Good Articles That Don't Deserve Their Own Threads

InstaHate

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Another important question is, “are we past the point of no return?” By “we”, I don't just mean politicians but our institutions and the American public. I’m about 85% sure we are, and I’m guessing Rambo is at 99.9%. If we aren’t past it, a return to civility in our discourse is a necessary (though I feel impossible) first step. If we are past it, I still don’t see what incivility accomplishes beyond the masturbatory.

This has felt like a Pandora’s Box type situation since early in 2016. There are a lot of factors here, but McConnell stands out as an individual.

Edit: Just saw this:
https://www.npr.org/2019/04/01/7081...and-maaaybe-you-ll-get-them-to-agree-with-you
 
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Pimpernel Smith

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When you've popped the pill of intersectionality, post-modernism, post-colonialism and social justice warrior celebrity twitter theory, then inevitably you will find half of your population a basket case of deplorables. Under such circumstances conflict will intensify and empathy towards your competitors dissipate.
 

Rambo

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Another important question is, “are we past the point of no return?” By “we”, I don't just mean politicians but our institutions and the American public. I’m about 85% sure we are, and I’m guessing Rambo is at 99.9%. If we aren’t past it, a return to civility in our discourse is a necessary (though I feel impossible) first step. If we are past it, I still don’t see what incivility accomplishes beyond the masturbatory.

This has felt like a Pandora’s Box type situation since early in 2016. There are a lot of factors here, but McConnell stands out as an individual.

Edit: Just saw this:
https://www.npr.org/2019/04/01/7081...and-maaaybe-you-ll-get-them-to-agree-with-you
100%. We have actual nazis walking around the streets now. I just saw one here the other day.
 

Rambo

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I know that there's a lot of hypocrisy out there, but insulting people and throwing around abuse does alienate people. Quite simply, it just pushes two sides further apart and causes even greater division than already seems to exist.
There's a difference between insulting people and just no longer wanting to deal with their shit. There is no greater division. The olds think the young are tide pod eating faggots. The youngs think the olds are killing the planet because they wont be around. Theyre both right. And saying that isnt a bad thing.
 

Journeyman

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When you've popped the pill of intersectionality, post-modernism, post-colonialism and social justice warrior celebrity twitter theory, then inevitably you will find half of your population a basket case of deplorables.
Maybe I'm incorrect, but it always seemed to me that it was the conservative right that went on the attack first, particularly in places like talkback radio and on Fox programs.

Yes, there is an amount of intellectual arrogance, a bit of sneering down noses that goes on with the liberal left, but it seems that there's more vituperation on the right and that it's been going on longer.
 

InstaHate

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Maybe I'm incorrect, but it always seemed to me that it was the conservative right that went on the attack first, particularly in places like talkback radio and on Fox programs.

Yes, there is an amount of intellectual arrogance, a bit of sneering down noses that goes on with the liberal left, but it seems that there's more vituperation on the right and that it's been going on longer.
Far more than “a bit”, but as an American Republican (until recently, at least), this is largely my impression, though after Trump’s election, both groups are equally guilty.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Maybe I'm incorrect, but it always seemed to me that it was the conservative right that went on the attack first, particularly in places like talkback radio and on Fox programs.

Yes, there is an amount of intellectual arrogance, a bit of sneering down noses that goes on with the liberal left, but it seems that there's more vituperation on the right and that it's been going on longer.
It the past, I agree, but as those ideologies have hit critical mass in the culture, the so called liberal left have become intolerant and ravenous in their appetite to control, dominate and make the right and rest of society submit.

Dig one's own?
They do say that the after-effects of vintage coconut wine is rather divine.
 

QuandoDio

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In the past, well I suppose two or so years is now considered 'past'.

Amusingly, didn't see much course correction during those times. Frankly both sides are antagonistic and to suggest otherwise is nonsensical. I suppose, it depends on your 'tribe'.
 

InstaHate

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In the past, well I suppose two or so years is now considered 'past'.

Amusingly, didn't see much course correction during those times. Frankly both sides are antagonistic and to suggest otherwise is nonsensical. I suppose, it depends on your 'tribe'.
Yeah, but the other side is clearly more antagonistic.
 

Fwiffo

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How to be a better tourist

"That’s a comment I overheard waiting in an immigration queue in Dublin last month. The travellers were talking about Dubrovnik, and how crowded all destinations seem lately. The idea struck me in a weird way. Sure, more people are travelling than ever – which is good. People are broadening their horizons. But reducing destinations to an ever-shrinking collection of 'hidden gems' to be ticked off a bucket list is the kind of attitude that’s fuelling over-tourism.

