Your take on dieworkwear, shill or enthusiast?

verrihappy

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I understand he's a graduate student, and wonder where and how he gets the time and money to arrange for trunk shows for mostly dubious tailors, and arranging free of charge, refunds and returns.
 
He seems like a nice guy, which ends up being misguided. Another social justice warrior unable to hide his self interest.

By the way V verrihappy , get an avatar so you'll be take seriously, this crowd is fickle.
 
I thought he was on his late 40's.

Is that because DieWorkwear has a picture of Elliot Richardson (former US Attorney General in the 1970s) as his SF avatar picture?

Elliot Richardson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Low_Richardson5990-02.jpg
 
1898 is the year that Spain lost its last 2 colonies; Cuba and Filipinas. that year is called in Spanish:.' The disaster of 98' good year for Sarto to be born.
Regarding DWW i think he is an enthusiastic
 
As a casual observer, he's in the overlap of the Venn diagram. Whether he's an enthusiastic shill or a shilling enthusiast, I'd like to say the latter.
 
I think he is a guy who just likes to be involved with things. There are people like that out there. He is one of them. To some extent, I recognize that in myself. It's fun to be involved.
 
I think he is a guy who just likes to be involved with things. There are people like that out there. He is one of them. To some extent, I recognize that in myself. It's fun to be involved.
I prefer to be uninvolved as possible.
 
Well this thread is moving along swimmingly

To get it on track, does anyone know what he actually does for a living or is his blog his job? An ever-increasing rate of higher end bespoke (clothing) and MTO (footwear) makes me wonder where the $$$ comes from
 
Die Workwear is German for The Workwear.

That's a good point. Maybe's DWW is a secret "streetwear & denim" mole, working to undermine SF's classical menswear section from within, while people think that his name means precisely the opposite...




That's a joke, by the way.
 
Actually, in "Die, Workwear" the "die" is not the German article or pronoun. It's more like" Stirb, Arbeitskleidung!"
 
Well this thread is moving along swimmingly

To get it on track, does anyone know what he actually does for a living or is his blog his job? An ever-increasing rate of higher end bespoke (clothing) and MTO (footwear) makes me wonder where the $$$ comes from

He's an academic. Probably family money. Not that it matters though. Who cares where he gets it from? As long as he's not an igent getting in debt or depraving his family from holidays and whatnot to finance clothes (like IS), he's free to spend the money as he likes.
 
He's an academic. Probably family money. Not that it matters though. Who cares where he gets it from? As long as he's not an igent getting in debt or depraving his family from holidays and whatnot to finance clothes (like IS), he's free to spend the money as he likes.

Is he an academic? Unbel is, so this is another one? Frankly given US academic salaries for the arts, one cannot afford bespoke from the makers he uses.

Does it matter. If he were not a #menswear blogger then it is less important. But given the shilling and freebies that are involved in the industry it is germaine to ask.
 
Is he an academic? Unbel is, so this is another one? Frankly given US academic salaries for the arts, one cannot afford bespoke from the makers he uses.

Does it matter. If he were not a #menswear blogger then it is less important. But given the shilling and freebies that are involved in the industry it is germaine to ask.

I don't think he gets anything for free, but I suppose we should invite him to this thread so he can say for himself. That's why I said it must be family money, because as you said, hardly any academic makes enough to live in SF and buy lots of bespoke and streetwear stuff.
 
I love culture. I could study culture as a psychology PhD. I could study culture as an anthropology PhD. Or through sociology. Or through political science. Or through history. I chose to do it through management for two reasons. One, it was an easier jump from the field of economics, I already have real world experience with management from a cross-cultural perspective, and I'm way more comfortable with quantitative research than qualitative research. Two, management professors start at the low six figures, they can generally supplement their income through consulting work, and there are much, much better stipends as a graduate student (as well as consulting opportunities here, if you have the right connections).

I have no idea how there are so many professors in non-lucrative (by the standards of academia) fields able to spend decent money on clothing. Though come to think of it, I don't think there are any professors on SF that really spend a lot of money on clothing. Most seem to spend very reasonably and with decent thrift by SF standards.

