General fitness

Jan Libourel

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This afternoon I visited the little gym where I have a fortnightly private training session with the proprietor. He had acquired some new equipment, to wit, an Indian gada mace (about which I had inquired in an earlier post in this thread) and also a couple of Bulgarian bags, a device very new to me. I tried both. While they may have their merits for certain exercises, I don't believe I shall acquire either for my home gym.
 

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This afternoon I visited the little gym where I have a fortnightly private training session with the proprietor. He had acquired some new equipment, to wit, an Indian gada mace (about which I had inquired in an earlier post in this thread) and also a couple of Bulgarian bags, a device very new to me. I tried both. While they may have their merits for certain exercises, I don't believe I shall acquire either for my home gym.
why didn't you like the mace?
 

Jan Libourel

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It's not a question of "disliking" the mace. It's good for tire pounding, but that can already be done with sledgehammers, which I have. You can twirl it around your head, but I can do kettlebell "haloes" with more weight. Most of the other mace exercises--"spear thrust," "gravedigger," sundry presses, squats and curls all strike me as sort of makeshift, things that can be performed about as well or better with free weights, kettlebells or a sledgehammer, for that matter. If I had no other exercise equipment, I could no doubt derive some benefit from the gada, but that is hardly my situation. Much the same is true of the Bulgarian bag: The primary exercises I can duplicate pretty well with my heaviest Indian clubs.
 

Jan Libourel

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For some simple, basic exercises, you might check out the video on The Art of Manliness website. There are jillion Indian club exercises and workouts on the net, but I suggest you don't try anything too fancy at first, and the referenced video is a good starting point.

For the actual clubs, I recommend those offered by Richard "Army" Maguire at agelesstrength.com. They seem to offer an excellent quality/price/value ratio. All my clubs come from him. Since it sounds as if you are already working out, I suggest starting with a pair of 2-pound clubs.

There are a number of 19th century books available on Indian club swinging, but I find most of the diagrams in them horribly complex. I'm damned if I can make much sense of most of them, and at least at one time I was accounted a fairly bright guy.
 
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For some simple, basic exercises, you might check out the video on The Art of Manliness website. There are jillion Indian club exercises and workouts on the net, but I suggest you don't try anything too fancy at first, and the referenced video is a good starting point.

For the actual clubs, I recommend those offered by Richard "Army" Maguire at agelesstrength.com. They seem to offer an excellent quality/price/value ratio. All my clubs come from him. Since it sounds as if you are already working out, I suggest starting with a pair of 2-pound clubs.

There are a number of 19th century books available on Indian club swinging, but I find most of the diagrams in them horribly complex. I'm damned if I can make much sense of most of them, and at least at one time I was accounted a fairly bright guy.
Excellent, thank you! I did find a couple of books, but I couldn't make head nor tail of them.
 

Jan Libourel

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Visited the gym where I train after a hiatus of three weeks. The proprietor had gotten two additional gada maces, raising his total to three in seven, 10 and 15-pound weights. I pounded a tire with the 15-pounder and also with my 16-pound sledgehammer, which I had stored for use at the gym. Curiously, the 15-pound gada seemed much more dynamic handling than the sledgehammer, more than the one-pound difference would indicate. I believe the difference comes from the fact that weight of the sledgehammer is concentrated more in the head, while the gada has a thick steel handle that distributes the weight more evenly. Aside from pounding, I still find the gada to be of very finite utility.

Additionally, I did some swinging with a pair of 10-pound clubbells. I was left feeling they didn't offer much that I didn't get from my heaviest Indian clubs. They also had a sort of "dead" feeling--much less dynamic than the wooden clubs.

I also used slamballs for the first time. I picked up a 90-pounder and carried it around the gym several times. It was challenging and fun and practically a workout in itself. I also had fun picking up a 50-pounder overhead and slamming it across the gym floor. I might be tempted to acquire a few, but for the fact they are fairly pricey, and I know the tyrannical termagant would give me hell over the space they took up!
 
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Jan Libourel

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Functional Strength? Can anyone here give me a good, succinct definition of "functional strength"? I heard it and the term "functional strength movement," tried to find online definitions, but I remain unclear.

