Menswear Experts - Do as I Say Not as I Do?

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
3,583

Andy should have saved his money and paid the big bucks for a top tailor. They can transform bodies like that. None of those tailors above were able to transform him, so none of those suits are worth the price. Get a few suits, but get the best tailor to make them, especially when you are a big bloke.
 

Halberstram

Well-Known Member
Messages
262
Andy should have saved his money and paid the big bucks for a top tailor. They can transform bodies like that. None of those tailors above were able to transform him, so none of those suits are worth the price. Get a few suits, but get the best tailor to make them, especially when you are a big bloke.
These suits look like nothing I would ever want to visit a tailor for.
 

Sammy Ambrose

Well-Known Member
Messages
817
Andy should have saved his money and paid the big bucks for a top tailor. They can transform bodies like that. None of those tailors above were able to transform him, so none of those suits are worth the price. Get a few suits, but get the best tailor to make them, especially when you are a big bloke.
Some of the suits are not too bad. At least he isn't mutton dressed as lamb. As a human being I found him okay. I took the mickey out of Pags once and he sorted it out. The same when Manton had to learn s lesson.
 
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Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,776
Some of the suits are not too bad. At least he isn't mutton dressed as lamb. As a human being I found him okay. I took the mickey out of Pags once and he sorted it out. The same when Manton had to learn s lesson.
He had a very good looking wife as I remember. Is she still around?
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
Here something for the numerous fans of Mr Crompton: different looks, some with elements in common, from the most casual to the dressiest, as intended to be worn in different situations.

how-to-dress-casually-smart-casual-513x770.jpg
how-to-dress-creative-513x770.jpg
how-to-dress-advertising-513x770.jpg

how-to-dress-creative-agency-513x770.jpg
how-to-dress-at-a-hedge-funds-513x770.jpg
how-to-dress-for-a-meeting-513x770.jpg
how-to-dress-with-tie-and-handkerchief-580x374.jpg



Well, an unbiased observation would recognize a sober and pleasant style in each of these styles. I would never wear the first three, as I never wear
T-shirts, jeans and sneakers, but even those ones are good and he looks comfortable. As a small flaw, I'd say that the turn-up on the jeans is too small, better none or a higher one.
My personal favourites are the fourth and the fifth, as I find that the button-down shirt (that I don't like) looks better without a tie, even though the knit one here is surely suitable.
 
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Mattrick

Well-Known Member
Messages
163
I don't dislike Crompton like most here do, and those are solid styles. I agree about his turnups. They are timid and reserved just as he is.
 

formby002

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,018
Here you are, if you prefer: Mr Attanasio sockless in a solaro suit.

View attachment 37481View attachment 37482View attachment 37483View attachment 37484
Here the description:

Jacket details: Solaro fabric by Caccioppoli; wide peak lapels; unstructured shoulder, three ironed in two; three patch pockets; three buttons spaced on the sleeve
Pants details: side buttoning; without loops; two front pleats; flap of 5 cm
Bespoke suit by Fabio Sodano // Santillo shirt // Giorgio Ricciardi tie // N.H. Tailoring // The Bespoke Dudes by Kador 1962 glasses // Bow Tie loafers

To me, even though not a bad outfit, there are some details I would wish different: the peak lapel doesn't suit well with the relaxed look, especially accentuated by the patch pockets (even the brest one); the trousers are too slim and too low rise, especially in contrast with the volume given by the double pleats; those sleeve buttons look rather odd so much distanced. The shirt is too bland, but it's my taste, can't say it's bad.

The solaro is a great fabric, here the original:

View attachment 37485

Fabio Attanasio seems to be a fan, here another (better to me) example:

View attachment 37486
Solaro wears hot.
 

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
7,712
Turnup on jeans for me never more than 1". Old School Mod Look.

Except for one pair of still new ish dark blue denim where I've gone really all workwear flamboyant and the cuffs are turned over twice and nearly 2" high!!!!!!!!!!
 

formby002

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,018
Turnup on jeans for me never more than 1". Old School Mod Look.

