Sartorial Stories In The News

doghouse

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Don't know about SF, but I know people who dealt with him directly and didn't like it. He tried to work for and with the company my boss now works for and the story is that Rory not only has a temper but also enjoys the booze a bit too much. He is (allegedly) quite brash with customers (in particular the unhappy ones, see Andrew Yamato), he likes Asian women and literally tried to hook up with some of the female workers in the China workshop.
His tailoring is rather crude and not very impressive and he never made it beyond coat maker level, not even under-striker, so calling himself "master tailor" is a bit of a stretch.
Not surprising, he seems like quite the self aggrandizing fellow. I think he was a coat maker for Poole. Can't blame him for liking the Asians though.

What happened with Yamato?
 

Lord Buckley

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That includes all those fashion bloggers, vloggers and other "influencers" on the internet. These fashion corporations make so much money that they can afford to bid on an insanely expensive property that has a famous address, like any building on Savile Row.
When most of your profit goes towards paying overheads and you still want/ need to pay your staff and have some money left for yourself you are practically forced to raise your prices.
BTW, compared to what a car mechanic charges per hour (at least in Germany), bespoke is dead cheap given the hours that go into the garments.
Ultimately, I believe that prime locations such as Savile Row and Jermyn Street will not be immune to the cultural and demographic changes and they will move increasingly out to provincial cities, outlet villages and online. Most of them are already heavily online. The result will be more affordable bespoke methinks. But then again the strength of the City may still be able to keep it all going along quite nicely.
 

formby

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Ultimately, I believe that prime locations such as Savile Row and Jermyn Street will not be immune to the cultural and demographic changes and they will move increasingly out to provincial cities, outlet villages and online. Most of them are already heavily online. The result will be more affordable bespoke methinks. But then again the strength of the City may still be able to keep it all going along quite nicely.
Cachet plays a huge role in the appeal of Savile Row...
 

formby

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Don't know about SF, but I know people who dealt with him directly and didn't like it. He tried to work for and with the company my boss now works for and the story is that Rory not only has a temper but also enjoys the booze a bit too much. He is (allegedly) quite brash with customers (in particular the unhappy ones, see Andrew Yamato), he likes Asian women and literally tried to hook up with some of the female workers in the China workshop.
His tailoring is rather crude and not very impressive and he never made it beyond coat maker level, not even under-striker, so calling himself "master tailor" is a bit of a stretch.


Blame marketing, especially in the fashion industry. They have been pushing the brand idea for decades and now certain people connect their self worth to the clothes they wear, the car they drive, the list goes on and on.
That includes all those fashion bloggers, vloggers and other "influencers" on the internet. These fashion corporations make so much money that they can afford to bid on an insanely expensive property that has a famous address, like any building on Savile Row.
When most of your profit goes towards paying overheads and you still want/ need to pay your staff and have some money left for yourself you are practically forced to raise your prices.
BTW, compared to what a car mechanic charges per hour (at least in Germany), bespoke is dead cheap given the hours that go into the garments.
An Irishman who has a temper, and likes a drink....? Pull the other one...
 
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Scherensammler

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What happened with Yamato?
Story goes that in return for promoting Duffy and filming the making of the suit he would get that suit for free.
Problem (allegedly) was that the suit was too big and a bit "rough" looking. And if the final video is any evidence I'd say that's true.
The videos are nicely done, promoting the rather romantic narrative of a master tailor making a garment from scratch the traditional way.

Having trained at Henry Poole is pretty much his main claim to fame. But he left shortly after the Golden Shears award and went to New York to teach at the Parson's School of Design. Rumour has it that he was hitting on the female students, which has cost him his marriage (Asian wife).
The Academy courses are held in his late grandfather's house at quite a hefty price tag. Not sure he's good enough to charge such prices.
From what I've heard most tailoring classes at colleges (and even at Maurice Sedwell's "Academy") are basically all rip-offs and the students have not really a clue about tailoring when they eventually get a real apprenticeship at a proper tailoring house.
Poor teaching is one of the main problems, not only in tailoring though. Once you loose the old, knowledgeable staff you are practically left with less qualified teachers.
I took a pattern making class in Hamburg at Müller & Sohn in the 90's. First teacher was a German-Russian woman with a lot of experience.
As it's now common in the textile industry, the majority of students were female (I was the only male one).
Since that woman wasn't handing out participation trophies and I did rather well there were quickly complaints about how she treated the girls unfairly and that I got better marks because I was a man. In the end she lost her job and was replaced with another Russian woman who had just finished the same kind of course and had absolutely no clue, not to mention her poor language skills (also rather unattractive, no wonder they let her leave the Soviet Union.)
So in the end you have mediocre teachers and students and eventually a shitty product, because the people responsible have no fucking idea about how to improve it.
In the olden days apprenticeships lastest a few years and you had to have several years of work experience before you could move on to become a "master" (Meister). Nowadays you can start Meister training in your last year as an apprentice. How is that going to produce good craftsmen and -women?
 

