Good Articles That Don't Deserve Their Own Threads

Fwiffo

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If formby or Lord Buckley wrote the screenplay then there'd be an honour killing, niqabs galore and some second or third wife burnt at a stake or beheaded.

If Journeyman wrote the screenplay you may get a chuckle or two at sly digs on class and generational differences amongst Muslims.
 

formby

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If formby or Lord Buckley wrote the screenplay then there'd be an honour killing, niqabs galore and some second or third wife burnt at a stake or beheaded.

If Journeyman wrote the screenplay you may get a chuckle or two at sly digs on class and generational differences amongst Muslims.
What the fuck are you talking about you idiot...

Go back to regaling us about the boring minutiae of your life you solipsistic tit...
 

Lord Buckley

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If formby or Lord Buckley wrote the screenplay then there'd be an honour killing, niqabs galore and some second or third wife burnt at a stake or beheaded.
Whilst it feels right to make mockery of pre-Medieval practices...it is really silly to place niqabs galore in any film, be it comedy or tragedy. The characterisation and empathy will be totally lacking, whilst jokes about post box ladies will only be funny the first or second time around for children. They're not so dumb. Ultimately the Ealing comedy aspects would fail, but you could bring third wave feminists undergoing FGM to free themselves and desensitize themselves from the patriarchy and male gaze. You could have them queuing up for the procedure, which will not be far from the truth in 10 years time.
 

fxh

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The Netherlands is a small, densely populated country, with more than 1,300 inhabitants per square mile. It’s bereft of almost every resource long thought to be necessary for large-scale agriculture. Yet it’s the globe’s number two exporter of food as measured by value, second only to the United States, which has 270 times its landmass. How on Earth have the Dutch done it?

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/holland-agriculture-sustainable-farming/
 

Lord Buckley

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The Netherlands is a small, densely populated country, with more than 1,300 inhabitants per square mile. It’s bereft of almost every resource long thought to be necessary for large-scale agriculture. Yet it’s the globe’s number two exporter of food as measured by value, second only to the United States, which has 270 times its landmass. How on Earth have the Dutch done it?

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/holland-agriculture-sustainable-farming/
Most of the population is concentrated in the Randstad: Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam conurbations. So you don't have to travel far to find yourself in areas of outstanding if somewhat flat natural beauty and the so called Groene Hart. I'm on the border of all that, and there are a great many large green houses here with rare orchids, tomatoes and other foods.

If you go north east of Amsterdam into Felvoland and Friesland there's some very fine villages on waterways. Then you have the rolling hills and countryside of Limburg around Maastricht.

East again to Arnhem and there's large forests and cottages that look like they're from a fairy tale.

If you want to see the real beauty of The Netherlands you need to get out of the main cities.
 
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Fwiffo

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Is it all downhill after 35?

Why wasn't this in the advert for those interested in being alive?

First 10 or 15 years you're a clueless git. Then you only get 20 good years. Afterwards, you're down hill. With modern medicine, it could be 50 or 60 years of going down hill.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Paddling your own canoe. Down the Amazon. A woman on your own.

Hats off for the spirit of adventure - if it all works out.

But there are dangers that you may encounter and it may not end well.
So many ways to die, except for a few select pristine areas, the jungles of South America are full of desperate diamond and wildcat gold miners polluting the water table with mercury. And if they don't get a single person on their own, especially a female, the rest of the jungle will. Impossible to traverse as a single person outside of a planned expedition.

No one travels alone in the jungle.
 

John Lee Pettimore III

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Fwiffo

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Will the Rohingya Exodus Be Aung San Suu Kyi's Fall From Grace?

"This is how icons fall. The U.S. had championed Suu Kyi not just as the great savior of her country but also as the model of nonviolent disobedience in Southeast Asia....Now she has revealed different priorities. 'She sees herself very deliberately now as a political actor inside of a changing Burma, not as an icon that essentially speaks out on human rights,' says Ben Rhodes, President Barack Obama's Deputy National Security Adviser. 'Her single-minded pursuit of that objective of political reform inside of Burma has created a very glaring and tragic blind spot.'"

To quote the institutions that educated her and the birthplace of her late spouse and children, "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Even Nobel Peace Prize winners are human.
 

