The Wonderful World of Oz

Fwiffo

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Doesn't he have staffers who scout ahead before letting him walk around being heckled? I presume in some areas of the western 21st century political divide it could get confrontational and potentially violent.
 

fxh

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The Shooman The Shooman
For those who prefer to avoid interactions with the spider, Hochuli said: “At a local level, gardeners should wear gloves and be vigilant and people can also be careful checking shoes left outside before putting them on in the morning.”
 

The Shooman

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fxh fxh Journeyman Journeyman The Shooman The Shooman
The drying up of the bush (drought) is not linked to climate change as many know. Drought is a cycle and not a constant thing, and it is linked to other cycles such as the change in ocean patterns called the Indian Ocean Dipole. When that dipole pushes warmer water in the Indian Ocean east to Australia, we get rain: when it replaces that with cooler water we get drought. If drought was caused by climate change we should be getting worse and worse droughts all the time, but droughts come and go. We also know droughts aren't linked to climate change because of Andy Pitman's research. In fact, these days crop yields around the world are better than ever as l have proven.

However there is one point I give to the climate alarmists. Extra CO2 is good for plant growth, so this certainly would help encourage the bushfires.

Remember also, there have been worse bushfires in Australia in the old days that burned more land area in one state than all of Australia combined in the 2020 season. Bushfires have always happened in Australia.

and even if you take this average temperature chart for Australia into account, it shows there is only an extra 1.5 degree average of hotter weather in recent times, so does this cause all of Australia to suddenly burn? So what caused those bigger bushfires to burn in the old days when the temperature was cooler?

We need to be careful not to blame climate change for everything.

In the climate change threads l am going to start giving the climate groups a good kick in the pants. I've got some nuggets saved up.
 
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The Shooman

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Job instability, downward pressure on wages and high housing prices, not a good mix. The system is broken, we need to return to tradition and do it the way we used to do it. Globalisation is a killer and unsustainable! These current times will provide great wisdom for the new beginnings that will soon come.
 

Journeyman

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It's an unfortunate situation and tends to be fuelled by two factors - very low interest rates (thus easy availability of money and ability to make repayments even on ridiculously large loans); and increasing population (thus increased demand for housing.

Capital cities in Australia had a period of stagnation in the 1990s and when looking at house values it's quite amazing to see that some properties in very desirable areas sold for the same, or even lower, prices in 1998/99 than they did at the beginning of the decade. However, demand took off in 2000 or 2001 and apart from a couple of slowdowns, really hasn't looked back since. In some suburbs, property has easily tripled or even quadrupled in price compared to prices back in 2000/2001.

Of course, some of the increase in price is also due to property development. House blocks used to be larger, so it's possible to fit a "boutique" (Australian for luxury, or specially-designed) block of apartments on older housing blocks. So a developer comes in, outbids everyone for the house, bulldozes it, builds a 3-4 storey block of apartments that are probably rubbish but have stone benchtops and new technology, and sells the apartments for $1-2 million each. Pay a couple of million for the old house, spend a couple of million building the apartments, and sell the lot for $10 million. Not a bad profit for a year's work.

As a result, people who don't have as much money, or who are younger and starting out in life, have to move out to the city fringes as that is where the housing is more affordable. Unfortunately, there's little public transport out there and the work is located back in the more established suburbs or in the city centre, so they have to drive long distances and then spend a long time on public transport. It's common for people in those areas to spend 2-3 hours commuting per day.
 

fxh

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Astrophysicist gets magnets stuck up nose while inventing coronavirus device
Australian Dr Daniel Reardon ended up in hospital after inserting magnets in his nostrils while building a necklace that warns you when you touch your face
Naaman Zhou @naamanzhou Mon 30 Mar 2020 15.48 AEDTLast modified on Mon 30 Mar 2020 21.12 AEDT


Astrophysicist Daniel Reardon was playing around with powerful neodymium magnets while trying to make a coronavirus safety device and managed to get them stuck in his nose.
Astrophysicist Daniel Reardon was playing around with powerful neodymium magnets while trying to make a coronavirus safety device and managed to get them stuck in his nose. Photograph: Supplied by Daniel Reardon

An Australian astrophysicist has been admitted to hospital after getting four magnets stuck up his nose in an attempt to invent a device that stops people touching their faces during the coronavirus outbreak.

