I Can't Quite Put My Finger On it, But... (Unsubstantiated Truths Thread)

Zé Ferreira

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As I put my breakfast in the microwave this morning, and watched spin round and round in this little, lit-up box, rising in internal temperature via a frequency of energy undetectable to the naked eye, manufactured by who-knows-where, the unsubstantiated thought occurred to me;

This breakfast is going to give me cancer. This microwave is going to kill me.

All that cancer on the recently-posted infograph? Electronic devices in homes. Or even more pronounced? - just wait for the mass hysteria and resulting law suits against smartphone manufacturers for the dramatic uptick we'll see in testicular and ovarian cancer diagnoses when millenials and cell-phone bearers realize that strapping an electronic device to your crotch via dem skinny jeans is like holding an unstable isotope to your skin. So much IPhone cancer.

You have a hunch that can't quite be proven, but you can't be wrong? You've come to the right thread.

Also, the U.S. would not be in the precarious position we now find ourselves if Romney had won.
 
Wifi interferes with brain waves and causes infertility.
Thruth himself has confirmed that fluoride causes retardation and a host of other maladies.
The carcinogenic aftermath of excessive exposure to the radiation of cellular telephony is turtleheading.
Preliminary science has already shown that diet soda consumption increaseses fattyism.
 
I read in the Ecologist long time ago death rates in NYC doubled when they introduced extremely high power cell phone masts right on top apartment buildings in the 90s. You don't want to keep your cell phone on your body, but worse is people talking on their phones pushed on their ear less than a cm away from their brain. In the early 2000s before I knew cell phones were radiating my brain I used to get massive headaches from it. Today if I'm caught in a public place where I can't be on speaker phone I can feel the radiation instantly and always keep the convo brief, as in less than 30 seconds brief. What's sad is that no one I've ever asked said they could feel it talking on the phone. Zombie apocalypse already arrived and there's no self-awareness.

The term for this is electrosmog and it's killing a lot of people.

Microwaving food isn't only toxic but plain disgusting for taste.
 
Oh, from what I hear (guests on Coast to Coast AM), hands-free devices like Bluetooth are actually just amplified antennae point right to your skull.
I don't own a microwave, but solely because I realized that I barely used it. The science oven does remove nutrition from your food though.
 
I used to use this long time ago but it's slightly harder to hear, maybe not so on current smartphones though.

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I never ever talk on the cell to my ear. Always always headphones.

If you're using a regular wired earphone some of the radiation gets transmitted into your ear/brain still. My friend has a $1500 emf meter and measured it. If you want to eliminate it you need an airphone as pictured above.
 
If you're using a regular wired earphone some of the radiation gets transmitted into your ear/brain still. My friend has a $1500 emf meter and measured it. If you want to eliminate it you need an airphone as pictured above.

What percentage gets transmitted versus the signal strength on the phone?
 
So is this a thread for conspiracy theories and strange ideas, or just a thread for hunches or odd feelings?
 
A bit of both.

It's not a theory though if its true.
Not really - many true things have theories - and some have differing theories.

I think you are saying this thread is about fantasies, thoughts while stoned and brain farts without any real application of thought and /or logic.
 
Office Pants had a link on the FBI's airplanes. A friend of mine, who teaches at a military academy, and is not conspiratorial or techy, brought up something about implants that power themselves like automatic watches and send out low-power radio signals that can be picked up by aircraft from about five miles away. Presumably the transmission is just a personal identifier.
 
Office Pants had a link on the FBI's airplanes. A friend of mine, who teaches at a military academy, and is not conspiratorial or techy, brought up something about implants that power themselves like automatic watches and send out low-power radio signals that can be picked up by aircraft from about five miles away. Presumably the transmission is just a personal identifier.

Um, it's OfficePants OfficePants though. I don't want the NSA missing a post of mine.
 
Office Pants had a link on the FBI's airplanes. A friend of mine, who teaches at a military academy, and is not conspiratorial or techy, brought up something about implants that power themselves like automatic watches and send out low-power radio signals that can be picked up by aircraft from about five miles away. Presumably the transmission is just a personal identifier.

RFID chips? For livestock or people? Kinda redundant with cell phones.
 
RFID chips? For livestock or people? Kinda redundant with cell phones.
It was back when Obama was releasing detainees for soldiers. If you have a targeted asset that might evade conventional tracking, you need direct means.
I think RFID is passive, and only reflects instead of actually transmitting.
 
Didja see them charts? Non-fluoridated areas had cavities fall to a lower level, and a steeper rate, than non-fluoridated areas.
Ball don't lie.
 
The simple fact you assume he even read the article astounds me.

I always see blue sky even the smoke is still obscuring the heavens

Didja see them charts? Non-fluoridated areas had cavities fall to a lower level, and a steeper rate, than non-fluoridated areas.
Ball don't lie.

So you read the actual Cochrane review where the same researchers stated:

“resulted in a 35% reduction in decayed, missing or filled baby teeth, and 26% reduction in decayed, missing and filled permanent teeth.”

Ball don't lie but Douglas Main often leaves out pertinent facts when writing his "articles"
 
doggie - is that after you've fetched the tennis ball?
 
From plain english Cochrane:

Data suggest that the introduction of water fluoridation resulted in a 35% reduction in decayed, missing or filled baby teeth and a 26% reduction in decayed, missing or filled permanent teeth. It also increased the percentage of children with no decay by 15%. Although these results indicate that water fluoridation is effective at reducing levels of tooth decay in children's baby and permanent teeth, the applicability of the results to current lifestyles is unclear because the majority of the studies were conducted before fluoride toothpastes and the other preventative meaures were widely used in many communities around the world.

There was insufficient information available to find out whether the introduction of a water fluoridation programme changed existing differences in tooth decay across socioeconomic groups.

There was insufficient information available to understand the effect of stopping water fluoridation programmes on tooth decay.

No studies met the review’s inclusion criteria that investigated the effectiveness of water fluoridation for preventing tooth decay in adults, rather than children.
-- end quote

Thats not what the Newsweek article said.
 

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