Why Are You Pissed Off Today?

Rambo

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I'm sure you hate dealing with the Indian call centre people too.
i think the indians are better actually but i see less and less of them these days. the representatives in the phillippines are just SO dumb. they don't seem to train these people at all.
 

Journeyman

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Somehow I associated you and backpacking to touring places like Kyoto, Hokkaido, Singapore, Taipei...the more civilised places.

I didn't know you roughed it.
You're correct - I did spend months backpacking around Japan, and went to Singapore, Taiwan, Guangzhou in China, and Hong Kong.

However, I also spent three months hiking around Indonesia (including East Timor, which was still part of Indonesia), two months in Malaysia and a couple of weeks in Thailand.
 

fxh

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But your local resources don't speak English with an inflection acceptable to yanks which is why Philippines commands a premium over India in the world of call centres.
Never really thought of that aspect. I don’t have good experiences with Philippines call centres.
Indians and Australians work pretty well together, we’ve got cricket, we both like beating the poms, and most have a similar sense of humour and both nations have managed to salvage some good out of English colonisation.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Never really thought of that aspect. I don’t have good experiences with Philippines call centres.
Indians and Australians work pretty well together, we’ve got cricket, we both like beating the poms, and most have a similar sense of humour and both nations have managed to salvage some good out of English colonisation.
Be thankful you weren't colonized by the French, Belgians, or if the Japanese had made it through Burma.

The common benchmark of successful ex-colonies is the Brit system of Common Law.
 

Fwiffo

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Be thankful you weren't colonized by the French, Belgians, or if the Japanese had made it through Burma.

The common benchmark of successful ex-colonies is the Brit system of Common Law.
You forgot a few things. Drinking tea during the afternoon in the middle of 40c weather, the pursuit of sport like football/cricket/rugby/snooker, the Victorian education of girls with piano, the propensity to queue in the more mature colonies, and at least in the mid to upper class a deference to authority like a constitutional monarchy.
 

Fwiffo

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Never really thought of that aspect. I don’t have good experiences with Philippines call centres.
Indians and Australians work pretty well together, we’ve got cricket, we both like beating the poms, and most have a similar sense of humour and both nations have managed to salvage some good out of English colonisation.
A lot of the colonizing was done by the Scots.

It's the constant complaint of North Americans against Indians. The bloody accent. Elevators are lifts. Trucks are lorries. Etc.
 

fxh

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You forgot a few things. Drinking tea during the afternoon in the middle of 40c weather, the pursuit of sport like football/cricket/rugby/snooker, the Victorian education of girls with piano, the propensity to queue in the more mature colonies, and at least in the mid to upper class a deference to authority like a constitutional monarchy.
Ha. The biggest adjustment newcomers to our Godzone have to make is understanding, then learning, “Australian Queuing”
 

Fwiffo

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Nothing like sitting through a conference call with a customer who has informally put your account into review and has an army of auditors trying to find ways to say you breached the contract or aren't performing.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Nothing like sitting through a conference call with a customer who has informally put your account into review and has an army of auditors trying to find ways to say you breached the contract or aren't performing.
When it get's to that stage, in a big organisation, best to hand it over to the corporate lawyers and plead the plausible deniability ticket. Let them run with it and get on with the workable clients. Otherwise you will end up carrying the can.
 

Fwiffo

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When it get's to that stage, in a big organisation, best to hand it over to the corporate lawyers and plead the plausible deniability ticket. Let them run with it and get on with the workable clients. Otherwise you will end up carrying the can.
Well, the thing is this client partner is raising hell with tech security, SLAs and performance, how and what we use their data for, and physical office restrictions. When I started connecting the dots between the different departments getting slammed with requests I said it sounds like they want to find an excuse to say we are in breach and therefore ditch us. I think that's when the legal people get involved to argue ourselves out of it.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Well, the thing is this client partner is raising hell with tech security, SLAs and performance, how and what we use their data for, and physical office restrictions. When I started connecting the dots between the different departments getting slammed with requests I said it sounds like they want to find an excuse to say we are in breach and therefore ditch us. I think that's when the legal people get involved to argue ourselves out of it.
How I would play that, verbally, not in an email or letter: ''Do you want my legal people to take over?'' Raise hands, ''If you do, no problem....''
 