Except for one pair of still new ish dark blue denim where I've gone really all workwear flamboyant and the cuffs are turned over twice and nearly 2" high!!!!!!!!!!
Outrageous self-indulgence...
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
Turnup on jeans for me never more than 1". Old School Mod Look.

Except for one pair of still new ish dark blue denim where I've gone really all workwear flamboyant and the cuffs are turned over twice and nearly 2" high!!!!!!!!!!
I surely prefer you version.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
7,133
Turnup on jeans for me never more than 1". Old School Mod Look.

Except for one pair of still new ish dark blue denim where I've gone really all workwear flamboyant and the cuffs are turned over twice and nearly 2" high!!!!!!!!!!
For low shoes and ankle boots, I’d agree- just barely enough turn-up to glimpse the selvedge line.

For taller boots I think you can get away with more - though I still prefer a smaller cuff. I have a pair that are currently at 2”, folded four times. Once I wash them I’ll be able to decide how much hemming they need.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
For low shoes and ankle boots, I’d agree- just barely enough turn-up to glimpse the selvedge line.

For taller boots I think you can get away with more - though I still prefer a smaller cuff. I have a pair that are currently at 2”, folded four times. Once I wash them I’ll be able to decide how much hemming they need.
I think that 2 inches or 5/6cm is the right measure.
 

Lumpen

Well-Known Member
Messages
941
Turnup on jeans for me never more than 1". Old School Mod Look.

Except for one pair of still new ish dark blue denim where I've gone really all workwear flamboyant and the cuffs are turned over twice and nearly 2" high!!!!!!!!!!


There are way of turning the cuffs and on each leg that means ghey sexual preferences, as you know.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,776
There are way of turning the cuffs and on each leg that means ghey sexual preferences, as you know.
That's a bit like sporting red pants and suede shoes in London. It either meant you were gay, or had been an officer in the Scots Guards, in most cases, both.
 

Journeyman

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Supporter
Messages
4,171
That's how men of his era dress when it comes to tailored clothing. Don't forget that the default US and Canadian dress shirt is the billowy kind.

The crazy thing is that on multiple occasions when I was younger, I was told that I should go up a size in my suits so that I "had room to move". The size I was wearing was absolutely fine, and fit my shoulders and chest perfectly and the next size up would have made me look like Andy Gilchrist above - but salespeople kept on telling me that I needed room to move.

I always wondered why - what was I going to do in my suit that meant that I needed room to move? This wasn't the early 20th century, where men would go down the mines in a tattered jacket and trousers. It wasn't as though I was going to swing a pickaxe while wearing a suit jacket - the most I was going to do was to attempt to make a dramatic gesture while standing in a courtroom.

Then, ironically, all of a sudden the shrunken look came into vogue and I was being told that I needed to go down a size and to hem my trousers two inches shorter!

Look at the end of the sleeve by the wrist on that last photo

The same suit salespeople who kept on telling me that I needed "room to move" also told me that my jacket sleeves should come down to my thumb joint. My thumb joint!!!

When I mentioned that I was sure that it should come to the wrist bone, I was told that I was wrong, and that the sleeves would be too short and would pull up too much as I was moving around (again, swinging my pickaxe when I'm down the mine!).
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
I know, Simon Crompton is unpopular and disagreeable to the most forumers, but I like (mostly) his style and find what he writes quite reasonable.

For example the following article:


"Should you dress for yourself or for others?

Unsurprisingly, the answer is both.

Anyone that dresses without any regard for people around them is probably being rude, and certainly inconsiderate.

Dressing purely to conform, other the other hand, is just sad. Whether the result is natty or sloppy, you shouldn’t spend all your time worrying what other people think.

As with many style spectrums we cover, the best option is somewhere in the middle, with nuance that depends on both culture and personality.

Clothing is social. Always has been. There’s nothing wrong with being unusual or rebellious in what you wear, but don’t pretend it doesn’t matter what impression it gives.