Lord Buckley

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Cachet plays a huge role in the appeal of Savile Row...
Indeed, but when you can get some of that online and some on the Row are getting brand like i.e. No.1 Savile Row. I do wonder. But perhaps online may ultimately reinforce the desirability of the Row and expand it's enticing allure.

In the olden days apprenticeships lastest a few years and you had to have several years of work experience before you could move on to become a "master" (Meister). Nowadays you can start Meister training in your last year as an apprentice. How is that going to produce good craftsmen and -women?
Any apprenticeship without the vocational aspects is only an entry level. My idea of Master Tailor would be someone with the apprenticeship and at least 6-10 years at the pointy end of their craft.
 

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Story goes that in return for promoting Duffy and filming the making of the suit he would get that suit for free.
Problem (allegedly) was that the suit was too big and a bit "rough" looking. And if the final video is any evidence I'd say that's true.
The videos are nicely done, promoting the rather romantic narrative of a master tailor making a garment from scratch the traditional way.

Having trained at Henry Poole is pretty much his main claim to fame. But he left shortly after the Golden Shears award and went to New York to teach at the Parson's School of Design. Rumour has it that he was hitting on the female students, which has cost him his marriage (Asian wife).
The Academy courses are held in his late grandfather's house at quite a hefty price tag. Not sure he's good enough to charge such prices.
From what I've heard most tailoring classes at colleges (and even at Maurice Sedwell's "Academy") are basically all rip-offs and the students have not really a clue about tailoring when they eventually get a real apprenticeship at a proper tailoring house.
Poor teaching is one of the main problems, not only in tailoring though. Once you loose the old, knowledgeable staff you are practically left with less qualified teachers.
I took a pattern making class in Hamburg at Müller & Sohn in the 90's. First teacher was a German-Russian woman with a lot of experience.
As it's now common in the textile industry, the majority of students were female (I was the only male one).
Since that woman wasn't handing out participation trophies and I did rather well there were quickly complaints about how she treated the girls unfairly and that I got better marks because I was a man. In the end she lost her job and was replaced with another Russian woman who had just finished the same kind of course and had absolutely no clue, not to mention her poor language skills (also rather unattractive, no wonder they let her leave the Soviet Union.)
So in the end you have mediocre teachers and students and eventually a shitty product, because the people responsible have no fucking idea about how to improve it.
In the olden days apprenticeships lastest a few years and you had to have several years of work experience before you could move on to become a "master" (Meister). Nowadays you can start Meister training in your last year as an apprentice. How is that going to produce good craftsmen and -women?
darren is doing his utmost

always thinking
always working
always training

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doghouse

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Story goes that in return for promoting Duffy and filming the making of the suit he would get that suit for free.
Problem (allegedly) was that the suit was too big and a bit "rough" looking. And if the final video is any evidence I'd say that's true.
The videos are nicely done, promoting the rather romantic narrative of a master tailor making a garment from scratch the traditional way.

Having trained at Henry Poole is pretty much his main claim to fame. But he left shortly after the Golden Shears award and went to New York to teach at the Parson's School of Design. Rumour has it that he was hitting on the female students, which has cost him his marriage (Asian wife).
The Academy courses are held in his late grandfather's house at quite a hefty price tag. Not sure he's good enough to charge such prices.
From what I've heard most tailoring classes at colleges (and even at Maurice Sedwell's "Academy") are basically all rip-offs and the students have not really a clue about tailoring when they eventually get a real apprenticeship at a proper tailoring house.
Poor teaching is one of the main problems, not only in tailoring though. Once you loose the old, knowledgeable staff you are practically left with less qualified teachers.
I took a pattern making class in Hamburg at Müller & Sohn in the 90's. First teacher was a German-Russian woman with a lot of experience.
As it's now common in the textile industry, the majority of students were female (I was the only male one).
Since that woman wasn't handing out participation trophies and I did rather well there were quickly complaints about how she treated the girls unfairly and that I got better marks because I was a man. In the end she lost her job and was replaced with another Russian woman who had just finished the same kind of course and had absolutely no clue, not to mention her poor language skills (also rather unattractive, no wonder they let her leave the Soviet Union.)
So in the end you have mediocre teachers and students and eventually a shitty product, because the people responsible have no fucking idea about how to improve it.
In the olden days apprenticeships lastest a few years and you had to have several years of work experience before you could move on to become a "master" (Meister). Nowadays you can start Meister training in your last year as an apprentice. How is that going to produce good craftsmen and -women?
I wonder if that's the guy that went apeshit on SF trying to promote Rory and then got all butthurt at people who said his stuff wasn't great.
 

