Music Of The Moment

Pimpernel Smith

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I'd rather listen to Phil than U2 any day.
And - unlike youse two - I know what I'm talking about
No argument against personal preference. The last time I tried to listen to a U2 album was on a road trip down to Monaco with my coke fiend boss and we bought their latest CD from a service station and it was like, what the?! Straight back to the Roxy Music and David Bowie CD's.

I like the moody stuff he does solo and with Genesis. His Motown tinged stuff, not so much, but as said, he's a great musician, arranger and songwriter, and when the late Neil Peart says you're a good drummer, you're a fucking good drummer.

U2's last good album was Achtung Baby (1991), some of their early 80s stuff is good too. However, they've been an irrelevance for a long time, once they started to ring the White House up on stage they disappeared up their own fundamental orifices. Game over.
Sadly, Bono was always a pretentious gobshite...the re-edition DVD of Live Under A Blood Red Sky at Red Rocks is embarrassing. When you see him with his shirt off pontificating about the video going out to the world and say's to the audience ''Say hello, Tokyo....'' etc, he's actually slightly plump with what looks like water retention. All that use of flags too, like some member of a worker brigade.

After Rattle and Hum it was all over for me. Unlike UB40 another band who carried on into total mediocrity, I still don't feel embarrassed about having been a fan. And I can still listen to quite a few UB40 albums.

His Motown stuff was unfortunate. Not even a pale imitation. Still Kylie did Locomotion. So us Australians can’t hold our head up.
My uncle was the spitting image of Phil Collins. As you can imagine, he was a big fan in the 80s, naming a couple of his businesses after Phil Collins albums/songs/bands. Phil is crippled now and doesn't look good at all.

I've always rated pop music very highly.
Is there any other kind of music?
 

Journeyman

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^ When my father was still living in London in the late 1940s, he was coming home from work with a couple of other men when they saw Bing Crosby on the street.

One of them called out, "Sing, Bing, Sing!" and, to his credit, Bing stopped and sang a song for them while they were standing on footpath in the middle of London.

Apparently, Bing didn't actually sound that impressive but, then again, he was standing on a street in London in late autumn or early winter doing a solo impromptu performance, so it was hardly surprising that he didn't sound as good as his studio recordings.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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^ When my father was still living in London in the late 1940s, he was coming home from work with a couple of other men when they saw Bing Crosby on the street.

One of them called out, "Sing, Bing, Sing!" and, to his credit, Bing stopped and sang a song for them while they were standing on footpath in the middle of London.

Apparently, Bing didn't actually sound that impressive but, then again, he was standing on a street in London in late autumn or early winter doing a solo impromptu performance, so it was hardly surprising that he didn't sound as good as his studio recordings.
As the original crooner, he may have been having a bad day with all that London fog and all.

He was also one of the first to invest in tape technologies after the war. The reason being he did a lot of live radio shows and he wanted to record them so he could spend more time on the golf course.

I re-watched Road to Bali yesterday, a very long time since I've watched that. Those Road... movies the American patter was always spot on.
 

Kingstonian

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^ When my father was still living in London in the late 1940s, he was coming home from work with a couple of other men when they saw Bing Crosby on the street.

One of them called out, "Sing, Bing, Sing!" and, to his credit, Bing stopped and sang a song for them while they were standing on footpath in the middle of London.

Apparently, Bing didn't actually sound that impressive but, then again, he was standing on a street in London in late autumn or early winter doing a solo impromptu performance, so it was hardly surprising that he didn't sound as good as his studio recordings.
As they say in Glasgow :-

‘What’s the difference between Bing Crosby and Walt Disney?’

Answer :-

‘Bing sings and Walt disnae.’
 

Kingstonian

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Miss McLeods.

The popular reel by a rural American band. Straightforward rendition. Only the vocalising at the end gives a clue to the nationality of the performers. Interesting example of musical crossovers.

That said, although it is an old record, it lacks the lift and grace notes of the Sligo fiddle players - Coleman, Morrison and Killoran, recording in New York at the same time and reshaping Irish music in the process.


Marvellous yoke for playing old records too!
 

Pimpernel Smith

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5,628
Miss McLeods.

