Sartorial Stories In The News

belinmad

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I mean the actual tailors. The ones sewing in the basement

Most coatmakers and trousermakers I know in London or around are still busy AF - people like Claire Emerson, Zoey Yates etc who work for big names.

I don’t think it the same client segment. If you are used to paying 3.5-5k for a suit, you are not necessarily interested in going down in quality, perceived or otherwise.
 

Grand Potentate

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Looks like Edwin takes the measurements and draws the pattern, then sends to some place in Eastern Europe to be put together.

So shouldn’t it be called semi-British bespoke tailoring?
 

doghouse

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Most coatmakers and trousermakers I know in London or around are still busy AF - people like Claire Emerson, Zoey Yates etc who work for big names.

I don’t think it the same client segment. If you are used to paying 3.5-5k for a suit, you are not necessarily interested in going down in quality, perceived or otherwise.

I mean I totally agree on the second point. But there's just so many relatively anonymous tailors doing outwork for the big houses that would be negatively impacted. Right now it's wide open busy, but in leaner times they will be on the chopping block. There's been so much effort by the houses to train people up, it would be a shame to see that go to waste with offshoring. And I'm not against offshoring mindless work or anything, but I consider tailoring an important skill to have a pool of workers for.
 

belinmad

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I mean I totally agree on the second point. But there's just so many relatively anonymous tailors doing outwork for the big houses that would be negatively impacted. Right now it's wide open busy, but in leaner times they will be on the chopping block. There's been so much effort by the houses to train people up, it would be a shame to see that go to waste with offshoring. And I'm not against offshoring mindless work or anything, but I consider tailoring an important skill to have a pool of workers for.
Maybe. Again, I think of the product as targeting different audiences. When the local tailors were out of work during covid (I posted in a different thread how I got to work with a few of them), it wasn’t because work had shifted to Poland, Hungary or wherever it is these shops are. Savile Row houses had no commissions (particularly as they weren’t traveling to US or Asia), bespoke, semi-bespoke or offshored-bespoke.

The customer who pays 5k wants “the real thing”, including local artisans. If that clients goes away, then indeed local tailors will be fucked.
 

Grand Potentate

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but I consider tailoring an important skill to have a pool of workers for.
well they have a pool of workers for it. they just happened to be located in low wage earning countries so that the businesses can keep more of the profits.
 

Thruth

Big Winter Daddy
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Most coatmakers and trousermakers I know in London or around are still busy AF - people like Claire Emerson, Zoey Yates etc who work for big names.

I don’t think it the same client segment. If you are used to paying 3.5-5k for a suit, you are not necessarily interested in going down in quality, perceived or otherwise.
this. think of it as a diffusion brand. Steed has been doing semi-bespoke for a while and didn't Mahon do it too? David Reeves too. It is to bring in a new segment of client. Maybe they eventually work up to full-bespoke.
 

The Ernesto

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London’s Savile Row Seeks Revamp With Cafes and Offices, but Tailors Aren’t Happy​

Landlord Pollen Estate wants to add a mixed-use complex to a London street long reserved for its tailors​


LONDON—The biggest landlord on a city street renowned for bespoke tailoring is seeking to add more cafes, retail outlets and office space, a move it says will update this quiet thoroughfare dedicated for centuries to the handmade English suit.

The plans for Savile Row, a 300-yard stretch in a quiet corner of London’s Mayfair district, are running into opposition from some of the street’s longtime tenants, who say the redevelopment could dilute the street’s traditional heritage.

The proposal would entail “completely changing the profile of the street,” said Andrew Ramroop, chief executive of Maurice Sedwell, one of the street’s bespoke tailors. “They’re navigating the demise of Savile Row as a street that’s the pinnacle of sartorial excellence.”The Pollen Estate Trustee Co. Ltd., the street’s biggest landlord, has submitted plans to the local government council to demolish two buildings on the row and redevelop the site as a mixed-use complex with tailors, stores and restaurants at street level and offices above. The plan would require relocating several tailors, in some cases requiring them to move off the street altogether or into second story space along the row.