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Your “made in China” clothes may actually have been made in North Korea

We trust the tags on our clothes to truthfully identify where the clothing was made. But they don’t always tell the whole story.

Reuters reports that it is becoming increasingly common for Chinese textile firms to take orders from international fashion brands and then send fabrics and other raw materials to North Korean factories just across the border, where worker wages are much lower, to be sewn into the finished clothes. The clothes are sent back to Chinese ports and exported globally, bearing “Made in China” tags.

A concern for fashion brands and Western shoppers is that in addition to their reportedly harsh working conditions, North Korea’s state-owned factories help support the North Korean regime. Money from exports can even be funneled (paywall) back into the country’s weapons program.

Brands may or may not know it’s happening. “We will ask the Chinese suppliers who work with us if they plan on being open with their client—sometimes the final buyer won’t realize their clothes are being made in North Korea,” one Korean-Chinese businessman told Reuters. Like many of the news outlet’s sources, he works in the Chinese border city of Dandong, where much of the trade between the two countries passes through, and where numerous clothing agents serve as middlemen between Chinese manufacturers and international brands.

International supply chains in fashion are notoriously opaque. A brand headquartered in New York, for instance, will often use go-betweens to negotiate with factories in Asia. If the brand wants to keep an eye on the factories, it must spend time and money monitoring them, or trust the middlemen and factories when they say everything is fine. The scenario is how international brands, such as Benetton, were able to claim they didn’t know their clothes were being made at the Rana Plaza factory complex in Bangladesh, which collapsed in 2013, killing 1,134 people.

Last year, Australian surf brand Rip Curl issued a public apology after Fairfax Media discovered that a factory near Pyongyang was making Rip Curl clothing that was sold with a “Made in China” tag. The label called it a case of unauthorized subcontracting. But the practice is evidently common enough that it’s nicknamed “China plus one” in the garment industry, Michelle O’Neil, national secretary of the Textile, Clothing and Footwear Union of Australia, told the Guardian.

A separate but related issue is the number of North Korean workers entering China to work, including at clothing factories, which hire the immigrants because they can pay them much less than Chinese workers. In those cases, the “Made in China” tag is accurate, but the situation is still problematic for foreign brands. North Korea has sent tens of thousands of people abroad against their will to work and remit most of their income to the North Korean government. Estimates vary, but typically the workers keep anywhere from 10% to about one-third of their wages and turn over the rest.

In recent years, North Korea had ramped up the practice (paywall) as UN sanctions financially squeezed leader Kim Jong-un’s government. Go Myong-hyun, a researcher with the Asan Institute for Policy Studies, estimates that there are about 20,000 North Korean nationals in northeast China alone, working in labor-intensive jobs such as garment manufacturing and bringing in between $100 million to $200 million every year for the regime.

Last year, Radio Free Asia reported that firms in northeast China producing clothes for companies including Calvin Klein and Levi’s had hired a number of North Koreans. If true, it’s also entirely possible that Calvin Klein and Levi’s had no idea, and neither did the customers buying their products.

A spokesperson for Levi’s said the brand does not source from either of the factories mentioned by name in the story. Calvin Klein did not reply to a request for comment.

This story has been updated with comment from Levi
 

ConchitaWurst

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very good post about mahon situation over on fok forum

jolinlovesjunya said:
Regarding the recent news about English Cut and Thomas Mahon..

I think every story has two sides. I do not want to come here to argue with anyone as I am not inside this business, but I do want to tell the other side of the story from the perspective of a customer and friend. I think as time goes on, truth will reveal more and majority of people will eventually see who is lying here.

