The Good & Horrible Architecture Thread

güero

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I am open to being convinced that pleasant, liveable architecture did not end with or around Frank Llyod Wright.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Good luck
He certainly knew about how to create space - essential to live and nothing brutal about his designs. Although, the only building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright I've been in, is the Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum. Impressive.

Post-WWII the Brits created spacious council housing although the estates themselves were ugly terraced houses. Extremely well built in most cases. Then you had the 60s/70s high rise brutal monstrosities and then in the late 70s and 80s the semi-detached Barratt houses and estates with those awful small front gardens, box rooms and thin walls. The lot of the common Brit is not a pleasant lot.

I like views of the sea, or hills and woods if you can get it. I like greenery, but if you can't get that in a garden, it will more than do. It gives space between you and the world. A peaceful cushion if you like.

The missus likes the sea and sand and we've contemplated moving to the beach or the new harbor developments. Last time we looked we missed buying before it was built and was left with one or two apartments in 2019 at €650.00, way too small for us. The equivalent in size in the new builds to be ready in 2024/25 are now €881.00. Good investments.

But the thing with buildings and houses to live in the modern world in those developments: you get one parking space in the garage, there's no local free parking for several miles, in certain areas you might get one per household parking pass from the council (but not in the harbor) - so if you have older teenagers or even kids in your early 20s living with you, they'll likely need a car. Your partner might do too. Or people coming to visit you in general paying €10 an hour for car parking. Then you have have the summer traffic at weekends which on hot days will give you a problem if you do your supermarket shopping and then find yourself in a traffic jam.

This is the problem that high density, city living has. It cannot compete with more suburban environments for ease of space, car parking and visitors. Especially if you have kids.
 

güero

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VERY good:


Are you sure? What do you like about it?

Imho what can be seen regarding architecture is some (not all) incredibly dark rooms with tons of can lights and that’s it…
 

Grand Potentate

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Are you sure? What do you like about it?

Imho what can be seen regarding architecture is some (not all) incredibly dark rooms with tons of can lights and that’s it…
It’s well decorated at least
 

Pimpernel Smith

Tone Deaf Daddy
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10,809
Are you sure? What do you like about it?

Imho what can be seen regarding architecture is some (not all) incredibly dark rooms with tons of can lights and that’s it…
It's that mid-20th century modern desert dwelling design. In the style of Frank Sinatra's and Bing Crosby's place. I would like that open air living room experience.
 
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güero

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Imho it is a simulacrum:

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vs
1644576763234.jpeg

or

1644576841820.jpeg
 

kneeshuh

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If you want to have a look at some truly awful architecture by tasteless people for tasteless people, look no further:

https://mcmansionhell.com

Admittedly, the commentary can be a bit...forced, but it is truly a compilation that proves that no amount of money can buy taste.
 

güero

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Here’s some very nice and some debatable stuff. In general I like Alvar Aalto a lot.
 
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