Cop Tyranny Thread

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Messages
27,584
Ratings
13,742
Solution? Stay home. It's less hassle than this crap. don't give those shit companies your money until they stop overselling flights.
this is actually a matter of corporate tyranny. the FAA rules actually say, in plain language that having the kid in the car seat is better than on the lap. and, in fact, so does Delta's...

https://www.delta.com/content/www/en_US/traveling-with-us/special-travel-needs/children.html#

https://faa.custhelp.com/app/answer...sion/L3RpbWUvMTQ5MzkwNDU2NS9zaWQvT3VxS0pKaG4=
 

LelandJ

Chicken Testicle Enthusiast
Messages
6,025
Ratings
2,947
The rep said "we/you can sit there all night but the plane won't move". They should've sat there until the thugs came to beat them out and cash in again.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Messages
27,584
Ratings
13,742
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2017/07/17/the-weekend-in-police-shootings/

The weekend in police shootings




By Radley Balko July 17 at 5:45 PM
First, from Minnesota:

Justine Damond called police late Saturday night to report what she thought was a sexual assault occurring near the home she shared with her fiancé. But shortly after two officers arrived in her upscale Minneapolis neighborhood to investigate, the call turned deadly when one of the officers shot Damond.

It is unclear why the officer opened fire on Damond, a 40-year-old yoga and meditation teacher from Australia who was supposed to wed next month, and her death immediately drew renewed scrutiny of police officers in the Twin Cities area for their use of deadly force — and questions from her relatives and others in the community . . .

Her fiance, Don Damond, said Monday that she was reporting “what she believed was an active sexual assault occurring nearby.”

What happened next remained a mystery on Monday. Neither of the responding officers had turned on their body cameras, and police have not yet said why one of the officers shot her. The squad car camera did not capture the incident, either.

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA), the state agency investigating the shooting, has said only that “at one point,” one of the officers fired a weapon and struck Justine Damond. No weapons were found at the scene.


From what I can tell, this is the Minneapolis policy on police body cameras:

Under the new plan, sworn officers would be required to turn on the devices during all traffic and suspicious-person stops, car chases and searches, in addition to any use of force.

One would think that they’d be required to turn them on while investigating a report of a sexual assault, but it doesn’t neatly fit into any of those categories. (They did of course use force, but the circumstances of how and why aren’t clear.) In any case, from what we know now, this one looks bad.

The Massachusetts case is another sad tale of what happens when police respond to a mental-health crisis.

As police cars rolled into his pristine suburban neighborhood last Saturday night, past the sprawling Colonials and manicured lawns, and as dozens of officers from across the region surrounded his home, Russell Reeves begged them again and again to back off.

In a bedroom upstairs his son Austin, 26, was distraught over a breakup. He had told his family he needed time alone. With him was his dog and his 9 mm handgun. If you pressure him, if he feels cornered, Reeves said he told the police, this will end with Austin killing himself.

The police listened and nodded and took notes in their notebooks, according to Reeves. And yet, more officers kept coming. Some wore camouflage and carried rifles. They set up bright lights to shine onto the house and drove a military-style vehicle into the backyard. Eventually, they broke seven upstairs windows so a mounted camera could look inside for Austin.

You know how it ends — just as the man’s father predicted. I’ll never understand why anyone would think it’s appropriate to send a SWAT team for someone who is suicidal, much less a SWAT team and a small army of area police officers. The unfortunate lesson from these suicide stories is that if you have a loved one in crisis, call a psychiatrist. Call a suicide prevention hotline. Call a counselor or a minister. But don’t call the police. We really shouldn’t be surprised when the people we mostly pay to detain, arrest and kill turn out to be inept at talking someone down from an emotional breakdown.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Messages
27,584
Ratings
13,742
In that Minneapolis case, the cop that killed the Australian woman is a Somali (and almost certainly a Muslim). Y'don't suppose that this could be some sort of hate crime?
If I read the reporting correctly he shot her through the car door while sitting in the passenger seat. You have to think it's something more than being startled, don't you?
 

Jan Libourel

Well-Known Member
Messages
608
Ratings
588
According to the latest I've heard in the Minneapolis case, the cops heard a "loud noise" before the Somali shot her. It just seems to me that there are a lot more cowardly, trigger-happy cops these days. I can't help wondering if the widespread use of Glock pistols, with their short, light trigger pulls, doesn't exacerbate the problem.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Messages
27,584
Ratings
13,742
According to the latest I've heard in the Minneapolis case, the cops heard a "loud noise" before the Somali shot her. It just seems to me that there are a lot more cowardly, trigger-happy cops these days. I can't help wondering if the widespread use of Glock pistols, with their short, light trigger pulls, doesn't exacerbate the problem.
heard a noise? she called in for the cops and probably came outside to meet them. what did she do, tap on the window?
 

