The All-Inclusive Shoe & Boot Thread

florisgreen

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That is the whole point. Lower costs to manufacture, and to heck with quality shoe construction. Trade on your name and charge big prices to increase profit. Target dumb customers, and talk about dressing down in style during covid, and comfort (easy to suck people in with those dumb arguments). Numerous big names are doing it now, they are following each other and realise selling to dummies is profitable.

Snob appeal.

Companies realise there are heaps of dumb guys around, that is why it is becoming so popular.

Yes, all the major players with few exceptions are riding this wave.
 

Journeyman

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I never thought I’d see the day that athleisure is twisted and turned into luxury/preppy territory. Impressive mental gymnastics.

This has been happening for years now.

Haute couture brands that were formerly known for their high quality outfits now sell t-shirts, nylon jackets and hideous, blobby sneakers that are all emblazoned with oversize, repeated logos or brand names - and people buy them. These old fashion houses now make more money than ever, all by selling streetwear as luxury goods.
 

Ambrosius08

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Messages
181
This has been happening for years now.

Haute couture brands that were formerly known for their high quality outfits now sell t-shirts, nylon jackets and hideous, blobby sneakers that are all emblazoned with oversize, repeated logos or brand names - and people buy them. These old fashion houses now make more money than ever, all by selling streetwear as luxury goods.
Yeah. Many people consider one to be well-dressed if one wears a plain t-shirt with some prestigious logo printed on it, combined with ripped jeans and a bonded leather belt with a buckle that spells BOSS.

It’s a shame to see so many previously outstanding names such as Burberry and Dior reduced to churning out cheaply made bling for the chavs.
 

fxh

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1630403460951.png


https://whatsnew2day.com/community-...emaker-jim-saad-dies-after-contracting-covid/

A Sydney community mourns the death of a ‘humble cobbler’ who brought smiles to locals’ faces for the past 60 years before being hit by Covid-19.

Jim Saad, 80, ran shoe repairs and key cutters at Milsons Point station. Luna Park.

The Kirribilli community says the area will ‘never be the same’ and has flooded its storefront with flowers and moving tributes to show his family how much he meant to locals, who passed his shop every day on their way to their home. work.

Saad died of a heart attack last Saturday, six days after contracting the coronavirus.
 

Sammy Ambrose

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View attachment 40999

https://whatsnew2day.com/community-...emaker-jim-saad-dies-after-contracting-covid/

A Sydney community mourns the death of a ‘humble cobbler’ who brought smiles to locals’ faces for the past 60 years before being hit by Covid-19.

Jim Saad, 80, ran shoe repairs and key cutters at Milsons Point station. Luna Park.

The Kirribilli community says the area will ‘never be the same’ and has flooded its storefront with flowers and moving tributes to show his family how much he meant to locals, who passed his shop every day on their way to their home. work.

Saad died of a heart attack last Saturday, six days after contracting the coronavirus.
Great pic and RIP.

I wonder how much longer endangered species such as these have left?

I spend my time between the Middle East, UK and Canada. In those three places, I now only have one competent cobbler - Dave, a Jamaican- British-Canadian on Toronto's Young Street.
 

ballmouse

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301
Great pic and RIP.

I wonder how much longer endangered species such as these have left?

I spend my time between the Middle East, UK and Canada. In those three places, I now only have one competent cobbler - Dave, a Jamaican- British-Canadian on Toronto's Young Street.

Not a cobbler, but the pattern maker I was working with passed away at age 78 from a heart attack. He died less than 2 weeks after I saw him and less than a week after he shipped the new pattern to me. It was a shock when I found out what happened.

All his knowledge gone just like that. And it's not like when an employee quits and the company gets someone else and everything is ho hum.

Everyone who worked with him is now scrambling to find someone or will just stop that part of their business altogether. Hell, I wonder what's going to happen to all the materials he had. He had racks of patterns stored in his basement. Not to mention he probably had a bit saved on his computer as well.
 

Sammy Ambrose

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746
Did they shift manufacturing from China to Japan? They are Chinese-made.
Yes. These do seem to be hand-welted in China and sold in Singapore.

There are a couple of reviews of the brand on YouTube. Kirby clown does one but it's hard to get past his self-promotion and scrawny neck.

Have you examined the workmanship closely Floris?
 

florisgreen

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1,543
Did they shift manufacturing from China to Japan? They are Chinese-made.
Yes. These do seem to be hand-welted in China and sold in Singapore.

There are a couple of reviews of the brand on YouTube. Kirby clown does one but it's hard to get past his self-promotion and scrawny neck.

Have you examined the workmanship closely Floris?

Complying with the description in their website the shoes are made in Japan. Of course I can't verify it.