On another note, I have just resumed tire bashing with a sledgehammer. After having used one, I do find the gada mace a slightly preferable tool for the job--better balanced, more dynamic handling. Since a gada costs very little more than a sledgehammer of equivalent weight, I now think it may be the better choice. (On reflection, you can get a sledgehammer at your local hardware store, whereas shipping costs on the gada may run up costs more.) For some reason, the sledgehammer just somehow seems more "manly" to me. Why John Henry should seem more manly than an ancient Hindustani warrior, I can't really explain. As I have previously mentioned, I have been unimpressed by the exercises suggested for the gada or sledgehammer other than pounding.

I have been using a large SUV tire that my stepson gave me for a target. This is somewhat smaller than optimal according to most authorities. I have been thinking of sawing it in half and using a raised half (resting on the sawed-off ends) for a target--lighter and handier, considerably broader target area and less damage to the lawn. I know some people do this, Has anybody here tried this?
 

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Jan Libourel Jan Libourel the short version would be a distinction between how much weight you could lift vs. what you could lift in real life. For instance, if you have big bulging biceps and shoulders but couldnt haul sacks of wheat because your forearm and grip strength kept giving out.
 

Jan Libourel

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^But realistically, wouldn't any man who had developed "big bulging biceps and shoulders" have also gained a reasonable amount of forearm and grip strength in doing so, even though such an individual might have less strength in these areas than a less imposing man who had been hauling the hypothetical sacks of wheat?
 

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^But realistically, wouldn't any man who had developed "big bulging biceps and shoulders" have also gained a reasonable amount of forearm and grip strength in doing so, even though such an individual might have less strength in these areas than a less imposing man who had been hauling the hypothetical sacks of wheat?
yes in theory but especially with the "bodybuilder" types, you find a lot of guy who have huge muscles but aren't built for physical labor. one of the reasons the powerlifters don't care about how they look is because they only care about how much weight they can move. you see a lot of those guys with big bellies but those bellies are generally pretty solid and they've got forearms the size of tree trunks.
 

Jan Libourel

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Oh, don't get me started on bodybuilding, especially in recent years. With its emphasis on "pump" and the extensive use of steroids, it was nothing I'd have wanted to get involved with, even if I'd had more potential, years back. At least in my younger days, most of the top men like Reg Park or Bill Pearl looked like strong, healthy men, and except when they had trained down for competition, they didn't look like living anatomy charts. None of them had "bubble guts" either. I can recall Bill Pearl saying that if you go to a bodybuilding competition, very probably the least healthy man in the whole auditorium will be the guy standing on the winner's dais, and that was many years ago. These days, the top men all look grotesque and monstrous, not at all aesthetically pleasing, and a lot of them, I gather, go down to early graves.

With all that out of the way, I still believe that any man who can develop a competition-quality physique is going to be vastly stronger than the vast majority of untrained men. However, size can be very deceiving, nor is there by any means a direct correlation between size and strength. I can recall going to a powerlifting competition as a spectator. I was training hard in those days and weighed about 230 at a height of 6'3", so I didn't feel particularly overawed among that host of massive men. Among all these burly brutes I espied a tiny, skinny little man who looked very out of place. "What the hell is he doing here," thought I. Then I realized who he was: the flyweight powerlifting champion of the world. At half my weight, he was about my equal in strength! It was a good lesson in humility for me.

I saw on one website the other day that Steve Reeves in his prime only trained six hours a week--three two-hour total body workouts. Joe Weider once observed that Reeves never came close to realizing his potential. I still would have liked to have looked more like Reeves than most later physique stars. An interesting fact about Reeves is that shortly before he retired from acting, he turned down two roles: James Bond in Dr. No and The Man with No Name in A Fistful of Dollars. I have to wonder how he felt about that afterward. However, he seems to have enjoyed a long, comfortable retirement and had a good life.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Among all these burly brutes I espied a tiny, skinny little man who looked very out of place. "What the hell is he doing here," thought I. Then I realized who he was: the flyweight powerlifting champion of the world. At half my weight, he was about my equal in strength! It was a good lesson in humility for me.
The same can be said for flyweight and bantamweight boxers.

I saw on one website the other day that Steve Reeves in his prime only trained six hours a week--three two-hour total body workouts.
Sounds about right to me. The overtrained steroid heads are muscle bound and pumping themselves up to an early grave.
 

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After working on upper body muscle and definition for the last few years, I’m transitioning to cardio and a more balanced routine - less heavy weight muscle building and more rowing and stair climbing. With the exception of a focus on abs building. Time to admit I’m pushing 50 and think more about general health then just looking ripped.
 

