Sartorial Stories In The News

Kingstonian

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1,398
I see similarities between Foot and Corbyn. Both are old school Labour whether you like that or not. Corbyn is far less doddery though.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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3,543
I see similarities between Foot and Corbyn. Both are old school Labour whether you like that or not. Corbyn is far less doddery though.
I don't, based on the Malvinas question. Foot, 100% behind Thatcher for the war and liberation of the Falkland Islands, could we say the same for Corbyn? I doubt it.
 

Kingstonian

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1,398
Similar ages when leader of Labour Party. However, Foot was already decrepit, half blind and prone to rambling speechs. So Corbyn has the better of him on that comparison. Foot was an embarrassment whereas Corbyn - to his surprise - has a fan club.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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3,543
The bibliography of Michael Foot:
  • Cato (pen name), Guilty Men, Left Book Club (1940)
  • Cassius (pen name), Brendan and Beverley, Victor Gollancz (1940)
  • Cassius (pen name), The trial of Mussolini, Victor Gollancz (1943)
  • The Pen and the Sword, MacGibbon and Kee (1957) ISBN 0-261-61989-6
  • Aneurin Bevan, MacGibbon and Kee (volume 1:1962) (volume 2:1973) ISBN 0-261-61508-4
  • Debts of Honour, Harper and Row (1981) ISBN 0-06-039001-8
  • Another Heart and Other Pulses, Collins (1984) ISBN 978-0-00-217256-1.
  • H. G.: The History of Mr Wells, Doubleday (1985) ISBN 978-1-887178-04-4
  • Loyalists and Loners, Collins (1986) ISBN 978-0-00-217583-8
  • Politics of Paradise, HarperCollins (1989) ISBN 0-06-039091-3
  • "Introduction" in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Penguin (1967)
  • '"Bevan's Message to the World"' in Geoffrey Goodman's (editor) The State of the Nation: The Political Legacy of Aneurin Bevan, Gollancz (1997)
  • "Introduction" in Bertrand Russell's Autobiography, Routledge (1998)
  • Dr Strangelove, I Presume, Gollancz (1999)
  • & Brian Brivati (editor), The Uncollected Michael Foot, Politicos Publishing (2003) ISBN 978-1-84275-096-4
  • 'Foreword' in Greg Rosen's Old Labour to New, Methuen Publishing (2005) ISBN 978-1-84275-045-2
  • Isaac Foot: A West Country Boy – Apostle of England, Politicos Publishing (2006) ISBN 978-1-84275-181-7
The bibliography of Corbyn is completely empty, but he did win the Parliamentary ''Beard of the Year Award'' six times in a row.
 

Scherensammler

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3,479
Here's a bit of gossip:


Seems Hitchcock Jr. was a bit of an a-hole when he was still at his old address.
"Rumour" has it that he thought of himself to be more important than the other tailors in the same place, demanding preferential treatment when it came to using the fitting room.
Eventually the other tailors had enough of that and kicked him out. Now he's back to where he started.
Funny enough: On Google maps you can still see his old company sign at No. 13 Savile Row.
 

Lumpen

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523
our Doll S a rto might retire from business, check his last 3 post on the other place.

How can I do a pool poll to ask if he should retire or continue? Please post your thoughts, or he has been hacked and some other is posting his post, or he seems another.
 

Jan Libourel

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697
am i the only one that found this creepy as fuck? stop whispering at me bitch.
Missed this one when it was current. Good Lord, that chick comes across like she is working in a high dollar erotic massage joint rather than a tailoring establishment.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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3,543
Really? Will this affect the SF resale market?
All those high street retailers are in rapid decline and cannot compete against online and the outlet villages. From the States to Europe it's the same terminal affliction. I see in the center of the Hague they are now replacing stores with residential and restaurants where the shops use to be. I see this trend as continuing, but the problem is lack of car park space. The demographic who's looking for an expensive apartment or town building in a pedestrian area with zero parking space must quite small.
 