Dr Daniel Reardon, a research fellow at a Melbourne university, was building a necklace that sounds an alarm on facial contact, when the mishap occurred on Thursday night.

The 27 year-old astrophysicist, who studies pulsars and gravitational waves, said he was trying to liven up the boredom of self-isolation with the four powerful neodymium magnets.


“I have some electronic equipment but really no experience or expertise in building circuits or things,” he told Guardian Australia.
“I had a part that detects magnetic fields. I thought that if I built a circuit that could detect the magnetic field, and we wore magnets on our wrists, then it could set off an alarm if you brought it too close to your face. A bit of boredom in isolation made me think of that.”


However, the academic realised the electronic part he had did the opposite – and would only complete a circuit when there was no magnetic field present.
“I accidentally invented a necklace that buzzes continuously unless you move your hand close to your face,” he said.

“After scrapping that idea, I was still a bit bored, playing with the magnets. It’s the same logic as clipping pegs to your ears – I clipped them to my earlobes and then clipped them to my nostril and things went downhill pretty quickly when I clipped the magnets to my other nostril.”
Reardon said he placed two magnets inside his nostrils, and two on the outside. When he removed the magnets from the outside of his nose, the two inside stuck together. Unfortunately, the researcher then attempted to use his remaining magnets to remove them.

“At this point, my partner who works at a hospital was laughing at me,” he said. “I was trying to pull them out but there is a ridge at the bottom of my nose you can’t get past.

“After struggling for 20 minutes, I decided to Google the problem and found an article about an 11-year-old boy who had the same problem. The solution in that was more magnets. To put on the outside to offset the pull from the ones inside.

“As I was pulling downwards to try and remove the magnets, they clipped on to each other and I lost my grip. And those two magnets ended up in my left nostril while the other one was in my right. At this point I ran out of magnets.”

Before attending the hospital, Reardon attempted to use pliers to pull them out, but they became magnetised by the magnets inside his nose.


“Every time I brought the pliers close to my nose, my entire nose would shift towards the pliers and then the pliers would stick to the magnet,” he said. “It was a little bit painful at this point.

“My partner took me to the hospital that she works in because she wanted all her colleagues to laugh at me. The doctors thought it was quite funny, making comments like ‘This is an injury due to self-isolation and boredom.’”

At the hospital, a team of two doctors applied an anaesthetic spray and manually removed the magnets from Reardon’s nose.
Hospital record: Daniel Reardon’s discharge report after presenting at hospital with magnets stuck up his nose.


“When they got the three out from the left nostril, the last one fell down my throat,” he said. “That could have been a bit of a problem if I swallowed or breathed it in, but I was thankfully able to lean forward and cough it out … Needless to say I am not going to play with the magnets any more.”

Medical records from the emergency department said that Reardon did not have difficulty breathing, and denied the presence of further magnets up his nose.

The astrophysicist told Guardian Australia he had ruled out further experiments with the magnets and face-touching, and would find other ways to pass the time while at home.

“I’m actually getting a lot of work done,” he said. “Working remotely is not that bad. We are also renovating our house, so I am building shelves, making furniture and doing some tiling.”
 

Fwiffo

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I'm told the best pizza and Italian food in Australia is at Julius - Brisbane. Even the Kiwi agreed.
 

Journeyman

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I'm told the best pizza and Italian food in Australia is at Julius - Brisbane.
It's trendy. I've been there after work once. Food was OK, but you can do better.
Now that I'm in my forties, I just want good food instead of overpriced, trendy stuff in a dark, converted warehouse that's so noisy you can't hear what anyone is actually saying.

There was a fantastic Italian place down the Valley (another inner-city suburb) when I was at university that was run by an Italian family. The cannoli was to die for. Had a table soccer (foosball, it might be called in North America?) game out the back where the kids of Italian families used to hang out and play. Unfortunately, the parents must have retired and the kids sold it off and the place was knocked down and developed into apartments.

There are a couple of nice, small Italian places not too far from me. One does damn good pizza from a traditional Italian pizza oven, and the other does oven-baked gnocchi (plus other dishes, but I've never bothered to try them because the gnocchi is so good).
 
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