Screenshot (671).png
 

florisgreen

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1,543
I wonder how much longer endangered species such as these have left?
Not a cobbler, but the pattern maker I was working with passed away at age 78 from a heart attack. He died less than 2 weeks after I saw him and less than a week after he shipped the new pattern to me. It was a shock when I found out what happened.

All his knowledge gone just like that. And it's not like when an employee quits and the company gets someone else and everything is ho hum.

Everyone who worked with him is now scrambling to find someone or will just stop that part of their business altogether. Hell, I wonder what's going to happen to all the materials he had. He had racks of patterns stored in his basement. Not to mention he probably had a bit saved on his computer as well.

It's such a pity that these manual works have lost attractivity for the new generations and all the skills, expertise and great worksmanship are likely going to get lost with the old generations of workers.
 

The Shooman

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GYW shoos, a shock to my system

Over the last 4 - 5 months i've worn handmade shoos everyday, but today was a really nice day so l decided to wear the Big Johnny Lobb boys (gyw). The difference was really noticeable...like comparing a Rolls Royce to an old Ford with bad suspension. I felt like l was roughing it all day. I will get used to it over the Spring, but it did demonstrate the vast difference between hand welted v's machine welted AND hand stitched soles v's machine stitched soles. The prices for hand made would well be worth it IMO...you get a perfect ride, complete satisfaction. Too many compromises to the gyw ride, it's a massed produced car for the feet.
 

florisgreen

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Messages
1,543
GYW shoos, a shock to my system

Over the last 4 - 5 months i've worn handmade shoos everyday, but today was a really nice day so l decided to wear the Big Johnny Lobb boys (gyw). The difference was really noticeable...like comparing a Rolls Royce to an old Ford with bad suspension. I felt like l was roughing it all day. I will get used to it over the Spring, but it did demonstrate the vast difference between hand welted v's machine welted AND hand stitched soles v's machine stitched soles. The prices for hand made would well be worth it IMO...you get a perfect ride, complete satisfaction. Too many compromises to the gyw ride, it's a massed produced car for the feet.

Sad to discover that your big collection of goodyear shoes is not much worth.
 
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Dropbear

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6,566
It's such a pity that these manual works have lost attractivity for the new generations and all the skills, expertise and great worksmanship are likely going to get lost with the old generations of workers.

The number of coblers has obviously declined, but they are still out there in every big city. Often as part of a chain like ‘Houston Shoe Hospital’ or, like Brian the Bootmaker, finding a new niche for the new century:

 

The Shooman

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3,456
Sad to discover that your big collection of goodyear shoes is not much worth.

I can live with it. It is what it is. I still love all my shoes, every single pair. No regrets.

Fortunately most wouldn't know the difference between a Loake, a vass, a C&J and an Edward Green, so it doesn't really matter. Only shoomen, connoisseur and big daddies know about these things.
 

Panama

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Messages
606
I can live with it. It is what it is. I still love all my shoes, every single pair. No regrets.

Fortunately most wouldn't know the difference between a Loake, a vass, a C&J and an Edward Green, so it doesn't really matter. Only shoomen, connoisseur and big daddies know about these things.
I love my Loake's...
 

Thruth

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Came across some Dack's 150th anniversary PTB's in water bison from 1984. Tan and black. Dack's were part of the Canadian trifecta of GYW shoemakers along with Hartt and McHale. Me Da had 3 pairs of dress shoes. One blucher from each maker. Dack's were Cheaney/Church's quality shoes. $80 for both including shipping. Started thinking like a shoo scientist.

1630626829910.jpeg


Started with the tan pair.
1630623586853.jpeg


tempImageHOzdnl.png

Figured I'd strip them, re-dye them, smooth out the creases, put in new sock liners and have my cobbler resole them.

Washed them with saddle soap. Stripped them with Fiebings deglazer, which is an acetone-based product.

1630624283619.jpeg


Dyed them with Fiebings oxblood. Nicest and truest oxblood that I can get my hands on. Vass won't sell me or tell me who makes their oxblood dye, which is the nicest, even browner oxblood out there, but horses for courses & YMMV.

It is rather red prior to being applied. Leap of faith red. Glove broke.

1630626352739.jpeg


But the end result is a nice dark oxblood with subtle red and no purple. Did not cut it and used it straight. Did not paintbrush on thin coats. Used a wool dauber and just did continuous uniform coats until I hit on the depth of colour I wanted. Let dry overnight and re-assessed. Decided not to do more coats
1630624434749.png


Saphir Renovateur then their Hermes Red paste. Closest Saphir has to oxblood and it just deepens the red a bit without adding burgundy hues. I like the way it turned out.