The popular reel by a rural American band. Straightforward rendition. Only the vocalising at the end gives a clue to the nationality of the performers. Interesting example of musical crossovers.

That said, although it is an old record, it lacks the lift and grace notes of the Sligo fiddle players - Coleman, Morrison and Killoran, recording in New York at the same time and reshaping Irish music in the process.


Marvellous yoke for playing old records too!
You'll be glad to know that The Pogues at the BBC is out two days.

Just got my Bluesound Vault 2 back from being fixed. What a relief to be streaming in HiRes again after being stuck with CD's for two weeks.

 

Pimpernel Smith

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I could never warm to Simply Red (a couple of songs I like mainly covers versions) but he has a great voice.

Mrs F. is a big fan and has dragged me to several of their concerts over the years.

This is a lovely song. Cole Porter was a genius.

Picture Book was magnificent and Big Love was excellent, the inbetween albums come across as sterile session musician fodder to me. He's a big flirt with the ladies, as my mum and sister found out at the post-concert party back in Manchester in the 90s. But if you're that ugly, you have to be.

The Thompson Twins were up there for me including their version of Revolution:

 

formby002

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Picture Book was magnificent and Big Love was excellent, the inbetween albums come across as sterile session musician fodder to me. He's a big flirt with the ladies, as my mum and sister found out at the post-concert party back in Manchester in the 90s. But if you're that ugly, you have to be.



The Thompson Twins were up there for me including their version of Revolution:

Old Micky is a premier league shagger. Good for him...

The Thompson Twins produced some sophisticated, very well produced pop music.


 

fxh

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I could never warm to Simply Red (a couple of songs I like mainly covers versions) but he has a great voice.

Mrs F. is a big fan and has dragged me to several of their concerts over the years.
Ms. fxh - was a fan at one stage a few years back and I had to put up with him loud ON MY MUSIC SYSTEM!!!!

I understand he was a bit more ubiquitous in UK??

He did a good job on some covers but seeing we had the originals it was a bit uncalled for. I could imagine with a good band a a bit of restraint he might be not un enjoyable
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Ms. fxh - was a fan at one stage a few years back and I had to put up with him loud ON MY MUSIC SYSTEM!!!!

I understand he was a bit more ubiquitous in UK??

He did a good job on some covers but seeing we had the originals it was a bit uncalled for. I could imagine with a good band a a bit of restraint he might be not un enjoyable
Like Prince was the thinking man's Michael Jackson, so too is Mick Hucknall the thinking man's Michael Bolton.
 

fxh

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When I saw them out here the whole first half was a production of Greendale. It wasn't exactly gripping but it was fascinating to see what Neil was up to. Funny little houses etc on the stage set. Its good sometimes to see your heros indulging themselves. In my book he was allowed to.

The second half with Crazy Horse at full tilt was magnificent - maybe getting Greendale out of his system made for a great set later.
 

Dropbear

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Some serious androgynous stuff going on there. Not quite my cup of tea, I think Marilyn Manson does that look better.
Germans influenced by the Smiths, Bowie, the Cure, Bauhaus, etc.

The lyrics are crap but I’m enjoying the sound. Sort of like the dude from Placebo playing in an 80s tribute band.
 

fxh

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I wouldn't kiss Bruce Springsteen,
Jackson Brown or Leonard Cohen
But I know someone who'd love to shift the drummer in Status Quo,
and I wouldn't drop the lámh on Bono"
There'd be far too many legal wrangles
But Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to touch the Bangles

I wouldn't kiss AC/DC
Or Lemmy from Motorhead
I wouldn't kiss Tom Petty
Tina Turner or the Grateful Dead.
And I wouldnlt kiss Mr Tambourine Man
No Matter how he jingle jangles
But Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to kiss The Bangles

I'd love to have it off with Susanna Hoffs
I'd love to have it off with Susanna Hoffs
I'd love to have it off with Susanna Hoffs
... my favorite's Vicky actually,

I wouldn't kiss Liam O'manlai
Guns And Roses or Muddy Waters
I wouldn't kiss Brian Wilson
Or his Lovely Yankee Daughters
And Shane McGowan is not my type
Because his teeth are green and mangled

But Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to bang the Bangles
Oh Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to bang the Bangles
 
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