Resume, Job Help, & Job/Career Advice

Pimpernel Smith

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I got a call today from an ex-colleague who's now looking for work and allies. Little did he know, I long suspected his demise in the current position as the company had been advertising for his position for a couple of months. I didn't like to infringe and ask was he still there as he's quite a boring chap with lots of insecurities and now I'm taking him out for drinks and meal and guess I will be picking-up the cheque.
That went down worse than expected. He came up with a cock and bull story about being transferred to Aberdeen and that wasn't acceptable to him so he struck a deal to be made redundant and then selling his studio apartment in his building for a rather large sum of money and various other little snippets of intrigue and lack of a sex life as his wife was going through the menopause. Then he asked me could I give him a contract to show he was in work and he would resign on the same day. Fortunately, I had guessed that the conversation was leading to some request to assist in mischief so it was easy to feign willingness to help out and not be embarrassed by such an idiotic request. It helped I had already had a couple of drinks by this time. Even if you wanted to help: the exposure on me and the organisation I work for would be unacceptable. Even with a letter of resignation you have two weeks grace to rescind it. If we were to go along with this scheme, then the fact he resigns from the position would mean he would lose the very generous welfare entitlement of 70% of salary for nearly 2 years.

The mind boggles at what a predicament he must have got himself in with women, over stretching oneself, remortgaging, etc.
 

Fwiffo

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Even with a letter of resignation you have two weeks grace to rescind it. If we were to go along with this scheme, then the fact he resigns from the position would mean he would lose the very generous welfare entitlement of 70% of salary for nearly 2 years.
Two weeks? I thought if you're gone you're gone. Certainly when the company makes you redundant it doesn't have a two week grace period to realize you are essential.

Isn't there a probationary or vesting period for access to benefits, etc.? I can't even take a holiday until three months from now.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Two weeks? I thought if you're gone you're gone. Certainly when the company makes you redundant it doesn't have a two week grace period to realize you are essential.

Isn't there a probationary or vesting period for access to benefits, etc.? I can't even take a holiday until three months from now.
Here in mainland Europe the employment laws are a minefield and the more they try to tinker and add dynamic and expand the labour market the more moribund it becomes. Case in point here in the Nethelands: if you resign your position, you have two weeks to think about it and rescind your notice. Your last employer is responsible for any sickness you get within six months after job termination. And as I've learnt it is not 2 years you need to pay for, but 2 years + 10 years. So someone who says '''Gis' a job, I can do that, for a day only.....'' isn't quite being realistic.

There is a probationary period before you're entitled to your non-statutory holidays which is 2 days a month i.e. approx 5 weeks per annum.
 

Fwiffo

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Here in mainland Europe the employment laws are a minefield and the more they try to tinker and add dynamic and expand the labour market the more moribund it becomes. Case in point here in the Nethelands: if you resign your position, you have two weeks to think about it and rescind your notice. Your last employer is responsible for any sickness you get within six months after job termination. And as I've learnt it is not 2 years you need to pay for, but 2 years + 10 years. So someone who says '''Gis' a job, I can do that, for a day only.....'' isn't quite being realistic.

There is a probationary period before you're entitled to your non-statutory holidays which is 2 days a month i.e. approx 5 weeks per annum.
I just heard something equally asinine with our Maritime provinces. Apparently after you work a couple weeks you are entitled to 5 or 6 months of unemployment insurance from the government. People sign on to a job for a few weeks and then collect it. Then when it runs out they go find another job and do the same thing. These people are daft.
 

Rambo

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I just heard something equally asinine with our Maritime provinces. Apparently after you work a couple weeks you are entitled to 5 or 6 months of unemployment insurance from the government. People sign on to a job for a few weeks and then collect it. Then when it runs out they go find another job and do the same thing. These people are daft.
they sound pretty fucking smart to me
 

Thruth

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I just heard something equally asinine with our Maritime provinces. Apparently after you work a couple weeks you are entitled to 5 or 6 months of unemployment insurance from the government. People sign on to a job for a few weeks and then collect it. Then when it runs out they go find another job and do the same thing. These people are daft.
Product of the fishing and crabbing seasons. Pogey is figured into the fisherman business model.

Same for those who work seasonally with city works and operations.
 

Fwiffo

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Product of the fishing and crabbing seasons. Pogey is figured into the fisherman business model.