1630624652772.png

1630624715304.jpeg


JR Rendenbach leather soles then rubber half sole. Cobbler built a new heel stack and finished with full rubber top cap and they are now Saskatchewan 4-season shoes without having to opt for lug soles. Softer rubber compound and better for snow and ice compared to the harder rubber compounds like Dainite. Same for snow tires. He uses pre-formed cork versus the hot cork goo. No gemming failure The Shooman The Shooman .

1630624860210.png


The black pair are at the cobbler's and I am picking them up tomorrow. He was replacing the welt when I popped in to get the polish. It's always cool to see a cobbler welting shoes and this guy is a whacky 6' 6" beanpole of an old hippie in a denim flat cap and he has the wingspan of Michael Gross. His shop is tiny and and narrow so he has to angle himself to be able to fully stick out his arms

The Shooman The Shooman , no gemming failure in the black pair either but the welt needed re-doing since there had been enough re-soles to perforate it so it should not be used again.
 
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ballmouse

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Messages
301
I was going to say that brown pair looked a little questionable. Then I saw the oxblood and they look nice. Great job.
 

The Ernesto

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413
Came across some Dack's 150th anniversary PTB's in water bison from 1984. Tan and black. Dack's were part of the Canadian trifecta of GYW shoemakers along with Hartt and McHale. Me Da had 3 pairs of dress shoes. One blucher from each maker. Dack's were Cheaney/Church's quality shoes. $80 for both including shipping. Started thinking like a shoo scientist.

View attachment 41099

Started with the tan pair.
View attachment 41089

View attachment 41090
Figured I'd strip them, re-dye them, smooth out the creases, put in new sock liners and have my cobbler resole them.

Washed them with saddle soap. Stripped them with Fiebings deglazer, which is an acetone-based product.

View attachment 41093

Dyed them with Fiebings oxblood. Nicest and truest oxblood that I can get my hands on. Vass won't sell me or tell me who makes their oxblood dye, which is the nicest, even browner oxblood out there, but horses for courses & YMMV.

It is rather red prior to being applied. Leap of faith red. Glove broke.

View attachment 41098

But the end result is a nice dark oxblood with subtle red and no purple. Did not cut it and used it straight. Did not paintbrush on thin coats. Used a wool dauber and just did continuous uniform coats until I hit on the depth of colour I wanted. Let dry overnight and re-assessed. Decided not to do more coats
View attachment 41094

Saphir Renovateur then their Hermes Red paste. Closest Saphir has to oxblood and it just deepens the red a bit without adding burgundy hues. I like the way it turned out.

View attachment 41095
View attachment 41096

JR Rendenbach leather soles then rubber half sole. Cobbler built a new heel stack and finished with full rubber top cap and they are now Saskatchewan 4-season shoes without having to opt for lug soles. Softer rubber compound and better for snow and ice compared to the harder rubber compounds like Dainite. Same for snow tires. He uses pre-formed cork versus the hot cork goo. No gemming failure The Shooman The Shooman .

View attachment 41097

The black pair are at the cobbler's and I am picking them up tomorrow. He was replacing the welt when I popped in to get the polish. It's always cool to see a cobbler welting shoes and this guy is a whacky 6' 6" beanpole of an old hippie in a denim flat cap and he has the wingspan of Michael Gross. His shop is tiny and and narrow so he has to angle himself to be able to fully stick out his arms

The Shooman The Shooman , no gemming failure in the black pair either but the welt needed re-doing since there had been enough re-soles to perforate it so it should not be used again.

Really great work. Thanks for showing this.
 

Sammy Ambrose

Well-Known Member
Messages
746
Came across some Dack's 150th anniversary PTB's in water bison from 1984. Tan and black. Dack's were part of the Canadian trifecta of GYW shoemakers along with Hartt and McHale. Me Da had 3 pairs of dress shoes. One blucher from each maker. Dack's were Cheaney/Church's quality shoes. $80 for both including shipping. Started thinking like a shoo scientist.

View attachment 41099

Started with the tan pair.
View attachment 41089

View attachment 41090
Figured I'd strip them, re-dye them, smooth out the creases, put in new sock liners and have my cobbler resole them.

Washed them with saddle soap. Stripped them with Fiebings deglazer, which is an acetone-based product.

View attachment 41093

Dyed them with Fiebings oxblood. Nicest and truest oxblood that I can get my hands on. Vass won't sell me or tell me who makes their oxblood dye, which is the nicest, even browner oxblood out there, but horses for courses & YMMV.

It is rather red prior to being applied. Leap of faith red. Glove broke.

View attachment 41098

But the end result is a nice dark oxblood with subtle red and no purple. Did not cut it and used it straight. Did not paintbrush on thin coats. Used a wool dauber and just did continuous uniform coats until I hit on the depth of colour I wanted. Let dry overnight and re-assessed. Decided not to do more coats
View attachment 41094

Saphir Renovateur then their Hermes Red paste. Closest Saphir has to oxblood and it just deepens the red a bit without adding burgundy hues. I like the way it turned out.

