriended by the son of the chief as he was returning from university in Java and he'd invited us to stay in his village. The elders killed a couple of the local dogs, singed the hair off them, chopped them up into pieces and threw the lot (and I mean, the lot) into a large cauldron with some herbs and let it bubble away for about six hours. Despite all that cooking (or perhaps because of it) it was still awful. The most poignant memory of that night was of the elders pouring the stew out into a huge bowl and then trawling through the stew to pick out bits of bone, which they threw over their shoulders into the village square, where they bones were set upon by the remaining village dogs, who cannibalistically feasted upon the remnants of their recently deceased brothers.

Hey, you could do a guest article on Grand Potentate Grand Potentate 's travel site
 
If people are that offended, they could starve. After all, we're not communists. We won't force feed them.

I haven't the foggiest idea nor do I have any interest in stringing up a pig and gutting it but I love bacon, pork belly, ribs, etc.
 

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