The only thing I struggle with sometimes, is whether it’s foolish to change clothes based on context.

For example, I could feel self-conscious wearing a pocket square in the suburb where I live, but wouldn’t when I got to the end of my commute, in Mayfair.

I go back and forth on this, but in the end I think the most important thing is to feel comfortable. So if I don’t, I take it out.

No one really just dresses for themselves, or just for others. It’s a false dichotomy.

Everything and everyone is somewhere in between. That’s where it gets interesting."
 

Rambo

Supporter of Possible Sexual Deviants
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33,865
I know, Simon Crompton is unpopular and disagreeable to the most forumers, but I like (mostly) his style and find what he writes quite reasonable.

For example the following article:


"Should you dress for yourself or for others?

Unsurprisingly, the answer is both.

Anyone that dresses without any regard for people around them is probably being rude, and certainly inconsiderate.

Dressing purely to conform, other the other hand, is just sad. Whether the result is natty or sloppy, you shouldn’t spend all your time worrying what other people think.

As with many style spectrums we cover, the best option is somewhere in the middle, with nuance that depends on both culture and personality.

Clothing is social. Always has been. There’s nothing wrong with being unusual or rebellious in what you wear, but don’t pretend it doesn’t matter what impression it gives.

The only thing I struggle with sometimes, is whether it’s foolish to change clothes based on context.

For example, I could feel self-conscious wearing a pocket square in the suburb where I live, but wouldn’t when I got to the end of my commute, in Mayfair.

I go back and forth on this, but in the end I think the most important thing is to feel comfortable. So if I don’t, I take it out.

No one really just dresses for themselves, or just for others. It’s a false dichotomy.

Everything and everyone is somewhere in between. That’s where it gets interesting."
Tim And Eric Reaction GIF
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
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4,171
No one really just dresses for themselves, or just for others. It’s a false dichotomy.

Everything and everyone is somewhere in between. That’s where it gets interesting.

That actually seems to be a good article and, as it says, balance is key.

Once you've read it, it sounds self-evident. However, there are plenty of people on the internet who don't agree, and who like to argue that they only dress for themselves and that they don't care what other people think.

Of course, they most likely make those arguments while they're posting fit pics for other people to look at!
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
That actually seems to be a good article and, as it says, balance is key.

Once you've read it, it sounds self-evident. However, there are plenty of people on the internet who don't agree, and who like to argue that they only dress for themselves and that they don't care what other people think.

Of course, they most likely make those arguments while they're posting fit pics for other people to look at!

I think that the way we dress is a manifestation of our personality and is what we want to be perceived by other people.

And everybody likes to be complimented of course.
 

doghouse

King Of The Elite Idiots
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11,712
That actually seems to be a good article and, as it says, balance is key.

That article is simplistic tripe, and absolutely a prime example of what a dumb cunt Crompton is. Many paragraphs of pseudo intellectual galaxy brain shit to say what every function human being already knows.

It appeals to people that think The Matrix is a "deep" movie.
 

Journeyman

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4,171
That article is simplistic tripe, and absolutely a prime example of what a dumb cunt Crompton is. Many paragraphs of pseudo intellectual galaxy brain shit to say what every function human being already knows.

The thing is, though, that there's a metric sh!t-ton of rubbish written by pseudo-intellectuals on the internet about precisely the opposite - people love to toss on about how they dress for themselves, or about how everyone should dress for themselves.

That's how we end up with people like Tibor walking around a town in California wearing a top hat and tails to get ice cream...

So although every functioning human being should know and understand what Crompton was saying, I think that there are quite a few out there that don't.
 

doghouse

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The thing is, though, that there's a metric sh!t-ton of rubbish written by pseudo-intellectuals on the internet about precisely the opposite - people love to toss on about how they dress for themselves, or about how everyone should dress for themselves.

What, all 20 of them?

On a planet of billions of people, I'd challenge you to name 2 dozen #menswear authorities writing this.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543

It sounds obvious, and it is, still I think that many people are not aware of it and think to dress just for themselves.