But I definitely understand the appeal of a place like SF to academics. I know it drives Stitches and a number of other people nuts when folks really delve into abstraction/theory/obscure trivialities. But damned if it isn't fun.
 
I love culture. I could study culture as a psychology PhD. I could study culture as an anthropology PhD. Or through sociology. Or through political science. Or through history. I chose to do it through management for two reasons. One, it was an easier jump from the field of economics, I already have real world experience with management from a cross-cultural perspective, and I'm way more comfortable with quantitative research than qualitative research. Two, management professors start at the low six figures, they can generally supplement their income through consulting work, and there are much, much better stipends as a graduate student (as well as consulting opportunities here, if you have the right connections).

I have no idea how there are so many professors in non-lucrative (by the standards of academia) fields able to spend decent money on clothing. Though come to think of it, I don't think there are any professors on SF that really spend a lot of money on clothing. Most seem to spend very reasonably and with decent thrift by SF standards.

DWW spends crazy amounts though. Steed at $4k a pop, not to mention all the other tailors he uses, and lots of streetwear jackets that cost about the same. I believe I saw him writing about sweaters that cost around $350, and he bought 5 of them just like that.
 
I have no idea how there are so many professors in non-lucrative (by the standards of academia) fields able to spend decent money on clothing. Though come to think of it, I don't think there are any professors on SF that really spend a lot of money on clothing. Most seem to spend very reasonably and with decent thrift by SF standards.

But I definitely understand the appeal of a place like SF to academics. I know it drives Stitches and a number of other people nuts when folks really delve into abstraction/theory/obscure trivialities. But damned if it isn't fun.

99/100 real world academics could not give a flying fuck about how they look and most have their clothes bought for them by their wives. So basically they're the same as the residual male population.

As for SF, if you want to start a discussion on post-structuralism or some other nonsense, there will be no shortage of takers ready and able to show off their Googling/Wikipedia-reading-and-retyping abilities in a bid to improve their self-worth by pretending they know something.

But suggest a practical course of action to recover their mum's money spent on non-existent leather jackets and the true, undeniable stupidity of most of the members there comes to the fore.
 
99/100? I think you might be being generous there. I'd put it at maybe 999/1000.

Actually, thinking about it, 99 out of 100 might be right.
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The Manton/Foo type academics of SF are gone. People, I think, just talk about clothes as clothes. They just do it very, very nerdily. The analysis remains without any of the presumption of it being meaningful in any way.
 
1898 is the year that Spain lost its last 2 colonies; Cuba and Filipinas. that year is called in Spanish:.' The disaster of 98' good year for Sarto to be born.
Regarding DWW i think he is an enthusiastic
Sarto was born 20 April 1889.
 
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As for SF, if you want to start a discussion on post-structuralism or some other nonsense, there will be no shortage of takers ready and able to show off their Googling/Wikipedia-reading-and-retyping abilities in a bid to improve their self-worth by pretending they know something.
It wont be long now before you are going to daily mass with sarto, lamenting the demise of real men like el Caudillo de la Última Cruzada y de la Hispanidad and Il Duce, and then inevitably, you'll be receiving offer of sexual deviant rectumites from clothing forums by private message.
 
Die, Workwear! - Some Equal, But None Better

"I’ve been a client of Steed’s for two years now, having ordered about a half dozen jackets and a couple of pairs of pants."

So, 6 jackets * $3000= $18,000 or $9,000 per year on Steed. Combine all the workwear stuff and I guess he easily spends $20,000/year on clothes. I don't know exactly how much academics make, but it's not more than $200k unless you're tenured and publish loads. I do know SF is pretty expensive, with a median rent of around $4500/month.

So, I wouldn't be surprised if he spends a quarter of his post tax income on clothes, which would be a hell of a lot, which means he might just shill and receive free shit.
 
I shall remain as un-involved in this thread as possible since he did send me a little nasty PM before.
 

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