Same for those who work seasonally with city works and operations.
My company is sourcing them for white collar call centre jobs. Still the same behaviour?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Well, to qualify for EI in any province you only have to work between 420 and 700 hours in the preceding 52 weeks.
There's still avenues open for the schemers everywhere. I had a chap today, a Dutch one, who came back to me and confirmed yes, whilst he lives in Amsterdam, he's actually domiciled in Romania, although he's never been there. Bye, bye! Lots of scamming with the marine contractors here too...office workers on seaman passports, lots of front companies in Switzerland - can you please split the invoice between several companies? Despite all rumours to the contrary, if you're in the right industry here, the authorities will turn a blind eye to shenanigans. They're in on the deal.

Meanwhile, my missus has gone and ruined her career in the higher echelons of the privileged EU technocracy. I warned her and warned her that she was firing bullets for other people and being used and the one ally she needs is one she's already burnt bridges with. And I warned her about that at the time! Now her boss is escalating discipline procedures against her and she still thinks someone's going to come out and bat for her. Looks like she's finished in this town big time. What an idiot. And as with anything HR and employment linked here, it isn't going to be an instant kill, it's going to be a comparatively long procedural process before they give the coup de grace. Could be a week or a few, or month long drawn out career death spiral. And I'm going to be living with it every night until it's over.
 
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Thruth

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There's still avenues open for the schemers everywhere. I had a chap today, a Dutch one, who came back to me and confirmed yes, whilst he lives in Amsterdam, he's actually domiciled in Romania, although he's never been there. Bye, bye! Lots of scamming with the marine contractors here too...office workers on seaman passports, lots of front companies in Switzerland - can you please split the invoice between several companies? Despite all rumours to the contrary, if you're in the right industry here, the authorities will turn a blind eye to shenanigans. They're in on the deal.

Meanwhile, my missus has gone and ruined her career in the higher echelons of the privileged EU technocracy. I warned her and warned her that she was firing bullets for other people and being used and the one ally she needs is one she's already burnt bridges with. And I warned her about that at the time! Now her boss is escalating discipline procedures against her and she still thinks someone's going to come out and bat for her. Looks like she's finished in this town big time. What an idiot. And as with anything HR and employment linked here, it isn't going to be an instant kill, it's going to be a comparatively long procedural process before they give the coup de grace. Could be a week or a few, or month long drawn out career death spiral. And I'm going to be living with it every night until it's over.
what was her transgression?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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what was her transgression?
Oh just the usual: bad mouthing and plotting ana' scheming against her boss who happens to be a political appointment which means they can indeed shout and scream and abuse their underlings. And being pointman and firing all the bullets for other people who curiously kept their heads beneath the parapet when the time came to go over the top. They're nailing her as well for not giving the procedural amount of notice for holidays. I reckon she'll be out by the end of the week.

It's awful mate, all the tears and moaning each evening, but the worse of it: I've been warning her and warning her for the last 18 months that she would come a cropper if she continued on the course she was on. Totally ignored and now she's in well over her head in the proverbial and she'll need the wings of angels to get out.
 

Fwiffo

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Oh just the usual: bad mouthing and plotting ana' scheming against her boss who happens to be a political appointment which means they can indeed shout and scream and abuse their underlings. And being pointman and firing all the bullets for other people who curiously kept their heads beneath the parapet when the time came to go over the top. They're nailing her as well for not giving the procedural amount of notice for holidays. I reckon she'll be out by the end of the week.
Why do people keep thinking they can get rid of their own boss?

It never works. It only comes back to haunt you. My aunt did the same thing and they sent her into exile on some "special" project with a staff of zero and a hint she ought to retire.
 

Dropbear

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I'm applying for another promotion at work. First round of phone interviews next week and I already have the bank of 40 questions they will draw from. However, I'm a little put out that a peer will be on the panel. If I get the job, he will be reporting to me.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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I'm applying for another promotion at work. First round of phone interviews next week and I already have the bank of 40 questions they will draw from. However, I'm a little put out that a peer will be on the panel. If I get the job, he will be reporting to me.
Sounds dreadful. I much prefer the: Here's a 20 grand pay rise, you're now the new boss. Hopefully you'll survive and thrive unlike your half-dozen predecessors.
 

Fwiffo

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I'm applying for another promotion at work. First round of phone interviews next week and I already have the bank of 40 questions they will draw from. However, I'm a little put out that a peer will be on the panel. If I get the job, he will be reporting to me.
Wasn’t there a point where you said you wanted fewer responsibilities?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Just been out manoeuvred and shafted on a project. A pyrrhic victory, as they're going to make a complete tits up on this along with the last two they've managed to deliver not to spec and completely unusable. Same people, same arrogant lack of transparency and penchant to screw up everything they touch. Such is life, now bite the tongue and say nothing until the proverbial hits the fan and I have say ''I did try to warn you, before you bitched slapped me down....''
 