Jan Libourel

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We had dinner Friday night with my wife's brother and his spouse. He and his wife do yoga and a bit of walking but not much else in the way of exercise. I was mentioning my regimen with Indian clubs, kettlebells, sledgehammers and medicine balls. My brother in law made the sagacious observation that it all sounded like what you might find in a 1920s gym. I suppose he's right. Truly, "that which was old has become new again."

On the subject old-time methods, I decided to go ahead and take advantage of Black Friday to order two gada maces from Onnit--a 10- and a 15-pounder. After I've trained with them for awhile, I'll discuss their merits, real or fancied, here.
 

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We had dinner Friday night with my wife's brother and his spouse. He and his wife do yoga and a bit of walking but not much else in the way of exercise. I was mentioning my regimen with Indian clubs, kettlebells, sledgehammers and medicine balls. My brother in law made the sagacious observation that it all sounded like what you might find in a 1920s gym. I suppose he's right. Truly, "that which was old has become new again."

On the subject old-time methods, I decided to go ahead and take advantage of Black Friday to order two gada maces from Onnit--a 10- and a 15-pounder. After I've trained with them for awhile, I'll discuss their merits, real or fancied, here.
Looking forward to your review
 

Dropbear

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I keep reading that sit-ups are bad and I should be doing something other than the steep incline sit up bench for abs. But every alternative suggestion is some low resistance planking nonsense. I get that from rowing and swimming. I want something for ab muscle bulking if I’m going to ditch sit-ups!!
 
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I sprained my knee hiking in the summer and now I'm having a really difficult time getting motivated after taking some time to recover. I'm swimming at the Y, little bit of weightlifting and rowing, but just can't seem to get back into a good routine. Quite depressing.
 

Jan Libourel

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I've heard that business about sit-ups being bad, but I did an awful lot of them in my day. At one point I could do about a dozen reps with a 70-pound dumbbell behind my head and three or four reps with an 85-pounder. Never had any injury or other ill effects that I can remember. These days I incorporate sit-ups in my abs workouts. I am using an 18-pound medicine ball held at arm's length behind my head as I lie supine and go all the way over.
 

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I sprained my knee hiking in the summer and now I'm having a really difficult time getting motivated after taking some time to recover. I'm swimming at the Y, little bit of weightlifting and rowing, but just can't seem to get back into a good routine. Quite depressing.
you set any goals for yourself? try changing up your routine?

I've heard that business about sit-ups being bad, but I did an awful lot of them in my day. At one point I could do about a dozen reps with a 70-pound dumbbell behind my head and three or four reps with an 85-pounder. Never had any injury or other ill effects that I can remember. These days I incorporate sit-ups in my abs workouts. I am using an 18-pound medicine ball held at arm's length behind my head as I lie supine and go all the way over.
most of the warning comes from people fucking up their necks and backs with improper form. if you do them properly then its really not the end of the world.
 
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I am starting on Madcow 5x5, previously doing 5/3/1. Previously on my off days I would row or run, now I swim.
I currently have no well-defined goal. Just being a bit of a pussy, really. Lots of excuses, little backbone.
 

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I am starting on Madcow 5x5, previously doing 5/3/1. Previously on my off days I would row or run, now I swim.
I currently have no well-defined goal. Just being a bit of a pussy, really. Lots of excuses, little backbone.
We've all been there. Set some lifting goals. Theyre easy targets to try and hit
 

Dropbear

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most of the warning comes from people fucking up their necks and backs with improper form. if you do them properly then its really not the end of the world.
My gym took away all the sit-up equipment - I really liked the incline bench. I'm trying to adapt to The Captain's Chair, but I'm still looking for something to match the resistance of incline sit-ups. What ab equipment do you recommend?
 
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Well, I decided I've had enough slacking. I set up my Concept2 in the studio near my computer and have started a good program using Row Pro, which brings a nice interaction to the workout. I'm also going back to a Madcow 5x5 weightlifting program.

I row (boats) during the warm seasons and swim indoors in the cold, so this is not a stretch. 8k today, feels great! I don't know why I would let myself stop. I'm a much nicer person when fit.
 

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Rambo Rambo : please explain this Keto thing to me. Is it all about percentages or is portion control still a factor? Does it distinguish between different types of fats? How can I go so long without shitting when all I’m eating is fat and protein??
 

