The All-Inclusive Shoe & Boot Thread

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
5,077
Clinch are about the pinnacle of hand made engineer boots. The jodhpurs are also nice, but strike an uneasy balance between work and formal to me:

 
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The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
3,125
Now, I am not as much of a "shooman" as Shooey, but I have pairs from John Lobb Paris, Berluti, Edward Green, Vass, Santoni, Ferragamo's "Tramezza" line, and a couple of other upper-tier places. I also have shoes from C&J, Sargent, Cheaney, Carmina and (the horror!) even Loake and Meermin.


Journeyman Journeyman well well well....I am completely shocked at what l am reading here. You own Vass, BIG Johnny Lobb, Edward Green and Berluti??? Where did you get those from? I never knew you owned shoos like that. You really are a quiet achiever...climbing that shoo ladder quietly in secret. I never dreamed you were at that type of level. I thought you were at the C&J and Loaske level, and yet here you are swimming around at higher levels.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
Clinch are about the pinnacle of hand made engineer boots. The jodhpurs are also nice, but strike an easy balance between work and formal to me:

Honestly not a fan of this somehow hybrid style. The sole is too thick for the rather sleek last and the height of the shaft appears odd, not to mention that cowboy heel. In my opinion the Jodhpur style is more suitable for dress or slightly casual boots.

Here two models from John Lobb London and John Lobb Paris:

ss5105-fixed-strap-jodhpur-boot-with-separate-tongue-john-lobb-bespoke-shoes-7576.jpg
pqmqwhhmwky.jpeg
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
3,125
Clinch are about the pinnacle of hand made engineer boots. The jodhpurs are also nice, but strike an easy balance between work and formal to me:

Perhaps the first boot you have ever posted that l don't mind the look of. Not a stunning boot or masterpiece, but it's one of your better ones.
 

Halberstram

Well-Known Member
Messages
92
Update on the heel stiffeners which Vass uses: I have asked Vivien specifically about whether they used Celastic heel stiffeners as I felt it hurt my feet for quite some time rather badly until broken in - she was evasive in response but kindly offered to be able to “add it with leather”. I suppose this means attaching a small piece of leather. I’ll see what it will look like when they arrive.

Nevertheless, it seems that Vass is actually using Celastic heel stiffener. Not great and undeserving of their fantastic shoes.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
My shoes of the day, Carmina 732 Marron Forest last:

20210403_104525.jpg


I know, Carmina has not the best reputation, but I'm pretty happy with mine. The Forest last, providing a quite generous (in height) toe cap requires often a down-sizing: I wear normally a British 10 and the Carmina on this last are 9 1/2.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
5,077
Honestly not a fan of this somehow hybrid style. The sole is too thick for the rather sleek last and the height of the shaft appears odd, not to mention that cowboy heel. In my opinion the Jodhpur style is more suitable for dress or slightly casual boots.

Here two models from John Lobb London and John Lobb Paris:

View attachment 37489View attachment 37490

Exactly. When I think jodhpur, my mind goes to sleek and dressier ( Thruth Thruth has a gorgeous pair, as I recall).

That said, the last picture where they are mostly covered by jeans looks good - the profile is basically that of their dress engineers with a low cut and single buckle. I can imagine wearing these as a summer casual boot.
 

Bardamu

Active Member
Messages
29
Update on the heel stiffeners which Vass uses: I have asked Vivien specifically about whether they used Celastic heel stiffeners as I felt it hurt my feet for quite some time rather badly until broken in - she was evasive in response but kindly offered to be able to “add it with leather”. I suppose this means attaching a small piece of leather. I’ll see what it will look like when they arrive.

Nevertheless, it seems that Vass is actually using Celastic heel stiffener. Not great and undeserving of their fantastic shoes.
Lucky you for getting an answer so quickly. I sent them an email a few days ago to see what they could tell me about their lasts and if they had an opinion on the size I should get.... still no answers. What's their average answering time? If they don't answer I get why they might not be doing so hot, they would miss an easy sell.
 

