The end of British Hong Kong

Fwiffo

Comes off as a condescending prick
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http://m.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-29477731

Why isn't there a thread about this? Are you not concerned the communists will turn the Savile Row imitators into a mindless factory for poorly constructed garments affixed with a prominent Italian label?

Is there no lament that the British education system, common law, freedom of press and a free market will be swept away by the oppression of the politburo?
 
China doesn't do personal freedom. I'm not sure there was any debate they'd try and assimilate HK at some point.
 
It's sad that some pointless protest will mark the end of a very unique cosmopolitan city that acted as a crossroads for Western and Asian cultures.

At some point they will tear down the English signs and order the judges to cease donning wigs.

And yes I was a bit tipsy when I posted that.
 
It's sad that some pointless protest will mark the end of a very unique cosmopolitan city that acted as a crossroads for Western and Asian cultures.

At some point they will tear down the English signs and order the judges to cease donning wigs.

And yes I was a bit tipsy when I posted that.

I'd probably support the dropping of the wigs. That looks pretty weird.
 
I am gutted over this whole deal. Not going to lie. The Hong Kong cultural blend was one of the most unique things on the planet and the neatest thing I have experienced.
 
I'd probably support the dropping of the wigs. That looks pretty weird.

Nothing speaks more about the British influence than wearing wigs in a temperate climate. Oh, apparently Canada abandoned wigs and now just wear court dress.

I visited Hong Kong when it was a colony in 1987 and 1996. I don't remember much from the 1980s visit but I do remember quite a bit from 1996. I stopped by for a week in 2009. Although I had a horrible accident, it was still a neat place to go.
 
I don't want to seem insensitive, I'm just surprised there is any surprise. A country like China will always work to erode the freedoms. I wonder what options HK has in this scenario.
 
There was an agreement when Britain handed Hong Kong back to China that there would be one country, two systems - maintained for a period of fifty years. That was from 1997 so it's reaching the mid way point soon.

Hong Kong has no options and not even the protestors want to leave China -- they just want more rights, or in the broader context they don't want to lose anything they had before. However, they never had the right to vote under the British. Governors were appointed from London. Their bargaining power is greatly diminished now. I just read that in 1997 they were 16% of the country's GDP. Now it's 3%.

What they have and will lose: Hong Kong still competes in the Olympics under its own flag - they always have an ex pat there. It has its own currency. Most Chinese firms that want international credibility incorporate under Hong Kong law, which is based on British law. Up until a few years ago, the education system was still based on the A and O levels. There's still an English daily paper. They had a massive entertainment industry - being in some unique free world position in the Asian world that influenced Korean dramas, Jpop, Viet, Thai, etc. That's why Hollywood knows about Chow Yun Fat, etc. Hong Kong still drives on the British side of the road, but China drives on the opposite. They also speak a different dialect and write a different style of Chinese.

Slowly all these things are going to disappear. The health care system is flooded by people coming across the border - to take advantage of Western training or to have babies in Hong Kong so the kids have rights there. The education system, reformed but still decent, by parents from mainland China who send their children across borders every day for school. There is rampant corruption and counterfeiting in China so people from China go and buy everything; Louis Vuitton, milk powder, mobile phones, Viagra -- to the point shelves are bare. Since they travel across the border so often, they need places to stay so they drive up real estate and rental prices so ordinary people who live there can't afford it. Freedom of press is a dodgy term now - I read only one media outlet remains independent and its owner will likely face some kind of reprimand.

It is, or rather was, a very unique place. Seven million people living in the size of a New York borough.

I remember bumping into a blonde hair, blue eyed chap in Chinatown in Toronto and hearing him speak perfect Cantonese. I had to ask him how and it was because of his time spent in Hong Kong. The major television station (oops past tense) had an Indian actor who would look more out of place in Bollywood than on Hong Kong television screens - he too is fluent.

I don't think those things will happen anymore.
 
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http://m.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-29477731

Why isn't there a thread about this? Are you not concerned the communists will turn the Savile Row imitators into a mindless factory for poorly constructed garments affixed with a prominent Italian label?

Is there no lament that the British education system, common law, freedom of press and a free market will be swept away by the oppression of the politburo?


I suspect outfits like W.W. Chan will be tolerated as good sources of Western currencies. China certainly makes enough cheap clothing right now. I hope this will be the case, anyway.

I don't worry too much about this, though, because I find it fruitless to worry about things I have absolutely no control over.

On reflection, there is a quite a bit of custom tailoring in Shanghai, including a branch of W.W. Chan, right now.
 

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