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Rambo Rambo : please explain this Keto thing to me. Is it all about percentages or is portion control still a factor? Does it distinguish between different types of fats? How can I go so long without shitting when all I’m eating is fat and protein??
the basic gist is that you use fat as a source for fuel. without carbs coming into your body you have to maintain a certain level of caloric intake for energy and the fat accomplishes that, but because you're using the fat as a fuel source, your body isn't storing it.

the key to the diet is ratios. you can use sites like these to help you get an idea of where you should be at:

https://keto-calculator.ankerl.com/

https://ketogains.com/wp-content/ca...s.com//ketogains-calculator//_index.html_gzip

you want to be roughly 75% fat, 20-25% protein, less than 25g a day of total carbs.

you shit pretty good with all the fat greasing up the wheels.
 

Dropbear

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Not even sure why I’m doing this, but I guess I could lose a couple of pounds to show off my abs - if I was going somewhere to show them off. First weight loss diet I’ve ever been on. Anyway, I’m doing this Keto thing full-on now. I think it appeals to my monastic, puritanic, spartan, self-denial nature. The one exception is red wine. And I seem to be drinking more, to make up for the food I’m not eating.
 

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Not even sure why I’m doing this, but I guess I could lose a couple of pounds to show off my abs - if I was going somewhere to show them off. First weight loss diet I’ve ever been on. Anyway, I’m doing this Keto thing full-on now. I think it appeals to my monastic, puritanic, spartan, self-denial nature. The one exception is red wine. And I seem to be drinking more, to make up for the food I’m not eating.
careful. red wine has carbs.

its really more of a lifestyle than a diet, especially for the people who need it.
 

Jan Libourel

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I keep reading that sit-ups are bad and I should be doing something other than the steep incline sit up bench for abs. But every alternative suggestion is some low resistance planking nonsense. I get that from rowing and swimming. I want something for ab muscle bulking if I’m going to ditch sit-ups!!
How about weighted crunches? I do a them with a 36- or 40-pound kettlebell (I'm sure you could probably utilize more weight), and they are an essential part of my abs workout. They are supposed to work the abs more directly than sit-ups.
 

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Thanks. I’m doing weighted crunches now! It still doesn’t feel lthe same as a true sit-up for working all the abdominals, but I’m willing to trust that with the added resistance it will have a similar result. I can’t add more weight without feeling sore in a muscle right below my shoulder in the back.

Currently, I’m doing 3x75 crunches with 85lbs and then 3x25 captain’s chair knee lifts to focus on lower abs. Those are hard - though I’m feeling them more in the back than abs. Then, whatever ab benefit that comes with 30 minutes of rowing.
 

Jan Libourel

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Mace Review: As Rambo requested when I mentioned ordering 10- and 15-pound Indian maces, here is a review after training with them for a month. As it turns out, I am pleased I ordered them. In practice, they are a leverage bell. (Some people call them "macebells.") The basic mace exercise involves raising the mace over your head and shoulder and swinging it behind your back and bringing it up over the opposite shoulder. There are two similar variants known as the 360 and the 10-2. (These moves are illustrated in any number of YouTube videos.) This is an excellent way to work your shoulders, upper back and core, but even more your forearms and grip. The further down the handle you grip the mace, the more challenging the exercise. I can now do the classic moves with some fluidity and perform a reasonable number of swings with the 10-pounder gripping it near the bottom of the handle. The 15-pounder is still very ponderous unless I grip it close to the head, where the move becomes similar to a kettlebell halo. I note that I am finding kettlebell haloes much easier since I started training with the mace.

As for other suggested exercises with the mace, I don't find them very challenging with the 15-pounder. Perhaps with a heavier mace and high reps they may be more beneficial.

When it comes to tire-bashing, I am definitely going to stick with sledgehammers. The smooth, narrower handle of the sledge seems preferable to the thick, lightly knurled handle of the Onnit maces. For performing diagonal blows on the tire, there's not much practical difference between the mace and the sledgehammer. However, when pounding the tire with overhead blows (as if driving a stake), the longer handle of the mace wants to punch me in the groin area, which obviously I don't want it to do.

In summary, the maces strike me as worthwhile additions to my home gym, providing me with new challenges and variety in training. They are not very expensive and take up little room. Would I want the mace as my sole piece of fitness equipment or make it the centerpiece of my training regimen? No. Am I glad I got the maces? Yes.