Halberstram

Well-Known Member
Messages
92
Their average answering time has gotten a lot quicker since my first e-mail enquiry over sizing and lasts. Back then, it was about 5 days, now it’s 2 days at most. I have to say, though, I am quite a polite person and have been charming Vass saleswomen quite a bit. They even agreed to attach metal toe plates to all my pairs while their website says they wouldn’t do so during sales. Maybe I could give you an idea of sizing and lasts in the meantime. My guess is that Vass is more willing to respond when the enquirer is connected to an actual order.

Next time I’ll squeeze them a bit more by asking how much it costs to manufacture shoos with proper leather stiffeners on the heel for me. :fadancing:
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
Does anybody know the legend of Tuczek?

From Italian "Cavalleresco Ordine dei Guardiani delle Nove Porte" 's blog:

Among the great London boots and shoemakers such as Peal & Co, a company founded in 1791 to which the Duke of Windsor remained loyal since his youth (see Notes n ° 5947 and 5948 at the ancient Castle in the clothing notebook), Nikolaus Tuczek Ltd active in Oxford Street since 1853, and John Lobb present in London since 1886 with the opening of the first store in Regent Street, the one which has not yet been spoken about on these pages, as before at the Castle. is Tuczek. The latter is considered by experts in the sector, by historians of men's clothing and by collectors a real legend both for the unsurpassed quality of the footwear, due to the extremely accurate construction and fine leathers, and for the refined aesthetic component given by the line and from the drawing. Tuczek was founded by Nikolaus Tuczek, son of a family of Austro-Hungarian immigrants, who opened his first shop in London at 24 Arthur Street in 1853. It remained active until 1969, when it was absorbed by Jhon Lobb who inherited together with the equipment, materials and footwear still in production also part of the vast clientele, represented by members of the aristocracy as well as the political and economic world. both British and international. His shoes, especially those dating back to the 30s-40s, sometimes still admirable on the feet of some gentleman who inherited them from his father or from other Tuczek client relatives, are considered real masterpieces, studied by other shoemakers and cult object by enthusiasts and collectors. Among the most representative characteristics of these shoes are an extremely slim and clean line with a toe that, due to the harmony of the proportions, is defined by many as "sculpted", the presence on the front (cap-toe) of finely chiseled medallions and the existence in the production of original models with elastic side gussets, associated or not with a false lacing. This last type of footwear, characterized by the ease of being easily put on and removed, is also present in the production of John Lobb who adopted it in honor of Tuczek. George Cleverley (1898- 1991), considered one of the best shoemakers of the second half of the twentieth century, began his career in 1920 at Tuczek where he remained for 38 years before setting up his own business, opening his shop in Cork Street in 1958. Mayfair neighborhood. Cleverley brought back in his production techniques and drawings learned at Tuczek, including the characteristic models with elastic inserts and the finely chiseled medallions to decorate the front of the shoes. The first photo shows a pair of crocodile leather tassel moccasins probably from the 1960s, which belonged to Alexis von Rosenberg-Redé, third Baron de Redé. Baron de Redé (1922-2004), son of Oskar Adolf Rosenberg-Redé famous Austro-Hungarian banker appointed in 1916 baron by Emperor Charles I of Austria, can be considered as one of the last great European aesthetes and one of the men most elegant of the twentieth century. He moved to the USA at the age of 18 due to the Nazi persecution and in 1946 he returned to Europe together with the painter Salvador Dali ', with whom he had a very long association, settling in Paris. Here he lived in the ground floor apartments of the seventeenth-century Hotel Lambert on the island of Saint-Louis, starting the restoration which was later completed by Baron Guy de Rothschild and his wife Marie-Hélène following their purchase of the entire building in 1975.
Refined homosexual, thanks to the fact that he became the lover of the very wealthy Chilean industrialist Arturo Lopez-Wilshaw from whom he had a considerable prerogative in life and half of the inheritance at his death, he represented one of the points of reference starting immediately after the war of the social, artistic and cultural life of Paris (note his friendship with Jean Cocteau), acquiring wide fame for his luxurious masquerade parties, including the legendary Bal Oriental held at the Hotel Lambert on December 5, 1969. The Hotel Lambert was decorated for the occasion on the theme of the Thousand and One Nights, and in his rooms there were scents of myrrh and jasmine. Two enormous papier-mache elephants adorned the courtyard, while two Hindu musicians and sixteen men, dressed as Nubian slaves holding torches, were placed on the entrance staircase; de Redé himself wore a Mughal prince costume made by Pierre Cardin. Thanks to the relationships established in these festivals, which saw the participation not only of exponents of the European aristocracy including the Dukes of Windsor but also of important representatives of the world of finance, culture, fashion (Pierre Cardin and Yves Saint Laurent were launched by de Redé), of cinema and of what we now define as the international jet set, de Redé was able to expand its already considerable assets with fruitful investments. The next two images (second and third photos) give us a testimony of Alexis de Redé's elegance: the first, dating back to 1968, shows him in Paris in a magnificent gray morning suit and top hat together with Maria Callas, Liz taylor and Richard Burton; in the second we see him in his apartments at the Lambert Hotel wearing a dark suit with a double-breasted "Duke of Kent" jacket. After the death of Tuczek, Baron de Redè became a client of George Cleverley, in whose collection there is a model of tassel loafers called De Redé (fourth photo), testifying to the Baron's predilection for this type of footwear.