Pauly Chase

Hip Dairy Farmer
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I think Barney's filed for Bankruptcy due to rising in rent and inability to restructure the contract.

Barney's does have some good exclusive pieces. I hope there is liquidation sale coming soon.
 

Pauly Chase

Hip Dairy Farmer
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Barney's does promote new designers as well for the mass population, so I hope this is not the end for them
 

Pimpernel Smith

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3,543
Jailbirds and peacocks:

 

Pimpernel Smith

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The October GQ which espouses the ''New Masculinity'' resplendent with gangsta' rappers sporting belle of the ball dresses is taking a hammering from several pundits and commentators. Sounds absolutely dreadful, but it always was rather a boring and ad copy weighted read:

 

Great White Snark

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464
Glenn O’Brien, who wrote the book ‘How To Be A Man’ must be spinning in his grave.

The decline of that shitrag has been rapid since his departure.
 

Journeyman

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The October GQ which espouses the ''New Masculinity'' resplendent with gangsta' rappers sporting belle of the ball dresses is taking a hammering from several pundits and commentators. Sounds absolutely dreadful, but it always was rather a boring and ad copy weighted read:
GQ has, with the occasional exception, been rubbish for decades. It occasionally publishes decent interviews or general interest articles but you can freely disregard absolutely anything it publishes about clothing as it's either simply following a trend or pushing advertising.

However, it's worth noting that men used to dress outrageously. It's really only in the latter part of the Victorian era through to the current day that men have dressed more soberly than women.

Wigs, satin and velvet, embroidered and bejewelled waistcoats and jackets, lace ruffles, high heels (yes, men wore high heels long before women), tights that accentuated the calf muscles, very tight trousers, powdered wigs and - let's not forget - codpieces.

Even the 1970s, which saw a temporary outbreak of bold male fashion, had absolutely nothing on men's clothing from the Middle Ages through to the mid-1800s.
 

Dropbear

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2,752
What’s surprising to me is that there isn’t any half decent supermarket magazine rack menswear and men’s interest magazine out there. There seems to be enough of an interest in this stuff in the general public to sustain some sort of entry-level twenty-something learning to dress and live type magazine.
 

Journeyman

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There are a number of magazines like that in Japan, but Japan still has a strong print culture. However, even that has been shrinking under the assault of smartphones. It used to be that people on the train would all be reading a book, newspaper, manga (comic) or zasshi (magazine) but now a lot of people just stare at their smartphones instead.

Japanese menswear magazines are great - not only do they have informative, well-written and accurate profiles of various brands, even down to an historical comparison of various labels used by brands over time, but they also have sections for how to wear this with that, or how to co-ordinate a particular item.

I think that role in the West has largely been occupied by internet fora for the past 15 or more years, although it now seems that such discussions might increasingly be moving to subfora on Reddit or groups on Facebook, rather than dedicated fora such as SF or DressedWell.
 

Untermensch

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Messages
248
What’s surprising to me is that there isn’t any half decent supermarket magazine rack menswear and men’s interest magazine out there. There seems to be enough of an interest in this stuff in the general public to sustain some sort of entry-level twenty-something learning to dress and live type magazine.
That would be The Rake. Except it's not entry-level.
 

Great White Snark

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464
What’s surprising to me is that there isn’t any half decent supermarket magazine rack menswear and men’s interest magazine out there. There seems to be enough of an interest in this stuff in the general public to sustain some sort of entry-level twenty-something learning to dress and live type magazine.
I think you may have this backwards as it seems to me that GQ in having so many African Americans from the hip hop world on their covers in recent months is desperately trying to hook in this twenty something demographic who apparently are more interested in the avant gard rainbow-colored garb shown and worn by these folks than they are in what we might think of as ‘classic menswear’. Have you seen the ‘What To Wear Now’ offerings? And the Big Black Book from Esquire has been abandoned I think.
The desperation of GQ and to a similar extent Esquire to find a readership now that their once reliable classic menswear demographic seems in steep decline is palpable.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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3,543
The desperation of GQ and to a similar extent Esquire to find a readership now that their once reliable classic menswear demographic seems in steep decline is palpable.
I think like much of the legacy media, they've targeted the wrong demographic. A wasted emotionally crippled generation is best skipped until the next one. What's six years or so? Dig the next new breed who'll likely be more interested in sartorial refinement. But in saying that, GQ has been shite since the early 1990s.
 

