Music Of The Moment

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,595
One of his best LPs.
And inspired by a collection of Stax soul records he had bought.
All of Costello's albums up to Imperial Bedroom and later albums like King of America and Blood and Chocolate are essential IMHO.
All of those albums, up to Blood and Chocolate where brilliant with hardly any duff tracks from start to finish. Afterwards he was no longer a savant, he became too erudite and everything was studied and he lost his instinct. Still good for one or two tracks, interesting collaboration with Macca, but the consistency was gone. 45 I think stands up to that period, She, one or two others you can dig deep to find. Maybe The Juliet Letters, but the rest just don't stand up as classic albums.
 

formby002

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,099
And inspired by a collection of Stax soul records he had bought.

All of those albums, up to Blood and Chocolate where brilliant with hardly any duff tracks from start to finish. Afterwards he was no longer a savant, he became too erudite and everything was studied and he lost his instinct. Still good for one or two tracks, interesting collaboration with Macca, but the consistency was gone. 45 I think stands up to that period, She, one or two others you can dig deep to find. Maybe The Juliet Letters, but the rest just don't stand up as classic albums.
Costello is a bit of a touchstone for me, like The Beatles, in that if someone says they're crap then I quickly come to the opinion that they don't know anything about pop music.

However, I'm aware that this 'logic' can be turned against me because I think that Dylan and The Beach Boys are crap.

So there you have it!!! LOL.

...oh! and don't get me on about recorded Jazz......which is fucking dreadful!!! Has there ever been a song title more apt for an opening track of an album than that of Miles Davis' Kind of Blue?

Let the pile-on commence!!!
 

Kingstonian

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,330
Costello is a bit of a touchstone for me, like The Beatles, in that if someone says they're crap then I quickly come to the opinion that they don't know anything about pop music.

However, I'm aware that this 'logic' can be turned against me because I think that Dylan and The Beach Boys are crap.

So there you have it!!! LOL.

...oh! and don't get me on about recorded Jazz......which is fucking dreadful!!! Has there ever been a song title more apt for an opening track of an album than that of Miles Davis' Kind of Blue?

Let the pile-on commence!!!
Dylan LPs were great up to and including ‘Desire’. ‘Basement Tapes’ and live LPs included.

Beach Boys ‘Greatest Hits’ are fine - all the surfing stuff. Not convinced by ‘Pet Sounds’ high rating though.
 

Kingstonian

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,330
Recorded jazz King Oliver and Bessie Smith are fine.

Also Billie Holiday recordings of the thirties and forties before her voice got raspy. Count Basie is fine too. Not keen on modern jazz though.
 

formby002

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,099
Recorded jazz King Oliver and Bessie Smith are fine.

Also Billie Holiday recordings of the thirties and forties before her voice got raspy. Count Basie is fine too. Not keen on modern jazz though.
I don't consider Holiday, Smith, Vaughn, et al Jazz, even though I know technically it is. What I dislike is the instrumental stuff especially post-WWII recorded stuff. Dreadful.

Live Jazz is a bit more tolerable.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,595
Costello is a bit of a touchstone for me, like The Beatles, in that if someone says they're crap then I quickly come to the opinion that they don't know anything about pop music.

However, I'm aware that this 'logic' can be turned against me because I think that Dylan and The Beach Boys are crap.

So there you have it!!! LOL.

...oh! and don't get me on about recorded Jazz......which is fucking dreadful!!! Has there ever been a song title more apt for an opening track of an album than that of Miles Davis' Kind of Blue?

Let the pile-on commence!!!
Kind of Blue, is the most urbane album of recorded music of all time.

The first track is of course, So What. There's no Kind of Blue on the album. Side 2 opens with All Blues which is magnificent.

Recorded jazz King Oliver and Bessie Smith are fine.

Also Billie Holiday recordings of the thirties and forties before her voice got raspy. Count Basie is fine too. Not keen on modern jazz though.
You missed out:



I don't consider Holiday, Smith, Vaughn, et al Jazz, even though I know technically it is. What I dislike is the instrumental stuff especially post-WWII recorded stuff. Dreadful.

Live Jazz is a bit more tolerable.

There's fantastic stuff you're missing out on there, but I do believe your basing your musical prejudices on badly recorded bebop, such as:



As opposed to this:


 

formby002

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,099
Kind of Blue, is the most urbane album of recorded music of all time.

The first track is of course, So What. There's no Kind of Blue on the album. Side 2 opens with All Blues which is magnificent.


