Pegging, Shoe Construction

Thanks for starting this because I have no fucking clue what pegging is when it comes to shoes. Only when it comes to buttsex.
 
What is the advantage? Is it that pegs allow greater control by being discrete, individually applied, fasteners?
 
There is a historical context for the use of pegged construction that carries through to today as alluded to above by W walker . Practical aspects for using pegs include the arguement that it imparts far more rigidity in the waist for something like a cowboy boot where it is needed in the stirrups. Cowboy boots have pegs in the waist and heel with hand welting in the forefoot. Additionally, leather is dynamic and swells and contracts in response to sweat and moisture. The lemonwood pegs swell and contract as well and the argument is that it imparts better structural integrity versus nails. Over time, nails can rust, loosen and fail. Very few makers use full pegged construction or any pegged construction at all (AH makers mostly). DFWII has done full pegged boots but also refers to studies by the US military at in the mid to late 1800's that examined all forms of fastening from pegs to screws and the conclusion to move away from pegged (and screwed) construction. But I suppose that has to be taken within context, if you are making boots for thousands, something has to give so it might have been a best bang for the buck kind of thing. Don't know for sure though.
 
There's an old thread on SF about shoes with pegged soles/waists:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/47823/what-is-the-purpose-of-a-pegged-waist-on-shoes

Post 36 in the SF thread is interesting:

Quote:
Originally Posted by janne melkersson

A sewed waist is more flexible then a pegged, on most footwear that doesn't matter much but on footwear made for heavy duty a "rigid" pegged waist is preferable. In the "old" days it made a difference because the steel shank was not yet common. Mostly the shank/waist area where reinforced with a piece of sole leather, which still is in practice by many London makers, the pegs added strength to the waist. Historically, at least in Sweden, pegged waists and full pegged footwear where mostly made on the country side and in the cities for workers. Welted stuff was for the wealthy people. But as said here, it is also a fast way of making the waist so the method could be used both as a time saver and a reinforcer.

Ron Rider also chimed in with some good info a few posts later:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/47823/what-is-the-purpose-of-a-pegged-waist-on-shoes/30#post_739589

There's also a thread on the "Crispin Colloquy", a shoemaker's forum (which I think that DWFII might have helped to found, or at least contributed to quite a bit) about the history of pegged soles. The information in the thread is somewhat esoteric, to say the least:

http://www.thehcc.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1878
 
Okay, I need to find a picture but this is starting to make more sense.

A few different examples from the Septieme Largeur website, to give you an idea as to what a pegged sole can look like:

SL pegged sole 03.jpg


SL pegged sole 02.jpg

SL pegged sole 01.jpg


I hope that the photos display properly.

I'm sure that there are other photos around the net for different brands that use pegged soles, such as St Crispin's.
 
What is the advantage?

Why wood and not nails?

Wood swells up and seals the soles and has more give and take, but metal doesn't swell and seal as well nor have as much give and take so the metal nail shoes can leak in water after a while. I think the metal would also damage the insole easier when it is flexed where-as the wood pegs wouldn't be as brutal on the insole.

It's also easier to do a close cut waist.
 

because there is less area to work with when trying to stitch a close cut waist, so less room for error and harder to move the needle in and out when stitching a sole to the welt.

Look at this close cut waist. See how there is little room to put the needle in. When you do wood pegged the welt is supported by stitching (hand welted), so all you do is bang the wood pegs through the wet welt and sole and it is done. Easy!

bc7ee963-e8cd-4842-8482-3b228f0cb0b6_zpsxvvwqlxt.jpg

273b9e2b-b616-4e96-b234-ab98394e75f6_zps9fe1azpg.jpg
 
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no, no, the germans are fine, I :fadancing::fadancing: I will contact them now. A bit of wholesale operation they are, but it is not for me. it is for somebody that asked I can locate them for him

Thank you again for you help!
 
the Goetza link was very helpful. Many thanks, but they don't the brass nails, used for monogramming the soles. Does anyone know where to find them?

Ta.
 
the Goetza link was very helpful. Many thanks, but they don't the brass nails, used for monogramming the soles. Does anyone know where to find them?

Ta.

I guess, they are not mutual exclusive to shoemaking and you can find them at a hardware store. there are not so many oldschool around anymore, bummer
 

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