Lord Buckley

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,940
Ratings
966

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
Moderator
Messages
19,051
Ratings
23,904

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
2,937
Ratings
3,180
It just seems to me that there are a lot more cowardly, trigger-happy cops these days.
Absolutely - it certainly seems that many more police are prepared to shoot first and ask questions later.

Is this perhaps because of the ready and wide availability of firearms in the US, and the apparent willingness of people to use them? Police are pre-emptively acting in defence, in the expectation that they may be attacked?

It also perhaps points to a lack of effective training - poor risk assessment, poor conflict management/resolution, poor overall judgement.
 

Lord Buckley

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,940
Ratings
966
Absolutely - it certainly seems that many more police are prepared to shoot first and ask questions later.

Is this perhaps because of the ready and wide availability of firearms in the US, and the apparent willingness of people to use them? Police are pre-emptively acting in defence, in the expectation that they may be attacked?

It also perhaps points to a lack of effective training - poor risk assessment, poor conflict management/resolution, poor overall judgement.
In the US you do have more dangerous gangs and drug crazed meatamphetamine heads than the rest of the Western world. So the police need guns. In Brazil when they have shoot out it's often with machine guns and inevitably people get killed in the cross fire. Compared to Brazilain police tactics, the US response is measured.

Of course if you happen to be a female in pyjamas....

TC-police-easily-startled.jpg
 

LelandJ

Chicken Testicle Enthusiast
Messages
6,025
Ratings
2,947
Absolutely - it certainly seems that many more police are prepared to shoot first and ask questions later.

Is this perhaps because of the ready and wide availability of firearms in the US, and the apparent willingness of people to use them? Police are pre-emptively acting in defence, in the expectation that they may be attacked?

It also perhaps points to a lack of effective training - poor risk assessment, poor conflict management/resolution, poor overall judgement.
Contrary cops are trained to be thugs. Fascism isn't incompetence.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
1,692
Ratings
2,766
For those who may not be aware, the police have very good personal reasons for pulling you up and fining you. They have quotas to get! Police have openly admitted that too. This link here goes into all the dirty secrets the police keep from the public, and it includes many complaints against the police being shredded so the higher ups don't find out.




It costs too much money to hunt down robbers and violent people, and the payoff is not guaranteed. More money can be made by fining people slightly over the speed limit.

Police being told to make the public do wrong things in order to fill the quotas. I believe this because l was in the car the other day when a large 4WD completely stopped IN a roundabout and waved me through. I strongly suspected it was an undercover cop trying to get me to do the wrong thing and go through, but l refused to drive through until he had driven through.
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
2,937
Ratings
3,180
^That's not only tragic, but very bizarre, too.

The officer went to the wrong apartment - apparently on the wrong floor, too - tried to open the lock but couldn't, the person who lived there opened the door to see what was happening and, shortly afterwards, the officer shot him.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Messages
27,584
Ratings
13,742
^That's not only tragic, but very bizarre, too.

The officer went to the wrong apartment - apparently on the wrong floor, too - tried to open the lock but couldn't, the person who lived there opened the door to see what was happening and, shortly afterwards, the officer shot him.
Yes
 

LelandJ

Chicken Testicle Enthusiast
Messages
6,025
Ratings
2,947
^That's not only tragic, but very bizarre, too.

The officer went to the wrong apartment - apparently on the wrong floor, too - tried to open the lock but couldn't, the person who lived there opened the door to see what was happening and, shortly afterwards, the officer shot him.
What's really bizarre is you taking police statements and media at face value.

The only question should be why was a hit put out on him.
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
2,937
Ratings
3,180
What's really bizarre is you taking police statements and media at face value.

The only question should be why was a hit put out on him.
Off-topic, but I'm frequently amazed at how conspiracy theorists *always* choose options that are more unlikely than what actually seems to have happened.

*If* a hit was put out on this person, don't you think the situation would be framed as "valiant police officer shoots burglar in apartment" or some such thing? Instead of the current reporting, which is "foolish/drunk police officer makes massive mistake in going to wrong floor and wrong apartment and then makes even bigger mistake by shooting resident"?
 
Top Bottom