You missed out:





There's fantastic stuff you're missing out on there, but I do believe your basing your musical prejudices on badly recorded bebop, such as:



As opposed to this:


I know the opening track of Kind of Blue is called So What. That was my point, it perfectly sums up the genre.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,595
I know the opening track of Kind of Blue is called So What. That was my point, it perfectly sums up the genre
That genre was the zeitgeist of the times before Muddy Waters, Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly and The Beatles took us to the Promised Land.


The new book is about Macca's lyric writing. So I would expect stuff on the craft of his writing and zero stuff about taking LSD in 1966 unless it was directly related to the writing and composing of that specific song.

The Morrissey autobiography is very good and recommended.

Morrissey's music remains, likeable from tough working class pubs in the north of England to surfing bars in Ipanema, a musical icon who resonates from Manchester to Sao Paolo, Mexico City and beyond.
 
Last edited:

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
4,975
I just ordered Brett Anderson’s second autobiographical volume. The first was a sheer delight. He writes well and comes across as far more introspective and grounded than I would have ever expected. This new volume is the Suede years of fame, fortune, drugs etc.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
4,975
The Letter used to be constantly on the radio. Not sure what happened to them later. Last item seems to be a follow up band.

Big Star was a lot more than a “follow up band”, though Chilton’s subsequent solo work was spotty.
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
7,132
Costello is a bit of a touchstone for me, like The Beatles, in that if someone says they're crap then I quickly come to the opinion that they don't know anything about pop music.

However, I'm aware that this 'logic' can be turned against me because I think that Dylan and The Beach Boys are crap.

So there you have it!!! LOL.

...oh! and don't get me on about recorded Jazz......which is fucking dreadful!!! Has there ever been a song title more apt for an opening track of an album than that of Miles Davis' Kind of Blue?

Let the pile-on commence!!!
Oh you are a worry.
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
7,132
That genre was the zeitgeist of the times before Muddy Waters, Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly and The Beatles took us to the Promised Land.



The new book is about Macca's lyric writing. So I would expect stuff on the craft of his writing and zero stuff about taking LSD in 1966 unless it was directly related to the writing and composing of that specific song.

The Morrissey autobiography is very good and recommended.

Morrissey's music remains, likeable from tough working class pubs in the north of England to surfing bars in Ipanema, a musical icon who resonates from Manchester to Sao Paolo, Mexico City and beyond.
Not much impact here in Oz for the Moz
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
7,132
Not much impact here in Oz for the Moz
I get a laugh out of the interviews where Mark E Smith , who knew him back when, always would say “Hello Stephen” whenever he met him knowing the Moz hated to be called Stephen.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
4,975
Not much impact here in Oz for the Moz
The Smiths had a huge following in the Oz 1980s alternative scene. Every sad goth had a Meat Is Murder tshirt. I don’t think Morrissey inspired too many local musicians but Marr’s jangley guitar riffs definitely inspired a slew of indiepop badms fromThe Triffids to The Church. After about 1992 no one cared about Morrissey or his old band.

I get a laugh out of the interviews where Mark E Smith , who knew him back when, always would say “Hello Stephen” whenever he met him knowing the Moz hated to be called Stephen.

Ha! My favorite quote from that Ian Curtis biopic that came out about 12 years ago was when he turned to Hook in a moment of self-reflection and said: ‘well at least we’re not the fookin’ Fall!’
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,595
I get a laugh out of the interviews where Mark E Smith , who knew him back when, always would say “Hello Stephen” whenever he met him knowing the Moz hated to be called Stephen.
Tony Wilson use to always call him Stephen too.
The Smiths had a huge following in the Oz 1980s alternative scene. Every sad goth had a Meat Is Murder tshirt. I don’t think Morrissey inspired too many local musicians but Marr’s jangley guitar riffs definitely inspired a slew of indiepop badms fromThe Triffids to The Church. After about 1992 no one cared about Morrissey or his old band.



Ha! My favorite quote from that Ian Curtis biopic that came out about 12 years ago was when he turned to Hook in a moment of self-reflection and said: ‘well at least we’re not the fookin’ Fall!’
The thing with Morrissey, he has got less melodic over the years. Not everyone's cup of tea that. Lyrically as great as ever. Always good for a few interesting tracks per album. By contrast, Marr's stuff has been very pedestrian and lack lustre. His last album started to go somewhere a couple of tracks in.

 
Top Bottom