“We’re doing everything we can to enhance Savile Row,” said Julian Stocks, a partner at real-estate consultancy Knight Frank LLP, which manages the Savile Row properties for the Pollen Estate. Pollen is owned by Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund.

“Savile Row is still dedicated to tailors, but we’re also looking at what other types of users would be great for the row,” Mr. Stocks said. He said demand among bespoke tailors is no longer sufficient to fill the entire street. “We want to have more of a mix to draw people in, but you can’t please everybody,” he said.

Westminster City Council, which oversees the district of London where Savile Row is located, granted the row “protected status” in 2016. That gives the council power to reject planning applications that could change the character of the street. There is no deadline for its decision on the development plans. The council didn’t immediately respond to questions about the application.

Savile Row has been a byword for world-class men’s tailoring since the 18th century; for many decades its tailors have dressed monarchs, presidents and movie stars. But it has been a tough few years for many of Savile Row’s tailors, who specialize in handmade suits that often require several in-person sampling and measurement sessions and months of labor. Fabric is hand cut and hand stitched, and clients often are asked to return for fittings during the process, so tailors can tweak the suits while they’re being assembled.


A bespoke suit can require around 80 hours of work and costs around $8,000. Over the years, many of the street’s tailors have added less expensive made-to-measure services, in which tailors work from premade templates rather than starting from scratch. Some now offer ready-to-wear suits and less formal attire.

The Covid-19 pandemic, when many wealthy clients were homebound, added further strain. Gieves & Hawkes, which has dressed British royalty for 200 years, shed many of its staff during the pandemic. Its owner, Trinity Group, a Hong Kong subsidiary of China’s Shandong Ruyi Technology Group Co., Ltd. entered liquidation in January. Trinity said in July that it was seeking a buyer for Gieves.

More recently, demand for the high-end suits Savile Row offers has returned, tailors say. The strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the U.K. pound has helped significantly, they say, drawing back American customers. While Savile Row tailors typically serve clients on their premises on the row, many also travel to key overseas markets such as the U.S. and Japan several times a year to meet customers.

Bespoke tailors occupied the entire length of the row when Mr. Ramroop, the Maurice Sedwell CEO, first started working there in 1970, he said. There was already a restaurant, a cafe and a dry cleaning and garment repair shop. The street’s first bespoke streetwear tailor recently opened. “I accept that there’ll be changes,” he said, “but I honestly don’t think the remaining bespoke tailors will survive if they keep changing the street.”

Mr. Ramroop’s business has already moved to an upper floor of Savile Row from its previous location, in one of the buildings now slated for demolition.

Another Savile Row tailor, The Deck, made history in 2020 as the first tailor in the street’s history to cater specifically to women. It now also faces relocation due to the development project.

Founder Daisy Knatchbull said she is happy to be moving to a bigger space, also on the row. The Pollen Estate has been supportive of her fledgling business through the pandemic, she said. She supports updates to the street so long as they are “selective and preserve what’s important.”

Business at Huntsman—one of Savile Row’s oldest tailors—is booming, according to Taj Phull, its managing director. Sales are up 37% in the first half of 2022 compared with the same period in 2019.

Mr. Phull complains that some fashion retailers that have moved in recent years fall short of the quality and craftsmanship that the row’s more established tailors represent. They should be ushered off the street when their leases expire, he said. But he welcomes other high-end retailers, such as Swiss watch brands or restaurants operated by world-class chefs. They would complement the street’s high-end tailors by appealing to the same clientele.

The new development should be “done carefully and in consultation with the street’s heritage brands,” Mr. Phull said.
 

doghouse

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ef353b2d8fd9c24dddeca3e4edde4742.jpg
 

Pimpernel Smith

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10,809
The only really dead is Zegna, not the tie.

Mediocre brand.
Use to like Zegna and also Pal Zileri in the 2000's.

As for politicians wearing suits with no ties, it looks shite and always will.