download (1).jpg
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The following photos show some models produced by Tuczek, most of which are owned by an English collector who inherited them from his uncle. The models date back to a vast period between 1938 and 1969 as detectable, when still clearly evident, from the branded labels inside the shoes bearing the address of the headquarters which was from 1938 to 1966 at 17 Clifford Street ( fifth photo) and from 1966 to 1969 at 21 Jermyn Street (sixth photo). This last labeling belongs to a pair of wholecut oxfords in blue suede (seventh photo) which therefore can be dated between 1966 and 1969. In the photos from the eighth to the seventeenth are respectively portrayed:

single strap monks in chocolate brown suede,

side gusset slips on black lizard,

side gussets slips on brown crocodile,

side gusset full brogues with false black lizard laces,

half brogue oxfords in brown calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue derbys with two holes in brown calfskin,

half brogue spectators white and brown,

full brogue spectators white and brown.

download (12).jpg
download (11).jpg
download (10).jpg
download (9).jpg
download (8).jpg
download (7).jpg
download (6).jpg
download (5).jpg
download (4).jpg
download (3).jpg
 

Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
125
I had heard of Tuczek but not seen much of his/their work. I love those croc tassel loafers and the brown semibrogue (beneath the lazyman) which reminds me of something you might see from an Italian shoemaker like Angelo Gatto.
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
7,164
https://www.mentalfloss.com/section/history
The Footwear that Helped Moonshiners Evade Police
BY CAITLIN SCHNEIDER JUNE 15, 2015
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

During the Prohibition Era, moonshiners had to be pretty crafty to keep their activities under wraps. Still, the authorities were bound to sniff them out from time to time, so distillers and smugglers crafted a clever getaway vehicle: cow shoes. These pieces of fancy footwear would leave hoofprints instead of footprints, which no policeman would think to pursue unless there was some sort of hooch horse on the loose.
A 1922 article from a Florida newspaper called The Evening Independent ran a piece on the development:
Tampa, May 27.—A new method of evading prohibition agents was revealed here today by A.L. Allen, state prohibition enforcement director, who displayed what he called a "cow shoe" as the latest thing from the haunts of moonshiners.
The cow shoe is a strip of metal to which is tacked a wooden block carved to resemble the hoof of a cow, which may be strapped to the human foot. A man shod with a pair of them would leave a trail resembling that of a cow.
The shoe found was picked up near Port Tampa where a still was located some time ago. It will be sent to the prohibition department at Washington. Officers believe the inventor got his idea from a Sherlock Holmes story in which the villain shod his horse with shoes the imprint of which resembled those of a cow's hoof.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
3,125
Does anybody know the legend of Tuczek?