As I know, English Cut was put into administration due to the fact that Thomas Mahon have been manipulating the money side of the business. It was his hands that made the company “… was put in a vulnerable position.” A lot of customers associate Thomas Mahon with English Cut and consider him as the only figure of the brand. The truth is he cannot do this without his investors who put over $3 million into the company. But his ego grew to some extent that he treated himself as the executive and spend investor’s money in whatever way he likes.

Also, the success of English Cut belongs to all those hard working artisans behind the company, those who actually make every single garments for Thomas Mahon. When Thomas mentioned in his post saying “key staff left with him voluntarily.” How heroic! The truth is only one person who is also his babysitter left with him. EVERYONE else chose to stay with the company they love. Including the people who actually designed the products – chief operation and products, Head Coat Maker, Paul Griffith. I am sure some of you know Griff personally and how he has been as a friend. You can testify yourselves.

Why EVERYONE not follow Thomas Mahon? If he is indeed so great as he describes himself, why he has to lie about the situation? Here’s more truth that may explain why, which Thomas failed to mention at all in his post. He actually tried to force the company into liquidation on PAYDAY at the end of July! But later he found out that the company was already in administration. So he called all the staff in the London and Boston shops and told them three things. 1) The company is facing liquidation and all of them are no longer need. (By whom? Is that you? Tom?) 2) The staff will not be paid for the past month of work. (Who give you the right to do so?) 3) Turn off the lights, go home and lock the doors on the way out. The staff in the office witness all these in person. A month’s wages not to be paid – on their payday – despite the fact that the investor have provided sufficient funding for wages. This was exactly the “grim” that Thomas was talking about. But he only chose to tell his version of story.

I know this doesn’t sound pleasing for our community. But I do think all these people behind the brand of English Cut deserve to be heard. Again, I am not here to bring justice or anything. I think legal process will eventually let people know the truth. However, like I said, you all know some of these people above. Please go confirm yourself if you are curious.
 

Scherensammler

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£3 million you have to really go some 5 star snorting cocaine off dominatrix boots and being bribed to not release the film to blow that on expenses.
If you really want to loose a lot of money invest in the wrong business, play the Forex or stock market. Or gamble it away. Paying your mortgage, fancy car and the occasional, high class escort will diminish your money as well.
Well, setting up 2 shops in what I figure would not be a cheap neighbourhood will have taken up some of that money. Perhaps the landlord wanted the rent paid upfront for a certain number of months, plus the security.
The question is at what point the investors thought "enough is enough" and pulled the safety line?
 

Lord Buckley

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If you really want to loose a lot of money invest in the wrong business, play the Forex or stock market. Or gamble it away. Paying your mortgage, fancy car and the occasional, high class escort will diminish your money as well.
Well, setting up 2 shops in what I figure would not be a cheap neighbourhood will have taken up some of that money. Perhaps the landlord wanted the rent paid upfront for a certain number of months, plus the security.
The question is at what point the investors thought "enough is enough" and pulled the safety line?
Likely, but the deposit would be like max 3 months rent? Then the move, etc. Agree, it's not cheap and if you're in prime areas then you're going to need serious business just to cover the costs.

My opinion is this: that kind of business has to keep in a small niche as they're too small to operate and compete as a brand and their market sector is always going to be limited and will reach a saturation point at one stage where the business reaches a plateau and stays there, nods along quite nicely for a one shareholder enterprise.

The legacy tailors are always going to retain the cache of location and heritage and so you will never take that custom away.
 

TOGLIATTI

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Once got halfway through shooting a suit for ebay when I found the inside of the pants absolutely caked with dried feces. Not sure if it was he or I who had the worse day.Enough cannot be said about thorough inspection in store.
 

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ConchitaWurst

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Once got halfway through shooting a suit for ebay when I found the inside of the pants absolutely caked with dried feces. Not sure if it was he or I who had the worse day.Enough cannot be said about thorough inspection in store.
My wife would always help me at thrift stores checking for certain name brands. She would start in sport coats, then outerwear, and finally ties. One day, while examining a pair of pants, she found some rather fresh deposits in the seat of a pair of slacks. Now, she will only search the ties... period. Plus, I am forbidden to bring any complete suits in the house unless they have been THOROUGHLY searched for dark matter.
 