Over-tourism is a worldwide issue: Peru’s Machu Picchu. Scotland’s scenic Isle of Skye. Gion, Kyoto’s geisha district. Amsterdam’s Red Light district. The canals of Venice. California’s “super-blooming” poppy fields. The Louvre, which reopened late last month after a brief closure when employees walked out because of overwhelming crowds. Thailand’s Maya Bay, now closed to tourists indefinitely.

All these places have been inundated by more tourists than they can handle, both domestic and foreign. Visitors are overcrowding, littering, acting drunk and lewd, causing environmental damage, failing to respect local culture, inappropriately touching or taking things and driving up rents.

According to a January report from the UN World Tourism Organization, international tourist arrivals hit 1.4 billion in 2018. Compare that to just 25 million in 1950, 602 million in 1998 and 936 million in 2008. By 2030, the number is expected to hit 1.8 billion.

There are many factors for this boom: a growing global middle class, cheaper airfares, ambitious tourism targets set by governments and FOMO-inducing social media.

'The question is, do you want to go to a place – or show people you’ve been to the place?' says Eduardo Santander, executive director of the European Travel Commission.

'Half the reason people have superficial travel experiences is because they’ve made superficial plans,' says journalist Becker. She encourages people to do more than read a paragraph in a guide book or copy friends on Facebook, then parachute into a city and get the same selfie they did. Otherwise, you risk committing what Becker calls 'drive-by tourism', which stokes many of the symptoms of over-tourism, like overcrowding and irritating locals."

Pretty much what B ballmouse Pimpernel Smith Pimpernel Smith Kingstonian Kingstonian Journeyman Journeyman were discussing
 
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ter1413

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Incredible images show the intricate designs on Tutankhamun's golden coffin as it is taken out of its sterilisation tent after leaving the pharaoh's tomb for the first time in 97 years for an eight month restoration project

 

Fwiffo

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"
In the years that followed, Fadak says she felt the national mood darken towards refugees.

'The distinction between the everyday community and the general public discourse is the challenge, then and now,' she says. Fadak laments the issues refugees still face in Australia today, 18 years later.

Since 2013, Australia has sent all asylum seekers arriving by boat to the Pacific islands of Manus Island (Papua New Guinea) and Nauru for processing."



If Australians have issues with this refugee, Canada is more than happy to house her in my two bedroom flat.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Absolutely. Eritrean healthcare and medical training is the gold standard.
Exactly. There's also the morality in taking doctors and health workers from countries that desperately need them and have invested in their training from the developing world.

Tried to read, but after a couple of paragraphs I started to gag. WTF was it all about?

The trouble with these people is that their cities have never been bombed.

And before you call me out, that's from Charles Bukowski and how right he was.
 

formby001

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The deluded cult of social justice
Woke revolutionaries don't want to repair society. They just want to overthrow the existing social order
BY John Gray


October 16, 2019

“Justice,” wrote Pascal in the Pensées, “is as much a matter of fashion as charm.” The truth of the 17th-century mathematician and theologian’s observation is richly corroborated at present. Seldom have the demands of justice been so manifestly faddish. Increasingly, justice is seen as not an attribute of legal systems but of entire societies. At the same time it is believed to be owed to groups more than individuals. In these circumstances, everything depends on whether the group to which people are deemed to be belong is in vogue.
Tibetans are no longer à la mode, though the destruction of their civilisation by the Chinese state continues, and few opinion-formers consider the persecution of Christians in the Middle East worth mentioning. Little is heard any more of the Yazidi, despite their still being a target of genocide by Isis. The Kurds are receiving media attention following their betrayal by Trump, but it will surely not be long before they are re-forgotten. Being identified as a victim of injustice has become a kind of privilege, handed out to favoured groups and denied to others according to the shifting diktats of progressive opinion.


A certain arbitrariness goes with demands for social justice. Possibly for this reason, SJWs (social justice warriors) are intolerant of criticism. In the US, anyone who argues that despairing Appalachian proles might be more deserving of concern than middle-class student protesters is condemned as a white supremacist, and their views suppressed. The suggestion that individuals and groups may suffer different degrees and kinds of injustice is rejected as reactionary thinking. Overthrow the prevailing power structures, and injustice will simply vanish. Anyone who questions this vision is not just wrong but evil.


The trouble is that the imperatives of social justice are inherently conflicting. Distributing the goods of society according to equality and merit are not just competitors in practice. Merit and equality are inherently antagonistic values. A number of recent studies have argued — correctly — that the meritocratic claims of western liberal societies are at best partly justified, if not actually fraudulent. But a society that was perfectly just by meritocratic standards would be extremely unjust in egalitarian terms. Some injustices may be worse than others, but no world is imaginable which all the demands of social justice are fully realised.