From Italian "Cavalleresco Ordine dei Guardiani delle Nove Porte" 's blog:

Among the great London boots and shoemakers such as Peal & Co, a company founded in 1791 to which the Duke of Windsor remained loyal since his youth (see Notes n ° 5947 and 5948 at the ancient Castle in the clothing notebook), Nikolaus Tuczek Ltd active in Oxford Street since 1853, and John Lobb present in London since 1886 with the opening of the first store in Regent Street, the one which has not yet been spoken about on these pages, as before at the Castle. is Tuczek. The latter is considered by experts in the sector, by historians of men's clothing and by collectors a real legend both for the unsurpassed quality of the footwear, due to the extremely accurate construction and fine leathers, and for the refined aesthetic component given by the line and from the drawing. Tuczek was founded by Nikolaus Tuczek, son of a family of Austro-Hungarian immigrants, who opened his first shop in London at 24 Arthur Street in 1853. It remained active until 1969, when it was absorbed by Jhon Lobb who inherited together with the equipment, materials and footwear still in production also part of the vast clientele, represented by members of the aristocracy as well as the political and economic world. both British and international. His shoes, especially those dating back to the 30s-40s, sometimes still admirable on the feet of some gentleman who inherited them from his father or from other Tuczek client relatives, are considered real masterpieces, studied by other shoemakers and cult object by enthusiasts and collectors. Among the most representative characteristics of these shoes are an extremely slim and clean line with a toe that, due to the harmony of the proportions, is defined by many as "sculpted", the presence on the front (cap-toe) of finely chiseled medallions and the existence in the production of original models with elastic side gussets, associated or not with a false lacing. This last type of footwear, characterized by the ease of being easily put on and removed, is also present in the production of John Lobb who adopted it in honor of Tuczek. George Cleverley (1898- 1991), considered one of the best shoemakers of the second half of the twentieth century, began his career in 1920 at Tuczek where he remained for 38 years before setting up his own business, opening his shop in Cork Street in 1958. Mayfair neighborhood. Cleverley brought back in his production techniques and drawings learned at Tuczek, including the characteristic models with elastic inserts and the finely chiseled medallions to decorate the front of the shoes. The first photo shows a pair of crocodile leather tassel moccasins probably from the 1960s, which belonged to Alexis von Rosenberg-Redé, third Baron de Redé. Baron de Redé (1922-2004), son of Oskar Adolf Rosenberg-Redé famous Austro-Hungarian banker appointed in 1916 baron by Emperor Charles I of Austria, can be considered as one of the last great European aesthetes and one of the men most elegant of the twentieth century. He moved to the USA at the age of 18 due to the Nazi persecution and in 1946 he returned to Europe together with the painter Salvador Dali ', with whom he had a very long association, settling in Paris. Here he lived in the ground floor apartments of the seventeenth-century Hotel Lambert on the island of Saint-Louis, starting the restoration which was later completed by Baron Guy de Rothschild and his wife Marie-Hélène following their purchase of the entire building in 1975.
Refined homosexual, thanks to the fact that he became the lover of the very wealthy Chilean industrialist Arturo Lopez-Wilshaw from whom he had a considerable prerogative in life and half of the inheritance at his death, he represented one of the points of reference starting immediately after the war of the social, artistic and cultural life of Paris (note his friendship with Jean Cocteau), acquiring wide fame for his luxurious masquerade parties, including the legendary Bal Oriental held at the Hotel Lambert on December 5, 1969. The Hotel Lambert was decorated for the occasion on the theme of the Thousand and One Nights, and in his rooms there were scents of myrrh and jasmine. Two enormous papier-mache elephants adorned the courtyard, while two Hindu musicians and sixteen men, dressed as Nubian slaves holding torches, were placed on the entrance staircase; de Redé himself wore a Mughal prince costume made by Pierre Cardin. Thanks to the relationships established in these festivals, which saw the participation not only of exponents of the European aristocracy including the Dukes of Windsor but also of important representatives of the world of finance, culture, fashion (Pierre Cardin and Yves Saint Laurent were launched by de Redé), of cinema and of what we now define as the international jet set, de Redé was able to expand its already considerable assets with fruitful investments. The next two images (second and third photos) give us a testimony of Alexis de Redé's elegance: the first, dating back to 1968, shows him in Paris in a magnificent gray morning suit and top hat together with Maria Callas, Liz taylor and Richard Burton; in the second we see him in his apartments at the Lambert Hotel wearing a dark suit with a double-breasted "Duke of Kent" jacket. After the death of Tuczek, Baron de Redè became a client of George Cleverley, in whose collection there is a model of tassel loafers called De Redé (fourth photo), testifying to the Baron's predilection for this type of footwear.

