Money and Wardrobe

Pauly Chase

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Is this really a thing? If so, punk rock has really gone downhill since my time.

Speaking of which, I have been listening to some Black Flag lately.

Back to topic. Persona style, and I emphasise personal here, is a way for me to channel self-expression/emotions sometimes. For me, I know many gothninja gear doesn't fit me well an yet I still wear them because I felt gloomy at that moment. However there is a limit on much I am willing to devote my bank account to that particular cause, and same goes SW&D and classic menswear.

I did, however, develop an appreciation for shoes. If I hit the lottery, that's one area I would indulge myself in.
 

prince nez

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Unless you invest a great deal of thought on the front end, making rash decisions is part of the learning process; doesn't matter if it is clothes or cars. The magnitude of that error is what separates the level of foolishness.

I agree with most of what's been said in this thread so far but just wanted to point out that (thankfully) most of us mature over time. Our style changes in a direct correlation with changes in lifestyle, responsibilities and world view - the most dramatic of which tend to happen in a man's 20s as 30s as he gets a proper job, starts a family, buys a house etc. (at least one of which still applies to most people).

So what you wore (or drove) 20 years ago, though it might have looked good at the time and suited your life then, often no longer fits who you are today. Just because you don't wear those skinny jeans and cuban heeled boots anymore - or drive a cool old car that broke down every second week - doesn't mean buying them in the first place was a rash decision or they weren't the perfect choice at the time. I have some stuff (which for whatever reason I never get around to donating or selling) which I wore quite a bit when I was younger, but it just isn't "me" anymore. I actually think of it as someone else's wardrobe.

Conversely, I can't imagine wearing the 'old man' duds that I wear now when I was 20.

This is why I find iGents' attempts at 'permanent style' and MC uniforms so absurd. You can no more have a permanent style than you can a permanent lifestyle - which is only possible if you don't grow as a person (e.g. Foo - literally and metaphorically).
 

chogall

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Is this the self help groupie thread where we make a circle and confess to each other about our bad spending habits?

After accumulating quite a few pieces of clothings during 2008 downturn, I am now much more austere in terms of the number of purchases. But I must confess that I did splurge on bespeaking a pair of JLP shoes just last year.

I am a big admirer of a well thought out wardrobe with interchangeable pieces. I think in the most recent Men's Ex issue, they had an article of making a unique month long look book using less than 30 pieces of clothing, including accessories. There were three suits, three pants, three jackets, 3 pairs of shoes, etc. I would love to modify my wardrobe to that level.

The worst that could happen to anyone's style is to become a clothing trader like many on SF; constantly buying and selling his own 'inventory' to fund the next purchase.
 

Zé Ferreira

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I agree.

I love the idea of a "well paced" wardrobe as I move into my young-professional phase. I think a lot of professional industries would be conducive to the 30-outfits type things you mention chogall chogall . I see those in women's magazines all the time; should be even easier for men in suits.

I think it helps to cover basic colors in medium weight fabrics. I mean, it's been said but bears repeating - a medium gray and medium blue suit may not be the hippest thing, but they go an awfully long way.

The downside is, as I've been finding out basing things on blue and gray, is that when you do reach a point of wanting to incorporate a different color - browns, olives, and the like - all of a sudden you need to adjust multiple pieces at once.
 

Russell Street

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I'm reminded of this hired gun when I was an intern. He was a fairly flashy guy in dark suits and contrast collar shirts amongst typical Dilberts and Dwight Schrute office drones. Anyway, at lunch one day he told the younger crowd how he remembered when all he owned fit in his car, and he had one entry level suit. He listed the increments of suit price levels that he graduated thru, pointing out that each time you moved up, all your previous stuff suddenly paled in comparison. He advised to not climb this ladder, basically. Or maybe to not do so ahead of the financial ability to totally revamp at each step. I dunno.

There is much to be said for the long-term practical wardrobe, at least as for being a less stupid way to spend money. This is why we talk style and not fashion. Sadly, too many people think they are stylish when merely mimicing trendy fashions. Heck, I need some dark oxfords and despite wanting brogues, ideally long wings, I find myself thinking that I should opt for something plainer as I may cool on the punched shoe trend. Anyway, the classic blazer or drab suit is a wiser expenditure than some bright plaid coat or whatever. We all know this.

