Good Articles That Don't Deserve Their Own Threads

Fwiffo

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Lehman anniversary: The five most surprising consequences

1. We have fewer children, if we have them at all
2. We've accumulated a lot less wealth than prior generations
3. We hate the stock market
4. We don't buy homes
5. We trust no-one

I'd say a few of those apply to me but then again I found a job in 2010 in the middle of the Great Recession that paid me more. And although I moved my money out of equities for a long time, the sitting President has renewed my confidence.

The financial crisis happened 10 years ago — that's how long it took this man to sell his house

"Last year, Dezember finally managed to sell the house. He tried to estimate how much money he had lost in 10 years, after tabulating maintenance costs, losses when tenants skipped town, and selling the house for less than he paid for it. He stopped counting at $60,000 US. 'On a house that I only paid $137,000 for, that's pretty tremendous.'"

Honestly if you don't even have 137K to buy a house in some village in Alabama - should you even be a home owner? How does anyone trust you to pay it back? This man moved out of state and continued holding on to the property trying to rent it out and paid 50% more in maintenance and upkeep. At some point a smart intelligent person would just cut his losses and move on. Something tells me some sentiment with the ex girlfriend or wife and/or some stubborn pride thing interrupted logical thinking here.
 

formby

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This is quite clever and made me chuckle...

A Brief History of Philosophy:

1. Socrates deletes his account.

2. Plato posts screenshots of Socrates.

3. Aristotle unfollows Plato.

4. Aquinas retweets Jesus.

5. Descartes mutes Aquinas.

6. Locke mutes Descartes.

7. Kant unfollows Locke and Descartes.

8. Hegel subtweets Kant.

9. Schopenhauer blocks Hegel.

10. Marx likes Hegel.

11. Nietzsche gets hacked.

12. Heidegger DMs Arendt.

13. Adorno reports Heidegger.

14. Derrida gets verified.

15. Heidegger gets banned.

16. Wittgenstein only does instagram.

17. Confucius and Al-Ghazali are still waiting to get verified because of their avatars.
 

Journeyman

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http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20...ent-to-live-frugally-and-retire-decades-early

Retirement at 43? Honestly he must be single. I also see five years of retirement did nothing to improve his visual appearances.
It is possible to take the idea a bit too far, but it is a great and very simple idea - don't let your spending rise in tandem with your income.

I'm fortunate that my wife is very frugal and so she keeps me in check! However, I'm nonetheless amazed at the sheer number of people we know who have two very decent incomes and yet virtually no savings. As an example, one of my colleagues needed to buy a new fridge a couple of years ago back and she actually had to apply for a new credit card just to get the fridge, even though she and her husband must have had a combined income of $160,000 or more. Of course, they both drove European cars (that broke and needed expensive repairs), they ate out at least a couple of times a week, they sent their children to private schools, they took expensive holidays and so on - in other words, they lived up to (and perhaps beyond) the limit of their income. Unfortunately, that doesn't seem uncommon.
 

Fwiffo

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You should read Mr Money Moustache's blog. I think you'd find it interesting.
There's a lot of shilling of different software and services on that site. Maybe that's how he is making money too.

I have quite a bit saved up mostly because as a young kid I had no idea how to spend money (vices, clothing, etc.) and I lived with my parents until I went out to London (where I lived on the company's dime). How did these people spend the first 15-20 years of their working lives happy? Happy Christmas - here's a t-shirt I knit from compost. Or wait, he is eating on $7 a day. Yeah let's have some tilapia that grew in a puddle somewhere.

Plus, as I said, what motivates them after they retire in their 40s?

had a combined income of $160,000 or more. Of course, they both drove European cars (that broke and needed expensive repairs), they ate out at least a couple of times a week, they sent their children to private schools, they took expensive holidays and so on - in other words, they lived up to (and perhaps beyond) the limit of their income. Unfortunately, that doesn't seem uncommon.
Someone has to keep the economy going mate. I have an ex coworker who was like that. As he advanced in the ranks and his wife got out of maternity leave they broke the six figure mark. He had to dip into a line of credit to finance Christmas and a holiday in warmer climes. A timely bonus helped pay it off but with a rental property (his first home) and two incomes you would think you didn't need that. The funny thing is he is an immigrant of a humble background. His father is working retail past retirement age. He went to public school but finances private school for his children even though we both said we did well coming out of the public system. After all it's not like his kids are going to Eton or something.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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I'm fortunate that my wife is very frugal and so she keeps me in check!
My missus is the same, she's seriously tight and likes to save. It's a good virtue to a point, but she'll be contemplating 4 star hotels (even 3 star ones) when a 5 star one for a vacation will be more apt and not that much more expensive. Or why don't we fly through a couple of cities and take 20 hours to save a few bob on flights? And it grieves her awful sore if she buys anything outside of a sale.

