The All-Inclusive Shoe & Boot Thread

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
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2,310
Love the 3rd shoe which is an Archduke Johann model...a shoe dream to get a pair made by one of the Viennese makers. My current last at Attila is not suitable for that pattern, but should work with a Norweger.
Yes it stands out because the craftsmanship is INCREDIBLE!!! Eventhough l don't like the style of the upper with the seem down the middle, the craftsmanship speaks to me like few shoes ever have.

and look how the upper hangs over the waist, it reminds me of this one by Anthony Delos,
Delos 2.JPG


but even the work of the great Delos doesn't sing like Scheers. That Delos shoe above looks like it took great effort, but Scheers looks effortless and is even cleaner in the making.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
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2,310
Enrile good hand stitching of that apron.

How many shoes do you make a year? How many people help you make them?
 
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Enrile

Well-Known Member
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77
Thank you, that sewing needs a lot of precision and technique, it's me personally who does it.
We really make very few shoes a year, just 30 or 40 pairs.
There are currently four people in the workshop and only two of us dedicate some time to the shoe, since our business base is leathergoods, and we spend much more time on this.
We can grow approximately twice without putting our quality at risk, and we will do so.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
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2,310
I well appreciate the artform, so difficult. Not too many shoemakers are able to do it including some of the most famous cordwainers. No guide on the upper for hand stitched aprons, so really really hard to do.

I remember a top English firm tried to do braided norvegese bespoke for the first time and it was as crooked as a dog's hind leg. My new maker isn't willing to do it either.

Silvano Lattanzi made shoes where he hand sews almost everything (or maybe everything) including the upper, and it is such a work of art that it is behind lock and key. I recall he charged 10K + for those in the old days.
Silvano Lattanzi - hand sewn 100%.jpg


My old cordwainer used to do hand stitched aprons and he was the only bloke the cordwainers used to ask to do it because it was so hard to do. He was the stitching expert who did aprons and hand done blake construction and stitched over 3,000 pairs of hand welted shoes back in Italy in the 1950's.
John Shoo 2.jpg
 
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shookt

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Messages
122
Put on some Venetian cream on my shells today, debating if I should wax them. Still can't get rid of those pesky water spots on the vamp...
2020-03-07 14.50.07.jpg
 

Journeyman

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Still can't get rid of those pesky water spots on the vamp...
I find that different manufacturers apply different treatments to their shell cordovan - even shoe brands that use Horween shell cordovan will still have differences between brands. From what I've heard, Alden shell cordovan shoes seem to have a shiny coating that generally resists spotting. Crockett & Jones cordovan shoes will sometimes look dry and dull, particularly across the vamp, but don't show much spotting and, when it does show spotting a good buffing with a polishing cloth usually gets rid of the spots. Carmina shell shows quite a lot of spotting and the spots are stubborn.

To get rid of water spots on my Carmina shell cordovan shoes, I use a bit of Saphir Renovateur creme, wait a little while, then give the shoes a good buffing with a polishing cloth and then a good brushing. After that, they have a nice glow and the water spots have disappeared.
 

shookt

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Messages
122
nice to see them again. How are they going? Comfy?
They fit well, better than any of my other RTW shoes. However, I much prefer the full brogue in black and the burgundy plain toe pairs I posted earlier. Those two are on a more traditional high toe box round to AH last and are snug and comfortable, especially the burgundy pair that uses normal welting rather than goyser. I think the combination of full-brogue and goyser welting loosens the fit a little (compared to plain toe and normal welt).

Width wise, both lasts are similar, if anything the round toe last is a little sleeker at the ball. But the soft square last is a little more elongated, so a little more awkward to walk in. Also, the toe area narrows more dramatically, so its less comfortable especially at the end of the day. My foot shape lives much better in a round toe last, and I'm a big fan of high toe boxes now. The freedom to wiggle one's toes is wonderful. Given my experience, I cannot understand why anyone would suffer an elongated shoe with a narrow and cramped toe box ala G&G deco or similar. It must be pure agony, unless they are blessed with feet that exactly suit that last shape and never move their toes.

2020-02-18 01.37.25.jpg


To get rid of water spots on my Carmina shell cordovan shoes, I use a bit of Saphir Renovateur creme, wait a little while, then give the shoes a good buffing with a polishing cloth and then a good brushing. After that, they have a nice glow and the water spots have disappeared.
That's kinda what I did with venetian cream rather than saphir and it certainly helped, but I missed the buffing step with a cloth. That will probably make a difference, thank you!
 

Enrile

Well-Known Member
Messages
77
You must think that cordovan, at least horween cordovan is a vegetable tanning. therefore it is clarified where it folds and of course it is stained and scratched, but this does not have to be a defect, it must be known and enjoyed. Often people argue and determine, better mahogany than any wood, a mahogany outdoors will be a wreck .... therefore "better" will only have one answer ... it depends
See you
 

Enrile

Well-Known Member
Messages
77
Indeed, it is a special order. The client and I discussed the details, he is a person I know well, he gave me a lot of freedom.
You can see the whole process in these links.

 

Journeyman

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3,339
I really don't understand some people - choose some hideous but expensive leather, have a pair of shoes made for you in that leather, then sell them, no doubt at a massive loss:


I like the shape of the shoes but, to be frank, the leather makes it look as though you're wearing a couple of elephant foreskins on your feet.

 

shookt

Well-Known Member
Messages
122
Those lines are really quite pronounced. Maybe a darker color might help.

On the issue of leathers - anyone have experience with baby buffalo? I'm thinking about a relatively casual pair of shoes but I'm averse to scotch-grain or any other type of embossing. I'd rather have the grain come from the leather itself.
buffalo1.jpg
 

Enrile

Well-Known Member
Messages
77
You have thought about the Russia Calf skin of the tanneries J&F Baker, it is extremely expensive, but it is beautiful, it has a special character and a strong smoky smell.
 

Enrile

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77
I have prepared some pure vegetable tanning leather, obtaining a beautiful grain by means of the twisted and beaten and greased. This for me has only been possible in vegetable tanning. When I can upload a photo.
 

robertito

Well-Known Member
Messages
879
the grain looks different isn't? The Russian reeinder has in my opinion a very metallic/artificial. This one is far more natural and that is has called my attention. It is a very nice veg tanning.-

Quite expensive for sure.
 

Enrile

Well-Known Member
Messages
77
I mean the grain was not obtained by engraving it. The grain was obtained by twisting and hitting the leather on the side of the meat. It is very laborious because it must be done slowly and on different days and with humidity
 
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