It's always five o'clock somewhere

Fwiffo

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I split two bottles of wine last night with a family friend at Sunday dinner. How do regular people do this - constraining their drinking to the weekends? Horrible way to kick off the work week. No wonder people moan about Mondays.
 

Fwiffo

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I had 7 pints of Spearhead Moroccan Brown Ale. Then shoved off to the Irish bar and had a few Jamesons.

Given I had 3 bottles of non alcoholic beer at lunch I've my fill of carbs for the week.
 

Kingstonian

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We did the Bermondsey Beer Mile yesterday. Various craft brewers on trading estates and under railway arches in a working class area with council flats that will gradually get gentrified. Fourpure brewery was very good. Southwark Brewing Company had cask beer on as well as craft.
https://jetsettingfools.com/london-craft-beer-crawl-bermondsey-beer-mile/

Maltby Street Market sold ethnic street food. I had porridge and a full English breakfast before we set out. No need for more nosh.
https://londonist.com/london/food/the-top-5-experiences-at-maltby-street-market

Lots of unlikely little places selling cheeses, ice cream etc along the route too.
 

Fwiffo

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I had probably three fingers of CC making dinner. Then had 4 double Jamesons. 3 double Johnnie Black. 2 single Johnnie Black. One glass of malbec.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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If you haven't tried any South African gins yet, they are highly recommended, I've not had a bad one yet and the two below are excellent. The Dutch De Borgen new style yet with 19th century botanicals is a cut above most genevers and is excellent with some East Imperial ginger beer:

IMG_1202.JPG
 

Kingstonian

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Had Jawbox Belfast gin in Wetherspoons gin festival. More expensive than their usual premium gins but still far cheaper than gin in other pubs and bars.

Might try Bathtub gin next.
 

Kingstonian

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Both were OK. However, I do not notice huge differences in gin. So I will stick to Beefeater and Plymouth for home consumption and Tanqueray in Wetherspoons. Will never buy Gordon’s on principle after they lowered the strength below 40% . Will not seek out stronger export versions of Gordon’s either.
 

Fwiffo

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Both were OK. However, I do not notice huge differences in gin. So I will stick to Beefeater and Plymouth for home consumption and Tanqueray in Wetherspoons. Will never buy Gordon’s on principle after they lowered the strength below 40% . Will not seek out stronger export versions of Gordon’s either.
There is hard liquor below 40% alcohol? What is that? A strong port?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Gordan's is a nasty gin, try a G&T made with one and then Beefeater. In comparison, Gordan's is all musty tasting and the Beefeater straight and clean. Of the entry level and widely available gins, Beefeater is about the best.

Purchased a few new gins: the Kyoto Ki No Bi, Whitley Neill Rhubarb & Ginger Gin (which I notice is now being distilled in Liverpool, not South Africa) and Brick Gin from Germany which is supposed a neutral taste for mixing. I've only tried the Ki No Bi last night with East Imperial Burma Tonic and mighty fine it was too. I'll make a proper pink gin with the Brick Gin before dinner.
 

doghouse

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Both were OK. However, I do not notice huge differences in gin. So I will stick to Beefeater and Plymouth for home consumption and Tanqueray in Wetherspoons. Will never buy Gordon’s on principle after they lowered the strength below 40% . Will not seek out stronger export versions of Gordon’s either.
Gordan's is a nasty gin, try a G&T made with one and then Beefeater. In comparison, Gordan's is all musty tasting and the Beefeater straight and clean. Of the entry level and widely available gins, Beefeater is about the best.

Purchased a few new gins: the Kyoto Ki No Bi, Whitley Neill Rhubarb & Ginger Gin (which I notice is now being distilled in Liverpool, not South Africa) and Brick Gin from Germany which is supposed a neutral taste for mixing. I've only tried the Ki No Bi last night with East Imperial Burma Tonic and mighty fine it was too. I'll make a proper pink gin with the Brick Gin before dinner.
Beefeater is pretty much my safe go to gin. It was my daily, but I've really got into Gunpowder for G&T. Dont drink so many martinis these days or I would probably keep Beefeater in hand as Gunpowder isn't my favorite martini gin.