Journeyman

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I wasn't quite sure where I should post this article - it's interesting, in a "stop the world, I want to get off" kind of way:

"Is fashion modern? New MOMA curator discusses the most iconic clothing items, from the LBD to the hijab"

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...s-leather-new-york-curator-name-a7972371.html

The article makes some interesting - albeit rather obvious - points about how wearing different clothing can mean that you are perceived differently (duh!) and about how it's now common for the ultra-rich to dress down in jeans and a hoodie, rather than wearing a tailored suit.

This bit, however, made me feel like banging my head on the desk:

Our clothes are the interface between our soul and the world. They can function as filters, armor, amplifiers, and more. Through fashion, we can communicate many different states of mind, from allegiance to indifference, insecurity, availability, open-mindedness. From these lists of attributes and nouns, we can extrapolate how crucial fashion is our lives. Considering it vacuous means not understanding that in this day and age, even more than in the past, communicating has become the centre of our existence.

Moreover, the fashion industry is one of the most important players in the global markets, fundamental in any consideration about sustainability, labour practices, human rights, and more.

Not acknowledging the importance of fashion is almost delusional.



I really think that this person lives in a bubble. Sure, for some people, fashion and clothing is important and it plays a role in how they see themselves and how they want the world to see them.

For a lot of people, though - billions of people - clothes are simply something they wear while doing back-breaking, poorly-paid work.
 

fxh

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People who talk about communicating then go on to demonstrate a lack of knowledge of fundamentals such as Shannon's basic schema about noise , channels, etc cause me to roll my eyes significantly.
 

Fwiffo

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Football, beer and Mountain Dew: Britain's evolving 'special relationship' with the U.S.

"'A bit of American doesn't hurt anybody,' said Amber Piper of Northern Ireland who was shopping for the day on Regent Street. 'I love American culture, I think it's just completely different to British,' she said, describing Americans as 'a lot more enthusiastic.'"

Americans are more enthusiastic. It shows in this forum.

"Bud Light, the top-selling beer brand in the U.S., landed in British supermarkets and pubs earlier this year to little protest. The makers of Bud Light heralded its U.K. launch by repainting London red double-decker buses blue and declaring in bold white letters: 'It's smoothified. We're American, we can make up words.'"

Bud Light is smoothified - so that's why it tastes like that!

"'He'd love to sell the original Mountain Dew — it's 'really nice,' he said — but it contains too much sodium benzoate, a chemical food preservative regulated by the EU."

Mountain Dew is poisonous under EU regulation....but aaafter Brexit?

"Engel, who describes himself as 'one of the very few people in this country who's a baseball fan,' has noticed an increased prevalence of the sport's terminology here....'Almost no one else in Britain has the faintest idea what 'stepping up to the plate' means and yet they're using it all the time,'"

Same as Americans using words like tosser or copper or bollocks or chips and not having an idea what it means.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Bud Light is disgusting.
And for very little calorie efficiency. It must be a re-launch in the UK, as it was widely available along with the dreadful Miller-Lite, during the Ice chemical beer craze in the UK.

Proletariat piss water lager taken to it's extreme in the dystopia of the Chem-Brew canning and bottling factories of lager deconstruction. A non-lager beer, ideal for the post-modernist world where even lager has no meaning and the buzz can be removed so you can drink a whole crate in one sitting at home.

Some say the brewers got greedy, I wouldn't necessarily describe it that. It was almost like suicide: Let's do away with the local boozer and have shorter distribution networks. Cut out the landlord completely!
 

Fwiffo

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https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/op...ttps://www.theglobeandmail.com&service=mobile

"Ms. Khan is the black-robed student activist who got pushback after she urged people to boycott Canada Day. 'F*** you all,' she responded in one post. 'Be proud of this country? For what, over 400 years of genocide?' For good riddance, she signed off with the hashtag #whitefragilitycankissmyass."

Yeah she sounds like a keeper for Canada.
 

formby

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There's never been a dictatorship of the proletariat, they were always elite conspiracies....er........vanguards.

It's was one of the things that made them so attractive to western fellow travellers.
 

Fwiffo

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Wouldn't it be much easier, and shorter, to write a list of faculty members who *aren't* left-leaning?
I read another article in the paper today where academics were protesting a decision to invite a far right nationalist from Germany to come speak at a conference on right-wing populism on the basis that he had no right to express himself and inviting him would legitimize his views. Presumably listening to professors denounce ideas without actually hearing what they are is better.

Strange things are happening in academia.
 
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