Fwiffo

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Just been out manoeuvred and shafted on a project. A pyrrhic victory, as they're going to make a complete tits up on this along with the last two they've managed to deliver not to spec and completely unusable. Same people, same arrogant lack of transparency and penchant to screw up everything they touch. Such is life, now bite the tongue and say nothing until the proverbial hits the fan and I have say ''I did try to warn you, before you bitched slapped me down....''
Are these internal rivals or people you need to "collaborate" with?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Are these internal rivals or people you need to "collaborate" with?
It's a group organisation that because of Brexit, is looking to transfer some licenses to mainland Europe. But they think they can still do it all and it will be just a rubber stamping exercise. Which it won't be. The expertise and authority will need to be transferred to the new entity. They've already pissed-off my country manager who has a masters in patent law and knows the score. They're so going to make a pigs ear of it as they're going to find very shortly ''You pay's your money and you get certificate...'' isn't going to cut the mustard.
 

Leitmotif

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I recently met my new boss, hands down an epic guy with a great sense of humor and who does not micromanage at all.Seems to be like the right guy to grow with and move up the food chain. He worries about the things that matter, our customers are happy and we are getting paid top dollar and we work to live, not live to work as it is for the most part the mentality here in the US. Strange to see that in a huge corporation like the one that I work for.
 

Fwiffo

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I just love the mental image of you going to shake her hand and getting a smooch instead.
She was the reason I got my job. The board member who is another woman was another one I impressed. Jury is out on my Italian boss.

I just get along with women more than men. A peck on both cheeks is not something I am used to with men or women. And I have been in France on a professional capacity.
 

Dropbear

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A good friend (actually my ‘blood brother’ and godfather to my kids) from East Timor is looking for a job outside the country, in international development. He has an EU passport and BA from Oxford. Has worked in Community development in Timotthe past 10 years and was elected to parliament but never seated because corruption. He’s upset the establishment a bit and really would benefit from a sabbatical. I’ve put him in touch with my one U.N. contact but I’m out of ideas beyond that.

Suggestions welcome.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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A good friend (actually my ‘blood brother’ and godfather to my kids) from East Timor is looking for a job outside the country, in international development. He has an EU passport and BA from Oxford. Has worked in Community development in Timotthe past 10 years and was elected to parliament but never seated because corruption. He’s upset the establishment a bit and really would benefit from a sabbatical. I’ve put him in touch with my one U.N. contact but I’m out of ideas beyond that.

Suggestions welcome.
The UN positions are heavily political and country weighted placements, as an ex-colleague of mine found out to their bitter disappointment. But there's always a chance that your country has an allotted position at the time of your application. Plenty of those type of jobs in The Hague with the various Non-Proliferation Treaty Organisations, UN, NATO bodies, etc. Generally tax, or near tax free with lots of added benefits, hence the competition is fierce. A quick Google search and the jobs will be found. The extra benefit, I can become their best drinking buddy!
 

Fwiffo

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https://torontolife.com/city/life/years-ignored-panic-attacks-convinced-fine/

"But underneath I was a mess. Shortly after the election, my marriage of two years ended. To cope with the loss, I suppressed all my emotions. I hadn’t slept well for years, and my insomnia got even worse. When I did fall asleep, I’d wake up several times each night, even after taking sleeping pills, drenched in cold sweat. I figured I was just tired, overworked, overwhelmed. I kept myself together at work, but whenever I was alone, I fell apart. I panicked, pumping myself full of vitamins, running 10 kilometres each day. When that didn’t help, I put in even longer hours at the office, arriving earlier in the morning and staying later into the night. I wore my job like a suit of armour—nothing would interrupt my ambition. I wasn’t okay, but I couldn’t admit it, let alone explain it.

In 2016, I met a writer named Grace. We fell in love, and suddenly everything changed. The armour I had developed was cracking. I was both happier and more miserable than I’d ever been, trying to balance intimacy with denial about the state of my mental health. I started experiencing intermittent chest pains. I constantly felt light-headed and dizzy. Emotionally, I would ricochet from nervous to sad to terrified in an instant. I didn’t realize it at the time, but these were all symptoms of panic attacks.
...
For a long time, I’d assumed I was invincible. I’d thrown myself into work without pausing to consider the toll. Suddenly, I was learning how to slow down and listen, how to experience and process emotions, how to accept that I’m not always in control. To put it simply, in my early 30s, I was finally learning how to be human. And it was terrifying."

Hmm - funny. He started cooking. Chest pains, yup. Waking up several times at night, yup every 90 minutes. Cold sweat, a few times not often. Dizzy, not unless I skip meals. Emotional rollercoaster, I just assumed I'm moody. I use excessive alcohol instead of sleeping pills. It works better. Working longer hours always masks everything.
 
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