London’s Savile Row Seeks Revamp With Cafes and Offices, but Tailors Aren’t Happy​

Landlord Pollen Estate wants to add a mixed-use complex to a London street long reserved for its tailors​


LONDON—The biggest landlord on a city street renowned for bespoke tailoring is seeking to add more cafes, retail outlets and office space, a move it says will update this quiet thoroughfare dedicated for centuries to the handmade English suit.

The plans for Savile Row, a 300-yard stretch in a quiet corner of London’s Mayfair district, are running into opposition from some of the street’s longtime tenants, who say the redevelopment could dilute the street’s traditional heritage.

The proposal would entail “completely changing the profile of the street,” said Andrew Ramroop, chief executive of Maurice Sedwell, one of the street’s bespoke tailors. “They’re navigating the demise of Savile Row as a street that’s the pinnacle of sartorial excellence.”The Pollen Estate Trustee Co. Ltd., the street’s biggest landlord, has submitted plans to the local government council to demolish two buildings on the row and redevelop the site as a mixed-use complex with tailors, stores and restaurants at street level and offices above. The plan would require relocating several tailors, in some cases requiring them to move off the street altogether or into second story space along the row.

“We’re doing everything we can to enhance Savile Row,” said Julian Stocks, a partner at real-estate consultancy Knight Frank LLP, which manages the Savile Row properties for the Pollen Estate. Pollen is owned by Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund.

“Savile Row is still dedicated to tailors, but we’re also looking at what other types of users would be great for the row,” Mr. Stocks said. He said demand among bespoke tailors is no longer sufficient to fill the entire street. “We want to have more of a mix to draw people in, but you can’t please everybody,” he said.

Westminster City Council, which oversees the district of London where Savile Row is located, granted the row “protected status” in 2016. That gives the council power to reject planning applications that could change the character of the street. There is no deadline for its decision on the development plans. The council didn’t immediately respond to questions about the application.

Savile Row has been a byword for world-class men’s tailoring since the 18th century; for many decades its tailors have dressed monarchs, presidents and movie stars. But it has been a tough few years for many of Savile Row’s tailors, who specialize in handmade suits that often require several in-person sampling and measurement sessions and months of labor. Fabric is hand cut and hand stitched, and clients often are asked to return for fittings during the process, so tailors can tweak the suits while they’re being assembled.


A bespoke suit can require around 80 hours of work and costs around $8,000. Over the years, many of the street’s tailors have added less expensive made-to-measure services, in which tailors work from premade templates rather than starting from scratch. Some now offer ready-to-wear suits and less formal attire.

The Covid-19 pandemic, when many wealthy clients were homebound, added further strain. Gieves & Hawkes, which has dressed British royalty for 200 years, shed many of its staff during the pandemic. Its owner, Trinity Group, a Hong Kong subsidiary of China’s Shandong Ruyi Technology Group Co., Ltd. entered liquidation in January. Trinity said in July that it was seeking a buyer for Gieves.

More recently, demand for the high-end suits Savile Row offers has returned, tailors say. The strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the U.K. pound has helped significantly, they say, drawing back American customers. While Savile Row tailors typically serve clients on their premises on the row, many also travel to key overseas markets such as the U.S. and Japan several times a year to meet customers.

Bespoke tailors occupied the entire length of the row when Mr. Ramroop, the Maurice Sedwell CEO, first started working there in 1970, he said. There was already a restaurant, a cafe and a dry cleaning and garment repair shop. The street’s first bespoke streetwear tailor recently opened. “I accept that there’ll be changes,” he said, “but I honestly don’t think the remaining bespoke tailors will survive if they keep changing the street.”

Mr. Ramroop’s business has already moved to an upper floor of Savile Row from its previous location, in one of the buildings now slated for demolition.

Another Savile Row tailor, The Deck, made history in 2020 as the first tailor in the street’s history to cater specifically to women. It now also faces relocation due to the development project.

Founder Daisy Knatchbull said she is happy to be moving to a bigger space, also on the row. The Pollen Estate has been supportive of her fledgling business through the pandemic, she said. She supports updates to the street so long as they are “selective and preserve what’s important.”

Business at Huntsman—one of Savile Row’s oldest tailors—is booming, according to Taj Phull, its managing director. Sales are up 37% in the first half of 2022 compared with the same period in 2019.