By the way I want to refer to a post by S Sammy Ambrose in the thread What Are You Wearing Today:
"Interesting . I also have to like what I see in the mirror. But I see clothing as wallpaper. I don't want to have the ugliness of others imposed upon me."

I certainly like to be noted for my good style not for offending the perception of other people.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
That's how we end up with people like Tibor walking around a town in California wearing a top hat and tails to get ice cream...

I was just thinking about this. Dressing is social and we, still in a personal way, choose among different options, that however are "accepted" and usual.
Dressing like Tibor, breaking the time rules, on the other side looks ridiculous and affected.
 

Sauce

Well-Known Member
Messages
507
I can't be the only guy who dresses for a night out, checks himself in the mirror and asks himself, if I was top totty would I do me looking like this? Before a light spray of sex smell and leaving the gaff. Can I?
 

doghouse

King Of The Elite Idiots
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I'm not able to answer your question, but I think they are a few, in menswear fora and in real life.

Well then we agree. There are a few. Given half the population is below average intelligence, I would say we are doing pretty well. If we are going to give someone credit for stating the obvious like Crompton we might as well pack it up now.
 

Ambrosius08

Well-Known Member
Messages
185
It’s about one’s lifestyle and context. In any office environment, individuality should naturally be tuned down and replaced by professionalism. That includes wearing appropriate clothing that won’t stick out like a zebra in a horse race. Well-dressed ≠ dressed more formally, no matter what certain SF members tout.

In one’s spare time, anything goes. It’s then only a matter of lifestyle and self-expression. One’s outfits can even be a form of performance art. But people who dress like total aliens should be very aware they are in fact doing a performance, and not just casually buying ice cream while wearing white tie. Not many people see clothing like an artist sees their canvas - for them it’s primarily a tool for fitting in. Same reason that most people are deathly afraid of public speaking; it takes balls to stand out.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,776
It’s about one’s lifestyle and context. In any office environment, individuality should naturally be tuned down and replaced by professionalism. That includes wearing appropriate clothing that won’t stick out like a zebra in a horse race. Well-dressed ≠ dressed more formally, no matter what certain SF members tout.

In one’s spare time, anything goes. It’s then only a matter of lifestyle and self-expression. One’s outfits can even be a form of performance art. But people who dress like total aliens should be very aware they are in fact doing a performance, and not just casually buying ice cream while wearing white tie. Not many people see clothing like an artist sees their canvas - for them it’s primarily a tool for fitting in. Same reason that most people are deathly afraid of public speaking; it takes balls to stand out.
Some of the creative industries it's expected to be flamboyant and to stand out. They want to see an eccentric individual delivering the company's spin.

Agreed, you should dress appropriately for the gravitas of the position, but that doesn't mean you need to be toned down to bored inertness. I'm looking at a group photo of one of the last industry forums I was at, all my competitors where there and everyone is dressed in boring suits with baby blue or white shirts with very dull ties that don't stand out at all. The ladies are all in Angela Merkel Chairman Mao suits. So instead, I've a dark blue small gingham T&A shirt, a Dunhill repp tie which is dark blue, thin yellow and light blue stripes and then a navy William Lockie v-neck jumper having left the jacket on a hanger. It's conservative, appropriate and dressing for the situation but enough to stand out from the herd. That's the way I like it.
 

Streetlight

Active Member
Messages
39
So instead, I've a dark blue small gingham T&A shirt, a Dunhill repp tie which is dark blue, thin yellow and light blue stripes and then a navy William Lockie v-neck jumper having left the jacket on a hanger. It's conservative, appropriate and dressing for the situation but enough to stand out from the herd
That's what you wear when letting your hair down at a 1980s Conservative Party conference.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,776
That's what you wear when letting your hair down at a 1980s Conservative Party conference.
Not quite, there would be a couple of wraps of cocaine and the jumper would have to be ditched and a jacket in place to store the wraps.

In the 90s the big Conservative MP look was a plain blue shirt with a yellow jacquard tie.
 
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