View attachment 37494View attachment 37495

The following photos show some models produced by Tuczek, most of which are owned by an English collector who inherited them from his uncle. The models date back to a vast period between 1938 and 1969 as detectable, when still clearly evident, from the branded labels inside the shoes bearing the address of the headquarters which was from 1938 to 1966 at 17 Clifford Street ( fifth photo) and from 1966 to 1969 at 21 Jermyn Street (sixth photo). This last labeling belongs to a pair of wholecut oxfords in blue suede (seventh photo) which therefore can be dated between 1966 and 1969. In the photos from the eighth to the seventeenth are respectively portrayed:

single strap monks in chocolate brown suede,

side gusset slips on black lizard,

side gussets slips on brown crocodile,

side gusset full brogues with false black lizard laces,

half brogue oxfords in brown calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue derbys with two holes in brown calfskin,

half brogue spectators white and brown,

full brogue spectators white and brown.


Tuczek was an eighth wonder of the world, and his influence on Cleverley was strong. The Cleverley styling is like nothing else, and it is amazing how it transforms feet. I remember wanting my chisel last being wider at the toe, but Cleverley simply wouldn't have it, they insisted on it being done their way. It was later that l began to understand the `Cleverley last'...a hallmark of utter elegance and grandeur suited for fancy noblemen and upperclass men of note, that's how smart their shoes are. They are a society shoemaker, they make light fancy shoes for prouncing around like an elite. Nearly all their shoes are like that...like from a fantasy story, these super elegant shoes that look different from anything else, with the small heel and ELONGATED WAIST and overall smallness that is their signiture style. The photos never capture the true character of Cleverley, you only see it when you see the shoes and put them on. These shoes are not for average men, and l think a lot of forum folks (including myself at the time) don't understand that. That is why they chase famous people and always talk about their rich clients and prefer the customers who order dozens of pairs. They don't have much time for the average guy. The igents, being a democratic lot, want to be part of this world, so they buy into it, but they will always be outsiders. Luckily for me l got the `special treatment' as numerous long term clients told me, and that is rare, but it didn't happen by accident, certain signals had to be sent to let them know. It is like with Beau Brummel....if you are not an insider, you have to give signals to get treated like an elite....this is what l had to do.

I also talked about the Anthony Cleverley shoes years ago here too. It took Cleverley 3 years to craft that chisel last, and no-one makes a shoe in a shape like that. It is classic Cleverley and transforms feet 6 feet away into elegant works of art....looks bespoke. As great as John Lobb is in making great lasts, they can't touch the Anthony Cleverley masterpiece, neither can G&G or E.G, most are miles behind that. Cleverley have the special DNA.

For me Cleverley are too light and fancy, but l appreciate them and their influences, and l appreciate the aristocratic look they achieve as a society shoemaker. For the right type of person, and when pushed, they can still make some of the finest shoes in the world when their top cordwainer takes the extra time for very discerning clients. They can fit like a second skin when fitted right and make the feet look 2 sizes smaller. These are not shoes for your average joe, the DNA comes from an era when society men dressed elegantly in the city, and this shoo represents the ultimate in high status. John Lobb is much different again, it is not fancy pants, it is very solid and conservative with no fancy prouncing around.
 
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Thruth

Created the finest posts in internet forum history
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20,352
The Shooman The Shooman , I thought I would show you my issue with the U last so I dug them out of their boxes. I am a 42 in the Vass F with narrow heel and not a high instep. The U last in 42.5 fits my right foot quite well. My left foot is larger and slightly wider than the right. Thin dress socks.