Dropbear

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An old army mate killed himself this weekend. I'd heard that he wasn't doing so well and checked-in on him on significant anniversaries and odd times, but it was always uncomfortable. It felt like talking to a stranger. We could reminisce again about some of the better times and the friends we lost for a few minutes, but we were just repeating the same stories over again. After that, it went downhill. He was clearly unhappy with his life and I knew I was talking to a ghost of the person I knew so well, for a short time long ago. I sorta told myself that it wasn't the same person so I wouldn't feel guilty for not being there for him more.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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An old army mate killed himself this weekend. I'd heard that he wasn't doing so well and checked-in on him on significant anniversaries and odd times, but it was always uncomfortable. It felt like talking to a stranger. We could reminisce again about some of the better times and the friends we lost for a few minutes, but we were just repeating the same stories over again. After that, it went downhill. He was clearly unhappy with his life and I knew I was talking to a ghost of the person I knew so well, for a short time long ago. I sorta told myself that it wasn't the same person so I wouldn't feel guilty for not being there for him more.
I wouldn't beat myself up about that. A male friend should, to paraphrase Oscar Wilde by Oliver Reed: feed, amuse, entertain or shock you. If you hang on to the hangers on out of loyalty, you'll never travel and will still be in the same pubs and tap houses of your youth.

You have to move on, everyone changes. And as you well know, once you have kids, it draws an iron curtain over those who don't.

Last year a mucca of mine, who I was very tight with at one time contacted me, but he hadn't been in touch since 2012 and I was the last of the two to make contact. He gave no update to his life, or circumstances, but said please entertain me with your wit because I miss it. So I told to him to fuck right-off and not make the mistake I was this mythical joker figure of his past. As it should be.

There comes a time when you realize all those friends were merely associates on life's highway.
 

Fwiffo

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An old army mate killed himself this weekend. I'd heard that he wasn't doing so well and checked-in on him on significant anniversaries and odd times, but it was always uncomfortable. It felt like talking to a stranger. We could reminisce again about some of the better times and the friends we lost for a few minutes, but we were just repeating the same stories over again. After that, it went downhill. He was clearly unhappy with his life and I knew I was talking to a ghost of the person I knew so well, for a short time long ago. I sorta told myself that it wasn't the same person so I wouldn't feel guilty for not being there for him more.
Sorry for your loss. It sounds like you did all you could to help him get to the next chapter.
 

Rambo

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An old army mate killed himself this weekend. I'd heard that he wasn't doing so well and checked-in on him on significant anniversaries and odd times, but it was always uncomfortable. It felt like talking to a stranger. We could reminisce again about some of the better times and the friends we lost for a few minutes, but we were just repeating the same stories over again. After that, it went downhill. He was clearly unhappy with his life and I knew I was talking to a ghost of the person I knew so well, for a short time long ago. I sorta told myself that it wasn't the same person so I wouldn't feel guilty for not being there for him more.
sorry for your loss. i know its hard to not feel like you should have done more. maybe you could have, maybe you couldn't. but at least you tried. that's more than you can say for the overwhelming majority.
 

Journeyman

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Dropbear Dropbear - That's a bummer and I'm sorry to hear that. It's very hard not to feel some guilt about these things, even if it's not your fault.

One of my friends from university committed suicide shortly after we finished university. Even though it wasn't my fault - it was because he was suffering from depression, was unsure about what he wanted to do with his life, felt that he'd never have a good career and didn't fit in and so on - I still felt responsible and I still felt that there was something I should have done, some way that I could have helped him.

I don't think that was the case. However, it's natural to feel that way and to ask yourself whether you could have done more, and what would have happened if you'd done more.
 

Fwiffo

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I still felt responsible and I still felt that there was something I should have done, some way that I could have helped him.
Ultimately you can't live that person's life for them.

I remember I bumped into someone I met during my uni days when I was working during the summer. You had to have some brains to come from the school he did and in spite of him liking Prince and me N sync or Backstreet Boys we got along and kept in touch. One time he messaged me and said he had a question about the main rail station that I live down the street from and I realised he stayed there overnight. Got into a fight with his grandmother or aunt or something. I invited him to stay at my one bedroom flat. He was okay but clearly had alcohol and other addiction issues. He was banned from some pubs and bars within a 2km radius of his old workplace. It was pointless to take him anywhere respectable. He even got into a fight with a bouncer at a strip club.

I was flying to the States for work Sunday/Monday to Friday every week so I let him just stay on the sofa. For three months he would mob me for money, food and alcohol every time I got off the plane until I berated him till he left. H appears to still post something once a year on Facebook so I assume he is alive somewhere.
 
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