Mr. Phull complains that some fashion retailers that have moved in recent years fall short of the quality and craftsmanship that the row’s more established tailors represent. They should be ushered off the street when their leases expire, he said. But he welcomes other high-end retailers, such as Swiss watch brands or restaurants operated by world-class chefs. They would complement the street’s high-end tailors by appealing to the same clientele.

The new development should be “done carefully and in consultation with the street’s heritage brands,” Mr. Phull said.
This say's it all: ''We’re doing everything we can to enhance Savile Row...''

The rents are high there, which means a significant portion of the cost of your bespoke suit isn't going to the tailors and artisans.
 

belinmad

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London’s Savile Row Seeks Revamp With Cafes and Offices, but Tailors Aren’t Happy​

Landlord Pollen Estate wants to add a mixed-use complex to a London street long reserved for its tailors​


LONDON—The biggest landlord on a city street renowned for bespoke tailoring is seeking to add more cafes, retail outlets and office space, a move it says will update this quiet thoroughfare dedicated for centuries to the handmade English suit.

The plans for Savile Row, a 300-yard stretch in a quiet corner of London’s Mayfair district, are running into opposition from some of the street’s longtime tenants, who say the redevelopment could dilute the street’s traditional heritage.

The proposal would entail “completely changing the profile of the street,” said Andrew Ramroop, chief executive of Maurice Sedwell, one of the street’s bespoke tailors. “They’re navigating the demise of Savile Row as a street that’s the pinnacle of sartorial excellence.”The Pollen Estate Trustee Co. Ltd., the street’s biggest landlord, has submitted plans to the local government council to demolish two buildings on the row and redevelop the site as a mixed-use complex with tailors, stores and restaurants at street level and offices above. The plan would require relocating several tailors, in some cases requiring them to move off the street altogether or into second story space along the row.

“We’re doing everything we can to enhance Savile Row,” said Julian Stocks, a partner at real-estate consultancy Knight Frank LLP, which manages the Savile Row properties for the Pollen Estate. Pollen is owned by Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund.

“Savile Row is still dedicated to tailors, but we’re also looking at what other types of users would be great for the row,” Mr. Stocks said. He said demand among bespoke tailors is no longer sufficient to fill the entire street. “We want to have more of a mix to draw people in, but you can’t please everybody,” he said.

Westminster City Council, which oversees the district of London where Savile Row is located, granted the row “protected status” in 2016. That gives the council power to reject planning applications that could change the character of the street. There is no deadline for its decision on the development plans. The council didn’t immediately respond to questions about the application.

Savile Row has been a byword for world-class men’s tailoring since the 18th century; for many decades its tailors have dressed monarchs, presidents and movie stars. But it has been a tough few years for many of Savile Row’s tailors, who specialize in handmade suits that often require several in-person sampling and measurement sessions and months of labor. Fabric is hand cut and hand stitched, and clients often are asked to return for fittings during the process, so tailors can tweak the suits while they’re being assembled.


A bespoke suit can require around 80 hours of work and costs around $8,000. Over the years, many of the street’s tailors have added less expensive made-to-measure services, in which tailors work from premade templates rather than starting from scratch. Some now offer ready-to-wear suits and less formal attire.

The Covid-19 pandemic, when many wealthy clients were homebound, added further strain. Gieves & Hawkes, which has dressed British royalty for 200 years, shed many of its staff during the pandemic. Its owner, Trinity Group, a Hong Kong subsidiary of China’s Shandong Ruyi Technology Group Co., Ltd. entered liquidation in January. Trinity said in July that it was seeking a buyer for Gieves.

More recently, demand for the high-end suits Savile Row offers has returned, tailors say. The strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the U.K. pound has helped significantly, they say, drawing back American customers. While Savile Row tailors typically serve clients on their premises on the row, many also travel to key overseas markets such as the U.S. and Japan several times a year to meet customers.