Scherensammler

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My opinion is this: that kind of business has to keep in a small niche as they're too small to operate and compete as a brand and their market sector is always going to be limited and will reach a saturation point at one stage where the business reaches a plateau and stays there, nods along quite nicely for a one shareholder enterprise.
Looks like it sorta worked for Liverano and Ambrosi. Although I'm sure there are some foreign investors behind them as well.
But maybe that's what inspired Mahon and his investors.
English cut was the (at least one of the) first tailoring blogs out there. Telling all those wonderful stories about Mahon's time at A&S and how he does stuff. He could have milked that a bit more from an ad revenue side. He must have had enough views per month.
 

fxh

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My wife would always help me at thrift stores checking for certain name brands. She would start in sport coats, then outerwear, and finally ties. One day, while examining a pair of pants, she found some rather fresh deposits in the seat of a pair of slacks. Now, she will only search the ties... period. Plus, I am forbidden to bring any complete suits in the house unless they have been THOROUGHLY searched for dark matter.
So the take home lesson is NEVER buy a second hand pair pf Ambrosi trousers.
 

Lord Buckley

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Looks like it sorta worked for Liverano and Ambrosi. Although I'm sure there are some foreign investors behind them as well.
I quite like the signature style of Ambrosi's trousers, with the high waist, pleats and the quirky waistband. But the cost is ridiculous. If I could get a tailor here to do something similar, for the right price, in the right chino mustard colour and grey/blue flannel for winter I could be tempted. But it's a question of which tailor could you trust? I've not seen any examples of anything similar. Might take a look on their websites.

But the cost would likely be prohibitive, I wouldn't pay no more than at a great, great stretch €400. That would be the absolute limit. Would gladly pay €250-300. But that will be in the off-the-peg range for these guys.
 

aristoi bcn

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I quite like the signature style of Ambrosi's trousers, with the high waist, pleats and the quirky waistband. But the cost is ridiculous. If I could get a tailor here to do something similar, for the right price, in the right chino mustard colour and grey/blue flannel for winter I could be tempted. But it's a question of which tailor could you trust? I've not seen any examples of anything similar. Might take a look on their websites.

But the cost would likely be prohibitive, I wouldn't pay no more than at a great, great stretch €400. That would be the absolute limit. Would gladly pay €250-300. But that will be in the off-the-peg range for these guys.
Cerrato and Mola would charge you 350€ in Naples (CMT, though) and I'm sure there are other trousersmakers that charge that amount for a pair of trousers in Naples.

I've just received three pairs from Cerrato and they are comparable to Ambrosi's in terms of style and handwork. My first pair from Cerrato took two fittings to get the perfect fit. Next batch one fitting. Now I'm pretty confident to order remotely.

Ambrosi's prices are offensive.
 

TOGLIATTI

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Cerrato and Mola would charge you 350€ in Naples (CMT, though) and I'm sure there are other trousersmakers that charge that amount for a pair of trousers in Naples.

I've just received three pairs from Cerrato and they are comparable to Ambrosi's in terms of style and handwork. My first pair from Cerrato took two fittings to get the perfect fit. Next batch one fitting. Now I'm pretty confident to order remotely.

Ambrosi's prices are offensive.
350 cmt is still a big fat tourist price
And for m. brosi the price depends on who you are and who introduced you, as always in southland
 

aristoi bcn

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350 cmt is still a big fat tourist price
And for m. brosi the price depends on who you are and who introduced you, as always in southland
Unlucky me, not having neapolitan friends who can recommend me good tailors at local prices. But again, is a fair price when I compare it with what I pay in my city for an inferior product.
 

formby

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I quite like the signature style of Ambrosi's trousers, with the high waist, pleats and the quirky waistband. But the cost is ridiculous. If I could get a tailor here to do something similar, for the right price, in the right chino mustard colour and grey/blue flannel for winter I could be tempted. But it's a question of which tailor could you trust? I've not seen any examples of anything similar. Might take a look on their websites.

But the cost would likely be prohibitive, I wouldn't pay no more than at a great, great stretch €400. That would be the absolute limit. Would gladly pay €250-300. But that will be in the off-the-peg range for these guys.
Its all those bloody buttons in the fly that I couldn't cope with! Imagine, being coked up, and pissed up trying to take a leak with those bloody things. With that 3 mill expenses I'm sure you could get someone to fasten/unfasten 'em for you 'suppose...

...sniff...
 

Scherensammler

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Its all those bloody buttons in the fly that I couldn't cope with! Imagine, being coked up, and pissed up trying to take a leak with those bloody things. With that 3 mill expenses I'm sure you could get someone to fasten/unfasten 'em for you 'suppose...

...sniff...
Would you even notice/ care in that situation?
 
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