View attachment 41095
View attachment 41096

JR Rendenbach leather soles then rubber half sole. Cobbler built a new heel stack and finished with full rubber top cap and they are now Saskatchewan 4-season shoes without having to opt for lug soles. Softer rubber compound and better for snow and ice compared to the harder rubber compounds like Dainite. Same for snow tires. He uses pre-formed cork versus the hot cork goo. No gemming failure The Shooman The Shooman .

View attachment 41097

The black pair are at the cobbler's and I am picking them up tomorrow. He was replacing the welt when I popped in to get the polish. It's always cool to see a cobbler welting shoes and this guy is a whacky 6' 6" beanpole of an old hippie in a denim flat cap and he has the wingspan of Michael Gross. His shop is tiny and and narrow so he has to angle himself to be able to fully stick out his arms

The Shooman The Shooman , no gemming failure in the black pair either but the welt needed re-doing since there had been enough re-soles to perforate it so it should not be used again.
Fantastic work. Wear them carefully and make them a Canadian family heirloom.

In the 60s, I inherited wonderful double- soled brogues and cap-toes which must have been early 20th century. I wore them a lot. But, sadly, I just saw them as old shoes in the end and they went the way of all trash.
 

florisgreen

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,543
Came across some Dack's 150th anniversary PTB's in water bison from 1984. Tan and black. Dack's were part of the Canadian trifecta of GYW shoemakers along with Hartt and McHale. Me Da had 3 pairs of dress shoes. One blucher from each maker. Dack's were Cheaney/Church's quality shoes. $80 for both including shipping. Started thinking like a shoo scientist.

View attachment 41099

Started with the tan pair.
View attachment 41089

View attachment 41090
Figured I'd strip them, re-dye them, smooth out the creases, put in new sock liners and have my cobbler resole them.

Washed them with saddle soap. Stripped them with Fiebings deglazer, which is an acetone-based product.

View attachment 41093

Dyed them with Fiebings oxblood. Nicest and truest oxblood that I can get my hands on. Vass won't sell me or tell me who makes their oxblood dye, which is the nicest, even browner oxblood out there, but horses for courses & YMMV.

It is rather red prior to being applied. Leap of faith red. Glove broke.

View attachment 41098

But the end result is a nice dark oxblood with subtle red and no purple. Did not cut it and used it straight. Did not paintbrush on thin coats. Used a wool dauber and just did continuous uniform coats until I hit on the depth of colour I wanted. Let dry overnight and re-assessed. Decided not to do more coats
View attachment 41094

Saphir Renovateur then their Hermes Red paste. Closest Saphir has to oxblood and it just deepens the red a bit without adding burgundy hues. I like the way it turned out.

View attachment 41095
View attachment 41096

JR Rendenbach leather soles then rubber half sole. Cobbler built a new heel stack and finished with full rubber top cap and they are now Saskatchewan 4-season shoes without having to opt for lug soles. Softer rubber compound and better for snow and ice compared to the harder rubber compounds like Dainite. Same for snow tires. He uses pre-formed cork versus the hot cork goo. No gemming failure The Shooman The Shooman .

View attachment 41097

The black pair are at the cobbler's and I am picking them up tomorrow. He was replacing the welt when I popped in to get the polish. It's always cool to see a cobbler welting shoes and this guy is a whacky 6' 6" beanpole of an old hippie in a denim flat cap and he has the wingspan of Michael Gross. His shop is tiny and and narrow so he has to angle himself to be able to fully stick out his arms

The Shooman The Shooman , no gemming failure in the black pair either but the welt needed re-doing since there had been enough re-soles to perforate it so it should not be used again.

Great job on venerable shoes. The final result is stunning. I like that leather, a pity not to see it more often.
 

Kingstonian

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2,722
Great job on venerable shoes. The final result is stunning. I like that leather, a pity not to see it more often.
Indeed. As interesting for the Canadian aspect as for the shoes themselves.

The four season Saskatchewan is interesting. Is it a Redenbach sole with soft rubber on top, or half Redenbach half soft rubber?

I thought Canadians might use Winter boots in grim weather and then change into shoes indoors.
 

Thruth

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Indeed. As interesting for the Canadian aspect as for the shoes themselves.

The four season Saskatchewan is interesting. Is it a Redenbach sole with soft rubber on top, or half Redenbach half soft rubber?

I thought Canadians might use Winter boots in grim weather and then change into shoes indoors.
Full leather with rubber. Topy just not Topy brand.

I have meetings in various sites on campus and in around the downtown office so changing in and out of boots is not something that I will do or wear toe rubbers.
 
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