I'm also aware of one getting overzealous with a new interest and really overdoing it. I've learned caution and discretion. Obviously some people don't know that they their impulsive spending on fickle whims may prove regrettable.
 

Thruth

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I agree with most of what's been said in this thread so far but just wanted to point out that (thankfully) most of us mature over time. Our style changes in a direct correlation with changes in lifestyle, responsibilities and world view - the most dramatic of which tend to happen in a man's 20s as 30s as he gets a proper job, starts a family, buys a house etc. (at least one of which still applies to most people).

So what you wore (or drove) 20 years ago, though it might have looked good at the time and suited your life then, often no longer fits who you are today. Just because you don't wear those skinny jeans and cuban heeled boots anymore - or drive a cool old car that broke down every second week - doesn't mean buying them in the first place was a rash decision or they weren't the perfect choice at the time. I have some stuff (which for whatever reason I never get around to donating or selling) which I wore quite a bit when I was younger, but it just isn't "me" anymore. I actually think of it as someone else's wardrobe.

Conversely, I can't imagine wearing the 'old man' duds that I wear now when I was 20.

This is why I find iGents' attempts at 'permanent style' and MC uniforms so absurd. You can no more have a permanent style than you can a permanent lifestyle - which is only possible if you don't grow as a person (e.g. Foo - literally and metaphorically).

I agree. Our tastes change & nothing remains static. But thinking before you leap allows you to avoid - partially or completely - that typical initial progression from schlub to iGent that we all invariably go through to some degree where you buy the discounted "approved brand" in the non-staple colour, or slightly weird pattern because it is "a Brioni, a Attolini, a brand that ends in any vowel. Avoiding these pitfalls allows you to build a flexible wardrobe at any age. Of course you will continue to cull and add over time.
 

Rambo

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Is Men's Ex online? I'd like to see that lookbook.
 

Thruth

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Is this the self help groupie thread where we make a circle and confess to each other about our bad spending habits?

After accumulating quite a few pieces of clothings during 2008 downturn, I am now much more austere in terms of the number of purchases. But I must confess that I did splurge on bespeaking a pair of JLP shoes just last year.

I am a big admirer of a well thought out wardrobe with interchangeable pieces. I think in the most recent Men's Ex issue, they had an article of making a unique month long look book using less than 30 pieces of clothing, including accessories. There were three suits, three pants, three jackets, 3 pairs of shoes, etc. I would love to modify my wardrobe to that level.

The worst that could happen to anyone's style is to become a clothing trader like many on SF; constantly buying and selling his own 'inventory' to fund the next purchase.

A perfect example of thinking which does not necessarily occur at the outset of dressing well. Sometimes it doesn't occur at all. I think that is where they voracious consumption of SF etc. lead people astray.
 

Journeyman

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A perfect example of thinking which does not necessarily occur at the outset of dressing well. Sometimes it doesn't occur at all. I think that is where they voracious consumption of SF etc. lead people astray.

SF is, to me, a particularly interesting example.

Whilst there are some SF members who do like to refer to the "iGent hype cycle", there's still a large insistence on SF that most of the discussions on SF are about style, not fashion, with the idea that style is more permanent, or classic, as opposed to fashion, which is ephemeral and fleeting.

Nonetheless, despite this idea on SF of style being more permanent, there are regular bouts of enthusiasm over certain brands or certain styles of clothing. This seems more common with shoes than with most other items of clothing, but you still see it with certain companies that make jackets, suits, shirts and so on. So, every now and then there'll be a frenzy over Santoni, or Ferragamo Tramezza, or Edward Green, or C&J, or John Lobb Paris, or Carmina, or Meermin and so on and people will be ordering two or three pairs or more.

So, even though the general idea of style (grey trousers, navy jacket, sky blue or white shirt) might be more permanent, there are still definite shifts or trends present on SF and when the general body of members on SF latches on to something it can be quite a feeding frenzy for a while, until the hype around that item dies down and the next big thing is identified.
 

Thruth

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SF is, to me, a particularly interesting example.

Whilst there are some SF members who do like to refer to the "iGent hype cycle", there's still a large insistence on SF that most of the discussions on SF are about style, not fashion, with the idea that style is more permanent, or classic, as opposed to fashion, which is ephemeral and fleeting.