On the left foot, the width of the U last and the tighter fit across the ball of the foot = small circumference = discomfort now for anatomical reasons but even years ago I walked 80 blocks in NYC in them and the killed my left foot with pain across the ball as well as beneath.

It is fine across the vamp and with my narrow heel there is mild heel slip.



1620187926070.png

Here is the swan's neck whole cut.
1620189006651.jpeg

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Compared to the Adelaides. They actually fit a bit more generously than the whole cut.

1620189315816.jpeg



1620189856902.jpeg


Narrower width + smaller ball circumference = not good.
1620190281354.jpeg

Toe space

1620190113828.jpeg
 

Panama

Well-Known Member
Messages
194
Does anybody know the legend of Tuczek?

From Italian "Cavalleresco Ordine dei Guardiani delle Nove Porte" 's blog:

Among the great London boots and shoemakers such as Peal & Co, a company founded in 1791 to which the Duke of Windsor remained loyal since his youth (see Notes n ° 5947 and 5948 at the ancient Castle in the clothing notebook), Nikolaus Tuczek Ltd active in Oxford Street since 1853, and John Lobb present in London since 1886 with the opening of the first store in Regent Street, the one which has not yet been spoken about on these pages, as before at the Castle. is Tuczek. The latter is considered by experts in the sector, by historians of men's clothing and by collectors a real legend both for the unsurpassed quality of the footwear, due to the extremely accurate construction and fine leathers, and for the refined aesthetic component given by the line and from the drawing. Tuczek was founded by Nikolaus Tuczek, son of a family of Austro-Hungarian immigrants, who opened his first shop in London at 24 Arthur Street in 1853. It remained active until 1969, when it was absorbed by Jhon Lobb who inherited together with the equipment, materials and footwear still in production also part of the vast clientele, represented by members of the aristocracy as well as the political and economic world. both British and international. His shoes, especially those dating back to the 30s-40s, sometimes still admirable on the feet of some gentleman who inherited them from his father or from other Tuczek client relatives, are considered real masterpieces, studied by other shoemakers and cult object by enthusiasts and collectors. Among the most representative characteristics of these shoes are an extremely slim and clean line with a toe that, due to the harmony of the proportions, is defined by many as "sculpted", the presence on the front (cap-toe) of finely chiseled medallions and the existence in the production of original models with elastic side gussets, associated or not with a false lacing. This last type of footwear, characterized by the ease of being easily put on and removed, is also present in the production of John Lobb who adopted it in honor of Tuczek. George Cleverley (1898- 1991), considered one of the best shoemakers of the second half of the twentieth century, began his career in 1920 at Tuczek where he remained for 38 years before setting up his own business, opening his shop in Cork Street in 1958. Mayfair neighborhood. Cleverley brought back in his production techniques and drawings learned at Tuczek, including the characteristic models with elastic inserts and the finely chiseled medallions to decorate the front of the shoes. The first photo shows a pair of crocodile leather tassel moccasins probably from the 1960s, which belonged to Alexis von Rosenberg-Redé, third Baron de Redé. Baron de Redé (1922-2004), son of Oskar Adolf Rosenberg-Redé famous Austro-Hungarian banker appointed in 1916 baron by Emperor Charles I of Austria, can be considered as one of the last great European aesthetes and one of the men most elegant of the twentieth century. He moved to the USA at the age of 18 due to the Nazi persecution and in 1946 he returned to Europe together with the painter Salvador Dali ', with whom he had a very long association, settling in Paris. Here he lived in the ground floor apartments of the seventeenth-century Hotel Lambert on the island of Saint-Louis, starting the restoration which was later completed by Baron Guy de Rothschild and his wife Marie-Hélène following their purchase of the entire building in 1975.
Refined homosexual, thanks to the fact that he became the lover of the very wealthy Chilean industrialist Arturo Lopez-Wilshaw from whom he had a considerable prerogative in life and half of the inheritance at his death, he represented one of the points of reference starting immediately after the war of the social, artistic and cultural life of Paris (note his friendship with Jean Cocteau), acquiring wide fame for his luxurious masquerade parties, including the legendary Bal Oriental held at the Hotel Lambert on December 5, 1969. The Hotel Lambert was decorated for the occasion on the theme of the Thousand and One Nights, and in his rooms there were scents of myrrh and jasmine. Two enormous papier-mache elephants adorned the courtyard, while two Hindu musicians and sixteen men, dressed as Nubian slaves holding torches, were placed on the entrance staircase; de Redé himself wore a Mughal prince costume made by Pierre Cardin. Thanks to the relationships established in these festivals, which saw the participation not only of exponents of the European aristocracy including the Dukes of Windsor but also of important representatives of the world of finance, culture, fashion (Pierre Cardin and Yves Saint Laurent were launched by de Redé), of cinema and of what we now define as the international jet set, de Redé was able to expand its already considerable assets with fruitful investments. The next two images (second and third photos) give us a testimony of Alexis de Redé's elegance: the first, dating back to 1968, shows him in Paris in a magnificent gray morning suit and top hat together with Maria Callas, Liz taylor and Richard Burton; in the second we see him in his apartments at the Lambert Hotel wearing a dark suit with a double-breasted "Duke of Kent" jacket. After the death of Tuczek, Baron de Redè became a client of George Cleverley, in whose collection there is a model of tassel loafers called De Redé (fourth photo), testifying to the Baron's predilection for this type of footwear.