Gunpowder is great for Negronis too.
 

Fwiffo

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Beefeater is pretty much my safe go to gin. It was my daily, but I've really got into Gunpowder for G&T. Dont drink so many martinis these days or I would probably keep Beefeater in hand as Gunpowder isn't my favorite martini gin.

Gunpowder is great for Negronis too.
You drank every day?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Gunpowder is great for Negronis too.
It's up there with the best of the modern gins.

I've just tried that Whitley Neil Rhubarb & Ginger Gin, whilst it's not perfume like, or sickly sweet, it's pretty much full on rhubarb and ginger. Likely you would get bored of it pretty quick. I'm thinking of using it like bitters and lash it in with lesser gins e.g. Bombay 1761.
 

Kingstonian

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Isle of Man ales. Okell’s, Bushys, Hooded Ram. Some cracking old-fashioned pubs too. GingerHall at Sulby on the TT circuit and The Raven a bit further down the road. Full of motorcycle stuff, including a map of the course painted on the ceiling of the Ginger Hall.

The Isle of Man Pure Beer Act (also known as the Manx Pure Beer Act or simply the Pure Beer Act) is a law on the Isle of Man regulating the ingredients in beer. It was enacted by the Tynwald, the island's Government in 1874, stating that only water, malt, sugar and hops were allowed to be used in production.The law was introduced after campaigning by Dr William Okell, founder of the Okells Brewery.

Victorian steam trains, Victorian electric train and Victorian horse trams in Douglas.
 
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Pimpernel Smith

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Isle of Man ales. Okell’s, Bushys, Hooded Ram. Some cracking old-fashioned pubs too. GingerHall at Sulby on the TT circuit and The Raven a bit further down the road. Full of motorcycle stuff, including a map of the course painted on the ceiling of the Ginger Hall.

The Isle of Man Pure Beer Act (also known as the Manx Pure Beer Act or simply the Pure Beer Act) is a law on the Isle of Man regulating the ingredients in beer. It was enacted by the Tynwald, the island's Government in 1874, stating that only water, malt, sugar and hops were allowed to be used in production.The law was introduced after campaigning by Dr William Okell, founder of the Okells Brewery.

Victorian steam trains, Victorian electric train and Victorian horse trams in Douglas.
I've never been, I've got some very rich family over there and I know The Who song lyrics. But it has always struck me as an oddity, not only because they use to give the birch for buggery until the 1990s or something, but it's kind of strange as the offshore tax haven in the middle of the dreary and rain soaked Irish sea.
 

Kingstonian

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It’s certainly not an exotic tax haven. However there was enough to keep me interested. I imagine the islanders do a lot of their shopping ‘ashore’ on the mainland. There are no department stores - just M and S. Just one Tesco mostly local Shoprite in conjunction with Waitrose or Coop.
 

Kingstonian

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Peerless Full Whack ale 6%. Lovely drop. £2.15 in Wetherspoon. However, the old guys alliance in spoons gave me vouchers for 'students'. All the grey hair regulars use them. £1.79 a pint. Mentioned this to another bloke I know on the spoon circuit and he gave me vouchers for Spoons that W H Smith give out. It is like getting your customers hooked on crack cocaine. Not so good for other pubs but Kingston spoon was jam packed on a Monday afternoon. Cheap food too. Lamb shank £4.99.

Sorry to interrupt high rollers. Don't mind me.
 

Fwiffo

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Sounds like nothing much has changed then Fwiffo Fwiffo
No, not much. Except the service out here is horrid. Too many part time bartenders and wait staff doing it whilst attending university. No attempt whatsoever to understand what kind of customer they have on their hands. No attempt to ask your name or try to remember you. I said let's get one for the road to one and then the cheque, and she got me the cheque.
 

Rambo

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No, not much. Except the service out here is horrid. Too many part time bartenders and wait staff doing it whilst attending university. No attempt whatsoever to understand what kind of customer they have on their hands. No attempt to ask your name or try to remember you. I said let's get one for the road to one and then the cheque, and she got me the cheque.
Just got to find the regular bartenders and not the college students
 
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