Bespoke tailors occupied the entire length of the row when Mr. Ramroop, the Maurice Sedwell CEO, first started working there in 1970, he said. There was already a restaurant, a cafe and a dry cleaning and garment repair shop. The street’s first bespoke streetwear tailor recently opened. “I accept that there’ll be changes,” he said, “but I honestly don’t think the remaining bespoke tailors will survive if they keep changing the street.”

Mr. Ramroop’s business has already moved to an upper floor of Savile Row from its previous location, in one of the buildings now slated for demolition.

Another Savile Row tailor, The Deck, made history in 2020 as the first tailor in the street’s history to cater specifically to women. It now also faces relocation due to the development project.

Founder Daisy Knatchbull said she is happy to be moving to a bigger space, also on the row. The Pollen Estate has been supportive of her fledgling business through the pandemic, she said. She supports updates to the street so long as they are “selective and preserve what’s important.”

Business at Huntsman—one of Savile Row’s oldest tailors—is booming, according to Taj Phull, its managing director. Sales are up 37% in the first half of 2022 compared with the same period in 2019.

Mr. Phull complains that some fashion retailers that have moved in recent years fall short of the quality and craftsmanship that the row’s more established tailors represent. They should be ushered off the street when their leases expire, he said. But he welcomes other high-end retailers, such as Swiss watch brands or restaurants operated by world-class chefs. They would complement the street’s high-end tailors by appealing to the same clientele.

The new development should be “done carefully and in consultation with the street’s heritage brands,” Mr. Phull said.

That's a BS lead. Only one that seems unhappy is Sedwell. The reality is that some of the changes already happening in the Row (ie The Service coffee shop and some of the other stuff pushed by the Cad & The Dandy folks) are bringing fairly good quality foot traffic to the area. I think it's a good idea to keep on doing this - the place was absolutely soul breaking after COVID
 

Sartodi Napoli

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,826
Use to like Zegna and also Pal Zileri in the 2000's.

As for politicians wearing suits with no ties, it looks shite and always will.

This say's it all: ''We’re doing everything we can to enhance Savile Row...''

The rents are high there, which means a significant portion of the cost of your bespoke suit isn't going to the tailors and artisans.


I also used Zileri in the 2000s, yet love their suits and shirts, very Neapolitan style, not Zegna
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Moderator
Messages
10,168

tl;dr: wear what you want. No one gives a shit anymore.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
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4,305
KIWI is dead? Formal shoes to go the way of the tie The Shooman The Shooman et al


I see most people in sporty shoes these days. Not many leather shoes or shoe polish in the shops either. So many want to dress down. Few seem to polish their shoos. What a sad state of affairs.
 

Sammy Ambrose

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,330
KIWI is dead? Formal shoes to go the way of the tie The Shooman The Shooman et al

That pic is of Cherry Blossom. But Kiwi going is bad news. They do (or did) a great Ox Blood polish for burgundy shoes. Okay it's polish and not creme but for colour it's the best.
 

Sammy Ambrose

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,330
I see most people in sporty shoes these days. Not many leather shoes or shoe polish in the shops either. So many want to dress down. Few seem to polish their shoos. What a sad state of affairs.
I tried to buy polish from a shoe shop recently and all they had was those sponges. I started to explain what polish was to the sales girl but it was a waste of my breath
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
4,305
I tried to buy polish from a shoe shop recently and all they had was those sponges. I started to explain what polish was to the sales girl but it was a waste of my breath

Such a pity. Even was l was a little kid, l wore proper black leather shoes, and l would polish my shoes every single night. They were always flawless. No-one else did it, but l always did. I started with a liquid polish, but l graduated to using wax and creams. Even to this day l polish my shoes after every 2rd or 3rd wear at the latest...sometimes just a touch up with a clear nourishing cream or a coloured cream; but no matter what, my shoes are always impeccable without a speck of dust or dirt on them.



Ben Seifert, a human rights lawyer at Temple Garden Chambers. “But the judge can’t necessarily see your feet stuck under a desk. I wear black shoes — Loakes — and I keep on meaning to polish them,” he says. “But I haven’t done it for years.”
 