Good job I'm ruthless when it comes to decent hotels and restaurants. But I daren't infringe on liberating/repatriating any savings/kids university money. That's off limits.

There's a lot of shilling of different software and services on that site. Maybe that's how he is making money too.

I have quite a bit saved up mostly because as a young kid I had no idea how to spend money (vices, clothing, etc.) and I lived with my parents until I went out to London (where I lived on the company's dime). How did these people spend the first 15-20 years of their working lives happy? Happy Christmas - here's a t-shirt I knit from compost. Or wait, he is eating on $7 a day. Yeah let's have some tilapia that grew in a puddle somewhere.
I always knew how to spend money and earn it relatively speaking. As soon I was going out to pubs, I realised that spending prowess was the real power when it came to the fairer sex. Age too, the kind of ladies I wanted when I was 17-23 would not be interested in a geeky and lanky middle class student, I needed to find a way to usurp this predicament. I always liked enough money to go out and have a great time and buy champagne and drinks for the ladies at the decisive moment.

I didn't have much saved, or at times, anything saved, but I always had enough to have a good time. At least when it counted.

lus, as I said, what motivates them after they retire in their 40s?

Someone has to keep the economy going mate. I have an ex coworker who was like that. As he advanced in the ranks and his wife got out of maternity leave they broke the six figure mark. He had to dip into a line of credit to finance Christmas and a holiday in warmer climes. A timely bonus helped pay it off but with a rental property (his first home) and two incomes you would think you didn't need that. The funny thing is he is an immigrant of a humble background. His father is working retail past retirement age. He went to public school but finances private school for his children even though we both said we did well coming out of the public system. After all it's not like his kids are going to Eton or something.
Two incomes means nothing: mortgage, living expenses, child care and everything else on top is critical. Other then owning everything, paying for everyone....my spending power, me personally, feels about the same as I was when I was single in my early 30s with a lot less responsibilities.
 

Jan Libourel

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North Sentinel Island:

An interesting piece in the recent news about that chap who went to North Sentinel Island in an effort to convert the natives to Jesus, despite the well known practice of the natives to kill any outsider who ventures onto the island. He got pincushioned with arrows for his efforts, but I suppose it brought him the Crown of Martyrdom.

I can recall many years ago talking about North Sentinel Island with one of my best friends, now gone to his reward. I said I thought it was cool that there were still some good, old-fashioned, uncontaminated savages around, this in an era when the grandsons of cannibal chieftains were wearing Madonna T-shirts. He said sadly, "Just think, they'll never know Jesus." This rather put me to shame since I was a much more active churchman at the time, and I had always thought of him as a heathen. Interestingly, I only learned after his death about 20 years later that he had spent a few years as an active Jehovah's Witness. I had always found it surprising that a fellow I thought of as thoroughly secular had such extensive familiarity with the Bible, but that explained it.
 

Fwiffo

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Do cold remedies like chicken soup and vitamin C work?

"As well as trusted friends and family, the placebo effect could also be strengthened by how foods are marketed, Bishop adds.
The good news? Knowing that home remedies are placebos won’t necessarily stop them from alleviating our symptoms. 'Open-label placebos, when a doctor tells the patient something is a placebo but that it’s helped some people, can still make patients better,' she says."

I have to get myself some of this placebo!
 
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I use to work for this outfit, just when the pension schemes favourite top 100 FTSE company, Tilbury Douglas, merged all the Group companies into the many headed hydra of Interserve and promptly put scaffolding foreman and dodgy pretend accountants in charge. You could not make a mess of their business model, lucrative government contracts, to build, operate and sell back over a decade or two. In with Blair/Brown corporatist vision of UK PLC. But somehow they managed to screw it up:

https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/...4YnJ5SnRcLzNkRjJZZWZNM09VV3N5MEpQUHc1KzZzaSJ9
 
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