Great White Snark

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I think like much of the legacy media, they've targeted the wrong demographic. A wasted emotionally crippled generation is best skipped until the next one. What's six years or so? Dig the next new breed who'll likely be more interested in sartorial refinement. But in saying that, GQ has been shite since the early 1990s.
Sort of agree although I wouldn’t like to gamble on how many years will pass until something approaching ‘classic menswear’ will once again be in vogue with a significant enough proportion of the world population to get on board. We see occasional upticks like the Mad Men, Boardwalk Empire and Peaky Blinders ‘looks’ but they seem to be the modern replacement of punks / Teds / Mods / skins, with youth adapting the look then shedding it with equal abandon and rapidity. Anything tied in to a TV show has a built in obsolescence anyway as they rarely run for more than five years.
I’m not claiming any deep sociological foundation here, just spitballing and rambling, but I do find the discussion interesting.

It seems that menswear was happy to move at a snail’s pace for approximately a century between 1910 and 2010 but recent years have seen an acceleration in its movement (and decline) and I’m not thrilled with the shedding of suits and ties seen in recent years and the race to the bottom in terms of business wear. People like that Dieworkwear dullard claim that lounge suits were once the jogging suits of the past so we should get over it but I’m not happy to think of jogging suits as acceptable businesswear. I also tend to think that if suits and ties make a resurgence it will more likely be a brief trend rather than a significant and lasting sea change in menswear.

But I agree that GQ and Esquire have completely lost the plot. Their space has been eclipsed by online sites and in the print world by The Rake and I’ve seen similar mags pop up - Gentleman’s Monthly or something and another one recently whose name I forget. They all seem to come from England and even English versions of GQ and Esquire seem much more worth flicking through than their American counterparts.
 

Untermensch

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248
They all seem to come from England and even English versions of GQ and Esquire seem much more worth flicking through than their American counterparts.
If you mean The Chap, it's shite. It used to be, literally, published out of someone's bedroom with a word processor and a photocopier, and it was superlative. Now it's gone mainstream and it's shite. Just another GQ, carrying interviews of celebrities.

There is (or was) too, The Jackal, edited by our very own Aleksandar Cvetkovic. A sort of poor man's Rake.

Jackal, Rake. It's all in the title, really.

That Die Workwear (wtf is this title?) bloke seems to think he's Boyer. Long-winded, full of himself, thinks the universe ends on America's borders, worships the orthodox list of sartorial celebrities, and desperate to squeeze profound philosophical meanings out of anything.
 

Great White Snark

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Messages
464
If you mean The Chap, it's shite. It used to be, literally, published out of someone's bedroom with a word processor and a photocopier, and it was superlative. Now it's gone mainstream and it's shite. Just another GQ, carrying interviews of celebrities.

There is (or was) too, The Jackal, edited by our very own Aleksandar Cvetkovic. A sort of poor man's Rake.

Jackal, Rake. It's all in the title, really.

That Die Workwear (wtf is this title?) bloke seems to think he's Boyer. Long-winded, full of himself, thinks the universe ends on America's borders, worships the orthodox list of sartorial celebrities, and desperate to squeeze profound philosophical meanings out of anything.
No the mag I was thinking of had a similar title but it wasn’t either of those. Something with a similar title though ‘The Rascal’ or something like that.

Couldn’t agree more about DWW - still waiting to see a picture of him to see how he puts all that flatulence he writes into practice.
 
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