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Sartodi Napoli

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View attachment 46014


Cue in Sartodi Napoli Sartodi Napoli stream-of-consciousness hate in 3…2…1…. Go


Undignity to publish the names of clients, I have explained this for over 12 years. You even are late for it.

Top Italian tailors do hide it as proove of A profesionality, B dignity, C respect for their clientele. Yours fails

You fail again, narcissist degenerate.

I have had in my hand patterns for top celebrities and by any reason they would have letted me to air the names or me do that undignous degeneration.

They are top professionals and your assholes as that one in the picture who is so fabric reaper that even fakes he "invented" the 007
like cuff that was already existing for decades (sic) needs to air the names of a few celebrities so other ignorants as all the forum knows you are,
go there, also manipulating as if that faker was the real shirtmaker of Cary Grant, instead of what he might ( or not) be, Cary Grant in Madrid
a few days who needed a fast new shirt, or maybe not.

Other of this idiots who even aired in tv the pattern of the ex King of Spain did even humillate him saying over the years he had to mod the patterns due to body deformities of the King. I almost vomited for such a low professionality and wanted the house of the King to call to that lumpen to show LAW and Respect. Instead of it, as he used it as a hook to get clients as you, who know a shit about class, tailoring or even do seem colour blind, I am sure he got more clients to, as you, show off to more ignorants: I go to the tailor of the King, so I am superior ( while the reality is: I overprice for a poorly made rag and make rich a scammer who sells far west tonics in TV)

You are a walking laugh.

Do you know what will happen if a psychologist as me or a doctor will ever air the names of his clients: he will be put a huge fine from the Agency of Data Protection and his professional association will open him a whatever name is in English ( 2 or 3 are needed to lose your licence forever) , also he could be legally be sued by his clientele.

But this undignous real lumpen plenty of inferiority complexes idols of yours and other tackys and undignous as Spanish bloggers are, do follow that indignity.

Can you imaginate the same, a dentist showing the caries teeths of a King in TV to show "he is the dentist of the King", automatical suspension from licence, bankrupt etc.

Can you imagine a doctor showing the erectile implant for a celebrity with erectile fails?

A psyquiatrician telling any celebrity is his patience?

Exactly the same, but in this untailors, degenerates as you do clap it.

As we all know, any of this scammers would ever pass any tailoring exam in Italy, in fact some of their rag pics are put in walls in schools (thanks to me) to show pupils a example of trash. Yes, you wear trash.

His pupil, another degenerate says he is "master tailor".

Can he show the diploma by any real ( non fake Madrid ones) country, as per example in Italy to be master tailor you need to be aproved by a tribunal of the best italian tailors?

All you is a joke.


BTW do you and those ignorants so insecure that need validation of celebrities for their "quality"? Narcissists are weak people who need constant validation of others.


So to be good tailor, a celebrity has to be your client.

An applause
DE GE NE RA TE
 
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Sammy Ambrose

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,330
Undignity to publish the names of clients, I have explained this for over 12 years. You even are late for it.

Top Italian tailors do hide it as proove of A profesionality, B dignity, C respect for their clientele. Yours fails

You fail again, narcissist degenerate.

I have had in my hand patterns for top celebrities and by any reason they would have letted me to air the names or me do that undignous degeneration.

They are top professionals and your assholes as that one in the picture who is so fabric reaper that even fakes he "invented" the 007
like cuff that was already existing for decades (sic) needs to air the names of a few celebrities so other ignorants as all the forum knows you are,
go there, also manipulating as if that faker was the real shirtmaker of Cary Grant, instead of what he might ( or not) be, Cary Grant in Madrid
a few days who needed a fast new shirt, or maybe not.


You are a walking laugh.

Do you know what will happen if a psychologist as me or a doctor will ever air the names of his clients: he will be put a huge fine from the Agency of Data Protection and his professional association will open him a whatever name is in English ( 2 or 3 are needed to lose your licence forever) , also he could be legally be sued by his clientele.

But this undignous real lumpen plenty of inferiority complexes idols of yours and other tackys and undignous as Spanish bloggers are, do follow that indignity.
That stream of unconsciousness is masterful. Move over James Joyce.
 
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