View attachment 37494View attachment 37495

The following photos show some models produced by Tuczek, most of which are owned by an English collector who inherited them from his uncle. The models date back to a vast period between 1938 and 1969 as detectable, when still clearly evident, from the branded labels inside the shoes bearing the address of the headquarters which was from 1938 to 1966 at 17 Clifford Street ( fifth photo) and from 1966 to 1969 at 21 Jermyn Street (sixth photo). This last labeling belongs to a pair of wholecut oxfords in blue suede (seventh photo) which therefore can be dated between 1966 and 1969. In the photos from the eighth to the seventeenth are respectively portrayed:

single strap monks in chocolate brown suede,

side gusset slips on black lizard,

side gussets slips on brown crocodile,

side gusset full brogues with false black lizard laces,

half brogue oxfords in brown calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue oxfords in black calfskin,

full brogue derbys with two holes in brown calfskin,

half brogue spectators white and brown,

full brogue spectators white and brown.

View attachment 37496View attachment 37497View attachment 37498View attachment 37499View attachment 37500View attachment 37501View attachment 37502View attachment 37503View attachment 37504View attachment 37505
I have just trade marked the name. We are relaunching next year!
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
3,894
Journeyman Journeyman well well well....I am completely shocked at what l am reading here. You own Vass, BIG Johnny Lobb, Edward Green and Berluti??? Where did you get those from? I never knew you owned shoos like that. You really are a quiet achiever...climbing that shoo ladder quietly in secret. I never dreamed you were at that type of level. I thought you were at the C&J and Loaske level, and yet here you are swimming around at higher levels.

I got my first pair of Edward Greens about 20 years ago, with another couple of pairs picked up about 10-12 years ago. The JL Paris are about 15 years old, Ferragamo Tramezza, Santoni and Berluti about 10-11 years old, Vass about nine or ten years old.


Does anybody know the legend of Tuczek?

I remember there was a bit of chatter about Nicholas Tuczek on StyleForum a number of years back.

Occasionally, pairs of Tuczek shoes come up for sale on eBay or other sites and, according to what I read on StyleForum back at the time, bidding can be quite fierce. I'd be surprised if people are actually wearing pairs of century-old boots that were made for other people's feet, so I assume that they must just be collecting them to look at.
 
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Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
125
I thought he was a red sock wearing leftie.

He is. I can't stand the guy.
Occasionally, pairs of Tuczek shoes come up for sale on eBay or other sites and, according to what I read on StyleForum back at the time, bidding can be quite fierce. I'd be surprised if people are actually wearing pairs of century-old boots that were made for other people's feet, so I assume that they must just be collecting them to look at.

If I managed to get my hands on a pair that fit me, I would wear them.
 

Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
125
This guy on Instagram has an enviable shoe collection. Cleverley, Foster & Son, Lattanzi, etc.
This is far from the entirety of a collection which must have cost him several hundred thousand.

Screenshot_20210505-143935_Instagram.jpg
Screenshot_20210505-143917_Instagram.jpg
Screenshot_20210505-143910_Instagram.jpg
Screenshot_20210505-144354_Instagram.jpg
 

robertito

Well-Known Member
Messages
937
I've had a pair of Edward Greens for about 20 years, with another couple of pairs picked up about 10-12 years ago. The JL Paris are about 15 years old, Ferragamo Tramezza, Santoni and Berluti about 10-11 years old, Vass about nine or ten years old.




I remember there was a bit of chatter about Nicholas Tuczek on StyleForum a number of years back.

Occasionally, pairs of Tuczek shoes come up for sale on eBay or other sites and, according to what I read on StyleForum back at the time, bidding can be quite fierce. I'd be surprised if people are actually wearing pairs of century-old boots that were made for other people's feet, so I assume that they must just be collecting them to look at.
I have actually bid a couple of times on ebay for tuczek'. Just out of curiosity. I was going to wear them anyway but I have always found his last gorgeous. What I do is put a sniper bid for a low amount to see what happens. From memory they sell around USD 300/400. Some of them in dreadful shape. This guy buys them, restores and uses them.

 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,751
Which reminds me, Jon Snow of Channel 4 news has just retired.

About time too...he has very young wife doesn't he?
View attachment 37552

This guy is supposed to be a style icon? Sorry, that tie is just awful.
Before Jon Snow, Channel 4 & Co. became an opinionated spin on the news and fully paid for propaganda show, I considered getting some Victoria Richards ties. But why would you buy a tie that looks like a Rothko reproduction in miniature that you wear around your neck?
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
A restoration job, with some alterations, on a pair of shell Alden loafers:




Interesting to see how some scratches are sanded off with sandpaper (then the area is dyed again), an advantage of horse leather, and how the gemming is reinforced by adding a layer of canvas. It's a pretty major work as the shoes are totally stripped down and rebuilt with a new welt and restitched. Not a fan of the contrasting blue stitching, yet an impressive job.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
I have actually bid a couple of times on ebay for tuczek'. Just out of curiosity. I was going to wear them anyway but I have always found his last gorgeous. What I do is put a sniper bid for a low amount to see what happens. From memory they sell around USD 300/400. Some of them in dreadful shape. This guy buys them, restores and uses them.

Thank you! Great contribution. Those 1930s Henry Maxwell's are really impressive: elegant, perfectly balanced last, superb finishing. That leather must have been really superior quality, still beautiful after almost a century. Nothing extreme, the toe is round but sleek, the waist is slim but soft.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
355
Pretty incredible, this gentleman assesses he has shrunken the size of these shoes from a British 11 to a 9 1/2. Honestly I struggle to believe that something like this is possible: he says to have reduced length and width. Moreover he has dyed that pair, a Gaziano&Girling Hayes, originally in a caramel shade, as he says, probably Vintage Pine, into a chocolate tone.





This should be the original:

tumblr_mu05r9rVJi1qj30hzo4_1280.jpg
 

Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
125
Unsure if it's the same guy that has http://centipede.web.fc2.com/ Shooey do you remember the name?

That's an extremely impressive collection, but I don't think it's the same guy. After a brief look I see many shoes that the Instagram guy doesn't seem to have and the Instagram guy has many that aren't on that list.
For example, the IG guy has twenty year old Cleverley bespoke not on that list.
 

Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
125
Pretty incredible, this gentleman assesses he has shrunken the size of these shoes from a British 11 to a 9 1/2. Honestly I struggle to believe that something like this is possible: he says to have reduced length and width. Moreover he has dyed that pair, a Gaziano&Girling Hayes, originally in a caramel shade, as he says, probably Vintage Pine,

Not that it really matters, but that looks more like the Hanley. The Hayes is different. It has a floating medallion.

Impressive work.
 
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