I note that some proponents of the mace claim that when Alexander the Great's army reached India, they found the Indian warriors bigger and stronger than any men they had previously faced, presumably because of their mace training. I studied the campaigns of Alexander pretty extensively in graduate school, and I didn't remember any such thing. Our four major sources on Alexander are Arrian, Plutarch, Quintus Curtius Rufus and Diodorus Siculus. I re-read the accounts of these authors on Alexander's Indian campaigns, and there was nothing of that sort in there...but perhaps it does appear in some other ancient author. The only mention of the Indians' physiques I could find was in Arrian's Indica where he says that the Indians in general were on the skinny side.

On a final note, I have been pronouncing the Indian term for the mace "gah-dah." We recently had a Punjabi visitor who pronounced it "g'duh"...if that's of any interest.
 

Jan Libourel

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A Sledgehammer Tip: As long as I am expounding at some length about fitness topics, I thought I'd toss this in: I think my very favorite exercise of all those I do is tire bashing with a sledgehammer. Until recently, though, there were several impediments to my doing this, mostly in relation to our lawn. If I hit the tire a glancing blow, the hammer would gouge huge divots in the lawn that would have to be refilled and re-seeded. Even if I kept all my hits on the tire, it pounded down the grass so that the result looked like a miniature crop circle. When our lawn was in poor shape, this didn't matter too much, but recently we have been making reasonably successful efforts to restore the lawn. To avoid damage to the lawn, I hit upon this expedient: I purchased a 4-foot square of 3/4-inch plywood and keep the tire (a good-sized SUV tire) centered in it. This disperses the impact over so large an area that little to no harm is done to the lawn, and I find my glancing blows barely dent the thick plywood. Anyway, if you want to try sledgehammer training yet protect your lawn, this has worked very well for me, and it should for you too.
 

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A Sledgehammer Tip: As long as I am expounding at some length about fitness topics, I thought I'd toss this in: I think my very favorite exercise of all those I do is tire bashing with a sledgehammer. Until recently, though, there were several impediments to my doing this, mostly in relation to our lawn. If I hit the tire a glancing blow, the hammer would gouge huge divots in the lawn that would have to be refilled and re-seeded. Even if I kept all my hits on the tire, it pounded down the grass so that the result looked like a miniature crop circle. When our lawn was in poor shape, this didn't matter too much, but recently we have been making reasonably successful efforts to restore the lawn. To avoid damage to the lawn, I hit upon this expedient: I purchased a 4-foot square of 3/4-inch plywood and keep the tire (a good-sized SUV tire) centered in it. This disperses the impact over so large an area that little to no harm is done to the lawn, and I find my glancing blows barely dent the thick plywood. Anyway, if you want to try sledgehammer training yet protect your lawn, this has worked very well for me, and it should for you too.
are you keeping the tire outside all the time or are you lugging this in and out of your garage every time you want to use it? i'd love to do this but i lack the space and lawn to accommodate it.

Mace Review: As Rambo requested when I mentioned ordering 10- and 15-pound Indian maces, here is a review after training with them for a month. As it turns out, I am pleased I ordered them. In practice, they are a leverage bell. (Some people call them "macebells.") The basic mace exercise involves raising the mace over your head and shoulder and swinging it behind your back and bringing it up over the opposite shoulder. There are two similar variants known as the 360 and the 10-2. (These moves are illustrated in any number of YouTube videos.) This is an excellent way to work your shoulders, upper back and core, but even more your forearms and grip. The further down the handle you grip the mace, the more challenging the exercise. I can now do the classic moves with some fluidity and perform a reasonable number of swings with the 10-pounder gripping it near the bottom of the handle. The 15-pounder is still very ponderous unless I grip it close to the head, where the move becomes similar to a kettlebell halo. I note that I am finding kettlebell haloes much easier since I started training with the mace.

As for other suggested exercises with the mace, I don't find them very challenging with the 15-pounder. Perhaps with a heavier mace and high reps they may be more beneficial.

When it comes to tire-bashing, I am definitely going to stick with sledgehammers. The smooth, narrower handle of the sledge seems preferable to the thick, lightly knurled handle of the Onnit maces. For performing diagonal blows on the tire, there's not much practical difference between the mace and the sledgehammer. However, when pounding the tire with overhead blows (as if driving a stake), the longer handle of the mace wants to punch me in the groin area, which obviously I don't want it to do.