Nonetheless, despite this idea on SF of style being more permanent, there are regular bouts of enthusiasm over certain brands or certain styles of clothing. This seems more common with shoes than with most other items of clothing, but you still see it with certain companies that make jackets, suits, shirts and so on. So, every now and then there'll be a frenzy over Santoni, or Ferragamo Tramezza, or Edward Green, or C&J, or John Lobb Paris, or Carmina, or Meermin and so on and people will be ordering two or three pairs or more.

So, even though the general idea of style (grey trousers, navy jacket, sky blue or white shirt) might be more permanent, there are still definite shifts or trends present on SF and when the general body of members on SF latches on to something it can be quite a feeding frenzy for a while, until the hype around that item dies down and the next big thing is identified.

Good point. I can remember when Ferregamo was popular and highly regarded on SF & now all but forgotten. But the shoe feeding frenzy is driven by can I get GYW, MTO shoes for AE second prices!

No matter what we think, in many cases the brain is over-ridden by the eyes.
 

doghouse

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If the SF crowd ever start to frenzy on Foster&Son shoes, imma pay a Chinese hacker to crash the place. I can't countenance being associated with a SF trend.
 

Thruth

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If the SF crowd ever start to frenzy on Foster&Son shoes, imma pay a Chinese hacker to crash the place. I can't countenance being associated with a SF trend.

Too late Brother. They have an afiliate thread
 

Russell Street

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But thinking before you leap allows you to avoid - partially or completely - that typical initial progression from schlub to iGent that we all invariably go through to some degree where you buy the discounted "approved brand" in the non-staple colour, or slightly weird pattern because it is "a Brioni, a Attolini, a brand that ends in any vowel. Avoiding these pitfalls allows you to build a flexible wardrobe at any age.
Patience is a virtue and a severe lack of it is a large part of the problem. The recently minted clothing nerd is like the virgin in the whorehouse.
That Patrick06790 dude gave some of the greatest thrifting advice ever when he advised that you'll leave empty-handed 9 out of 10 times.
As I type wearing a 20+year old sweater, I am well aware that clothing can last a long time and there is no rush to amass anything.
On the cull front, I'm very big on forcing myself to endure bad purchases and use them as a continual reminder of the mistake so that it does not get repeated.
 

doghouse

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Too late Brother. They have an afiliate thread

i-dont-want-to-live-on-this-planet-anymore-11372-400x250.jpg
 

chogall

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Is Men's Ex online? I'd like to see that lookbook.

It has iPhone/iTunes version. The column is "Mr.Davidの1ヶ月コーディネート" (Mr. David's One Month Coordinate/Coordination), which appeared on the November issue and the April issue.
 
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Thruth

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Patience is a virtue and a severe lack of it is a large part of the problem. The recently minted clothing nerd is like the virgin in the whorehouse.
That Patrick06790 dude gave some of the greatest thrifting advice ever when he advised that you'll leave empty-handed 9 out of 10 times.
As I type wearing a 20+year old sweater, I am well aware that clothing can last a long time and there is no rush to amass anything.
On the cull front, I'm very big on forcing myself to endure bad purchases and use them as a continual reminder of the mistake so that it does not get repeated.

Wear stuff until it falls apart! I think part of this ethos is not coveting what others have.
 

Zé Ferreira

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Re: Fashion vs. Style / Timeless vs. Trendy.

I still get shot down when I talk about lapels getting thicker and button-point dropping back down off the sternum. :sadwhy:
Scoffed and :notbad:'d
 

Russell Street

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I still get shot down when I talk about lapels getting thicker and button-point dropping back down off the sternum. :sadwhy:
It's more possible that lapels disappear entirely than stay at 2" or whatever. And I'm pretty sure people will tire of their bellies sticking out from under coats rather soon.
Why are there no spreadsheets in this thread like over here?
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/forum/showthread.php?191898-budgeting
I only read the first post, but boy is that this thread in a nutshell. Newb unhappy about buying a black Men's Wearhouse suit, because the net dislikes black, tries mathematical shenanigens to justify spending 2/3 his clothing budget on a used Kiton suit because of its "impact."
:seriously:
 

Rambo

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Yid can be taken as a slur for a Jewish person. You didn't mean it that way, you probably meant it as an insult for large hairy people. It's a close line to tow.
I've honestly never heard it used for that before.
 

Zé Ferreira

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Was unaware of the hair reference. I fully know the jew reference.

First thought was a Tottenham Hotspur reference.

Was just making up another FTFY, trying to be as offensive as possible, really.
 
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