In summary, the maces strike me as worthwhile additions to my home gym, providing me with new challenges and variety in training. They are not very expensive and take up little room. Would I want the mace as my sole piece of fitness equipment or make it the centerpiece of my training regimen? No. Am I glad I got the maces? Yes.

I note that some proponents of the mace claim that when Alexander the Great's army reached India, they found the Indian warriors bigger and stronger than any men they had previously faced, presumably because of their mace training. I studied the campaigns of Alexander pretty extensively in graduate school, and I didn't remember any such thing. Our four major sources on Alexander are Arrian, Plutarch, Quintus Curtius Rufus and Diodorus Siculus. I re-read the accounts of these authors on Alexander's Indian campaigns, and there was nothing of that sort in there...but perhaps it does appear in some other ancient author. The only mention of the Indians' physiques I could find was in Arrian's Indica where he says that the Indians in general were on the skinny side.

On a final note, I have been pronouncing the Indian term for the mace "gah-dah." We recently had a Punjabi visitor who pronounced it "g'duh"...if that's of any interest.
thank you very much for sharing your review.

i had an old school guy here locally you would have gotten along with like gangbusters tell me about indian clubs a long time ago. he would go to the park and push sleds and use a sledge and use the clubs. for people with homes and garages and SUV's this seems like a dream come true. its a shame more corporate gym's don't stock these alternative tools.
 

Jan Libourel

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are you keeping the tire outside all the time or are you lugging this in and out of your garage every time you want to use it? i'd love to do this but i lack the space and lawn to accommodate it.

thank you very much for sharing your review.
I keep the tire behind our garage, where it is inconspicuous and roll it out when I want to use it. I note that there are some hammer or mace devices with polymer heads that can be used for pounding exercises on concrete and whatnot, but they are quite expensive and I have no experience with them. I am not sure what dedicated exercise hammers bring to the party that the kind you buy from the hardware store don't.

i had an old school guy here locally you would have gotten along with like gangbusters tell me about indian clubs a long time ago. he would go to the park and push sleds and use a sledge and use the clubs. for people with homes and garages and SUV's this seems like a dream come true. its a shame more corporate gym's don't stock these alternative tools.
I don't know if I consciously consider myself "old school" in matters of fitness and training. I really just got bored with doing the same old free weight exercises that I had been doing on-and-off for the previous half century. The fact that I could perform them with only a fraction of the poundages I employed in my lusty prime 40-odd years ago was also dismaying. It just seems that a lot of these "alternative fitness" modes that interested me are quite retro, e.g., Indian clubs and kettlebells. Can maces be considered "old school"? I don't think anybody in the West employed them until very recently.
 

Jan Libourel

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Thanks. I’m doing weighted crunches now! It still doesn’t feel lthe same as a true sit-up for working all the abdominals, but I’m willing to trust that with the added resistance it will have a similar result. I can’t add more weight without feeling sore in a muscle right below my shoulder in the back.

Currently, I’m doing 3x75 crunches with 85lbs and then 3x25 captain’s chair knee lifts to focus on lower abs. Those are hard - though I’m feeling them more in the back than abs. Then, whatever ab benefit that comes with 30 minutes of rowing.
Three sets of 75 crunches while holding an 85-pound weight above your chest and abdomen? Did your parents find you as a baby in a space capsule or what? If dropbears were real, Dropbear, and one dropped on you, you could doubtless tear the nasty critter apart with your bare hands!
 

Jan Libourel

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Had some ups and downs in my fitness regimen lately. I had worked up to a pretty intense combined kettlebell and dumbbell workout on my heavy days. However, first I was derailed in this by lacerating my left hand in a fall--gouged it on a rock when I took a spill on a muddy trail. Oddly enough, I could swing the maces without any discomfort. Soon after resuming my heavy workout, I began to be bothered by a trace of tendinopathy in my left forearm. I believe power cleans with the dumbbells may have been the principal culprit, or it may have simply been a case of overuse. I had hoped to train through it by jettisoning the DB exercises and going to lighter weights and higher reps with the KBs and Indian clubs, but this didn't work, and the pain only increased. For the moment, then, I am relegated to using my wife's elliptical machine and doing some high repetition exercises with my medicine balls. This worked for me a couple of years ago, and I am hopeful I'll be hitting the iron in a few weeks at most. It's very nice to have a variety of training resources in your home gym
 
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