Markets are condemned because the distribution of income and wealth is partly random. But so is the distribution of genes. If you aim to correct randomness in human fortunes, you may end up in the dystopian world of L.P. Hartley’s Facial Justice (1960), in which people who are “facially over-privileged” are encouraged to have their looks surgically altered. Conversely, gross disparities in educational opportunity are accepted as long as they cannot be defended in terms of merit. In the 1830s Lord Melbourne declared he liked the Order of the Garter best of all his titles because there was “no damned nonsense about merit” attached to it.
Egalitarian thinkers take a similar line today. Selection by ability by grammar schools is rejected by large swathes of progressive opinion. Quite a few seem to find it less objectionable to send their children to schools where selection is by parental income.


Contrary to a familiar line of criticism, there are few signs of hypocrisy in these people. Hypocrisy requires a measure of self-awareness, and there is little evidence of that in them. When they buy an expensive education for their children, might they not be expressing their conscientious revulsion against the evils of meritocracy? No doubt egalitarians who send their children to private schools — or are well-heeled enough to buy a house in a catchment area containing a socially selective comprehensive — are stacking the life-chances of their offspring against those of the majority. But why should any child be denied the good fortune of having progressive parents?


When it does not lead to tragedy, the pursuit of social justice quickly turns to comedy. It is tempting to conclude that the very idea should be junked. That was the argument of F.A. Hayek, strongly articulated in his magnum opus The Constitution of Liberty and reiterated in the second volume of his trilogy Law, Legislation and Liberty: The Mirage of Social Justice. Market processes emerge and operate spontaneously, and the resulting distribution of income and wealth does not correspond to any criterion of a just distribution. Markets reward luck as well as talent and hard work. Being in the right place at the right time is as important in determining anyone’s fortunes as their abilities or virtues. The defence of free markets turns on their superior productivity, not any theory of rights or justice. For the same reason, Hayek opposed any attempt to correct market distributions for the sake of fairness. In his later writings he showed some sympathy for John Rawls’s theory of justice, but this was because Rawls rejected the idea that justice meant redistribution according to what people may be thought to deserve.
Like Rawls and the egalitarian left, Hayek rejected any ideal of meritocracy. In conversations I had with him in the Eighties, he often observed that the fact that the free market operated without regard to anyone’s beliefs about the good life was for him one of its advantages. The price of a virtuous economy would be stagnation. A certain moral indifference was necessary for continuing economic progress. In praising the amorality of free markets, Hayek was influenced by the Anglo-Dutch economist and satirist Bernard de Mandeville, author of the early-18th-century poem Fable of the Bees, which argued that the driving forces of wealth creation and prosperity were needs and impulses that Christianity condemned as vices.


Because it invokes values that are inherently antagonistic, social justice is indeed a mirage. But so is Hayek’s libertarian ideal of a social order in which the market operates without any controls. It is striking how little Hayek learnt from the political disasters of his lifetime (1899-1992) in which liberal regimes were repeatedly swept away by malfunctioning markets. The Nazis came to power on the back of massive economic dislocation. Roosevelt’s interventionism and British social democracy were responses to the Great Depression and the experience of full employment during the Second World War.


Hayek opposed government intervention in the economy because he believed it to be a threat to liberal values. The message of history, however, is that the surest way to overturn a liberal regime is to let the market rip. Events after Hayek’s death confirmed this lesson. The anarchic capitalism of the Yeltsin era produced Putin’s authoritarianism, and post-communist Europe’s populist regimes came to power partly because former communist officials so often benefited most from the shift to a market economy.


If capitalism is legitimated solely by its productivity, anyone who fails to benefit from the wealth it creates has no reason to support a market system. A free market regime will be stable only if it delivers more or less uninterrupted growth and most people benefit from it. Except for a minimum income that protected against destitution, Hayek rejected any kind of intervention in the distribution of income produced by free markets. Yet as he acknowledged in his nod to Rawls, policies that alter market outcomes need not serve ideas of merit or moral deserts.


At present, when large sections of society have failed to benefit from many years of economic growth, measures going well beyond securing people against destitution are required. The goal must be to ensure a decent measure of economic security to everyone. Such policies need not invoke any ideal of social justice. The NHS does not exist in order to transfer resources from the healthy to the unwell, or even to provide medical care to those who cannot afford it. It is there to enable everyone to share a part of their vulnerability in common. Institutions of this kind do not serve distributive ends. They promote social cohesion, and thereby political stability.
Thinking about common institutions in this way is not another iteration of liberalism. The liberal preoccupation with distributive questions is part of the problem. What is needed is to shift to a way of thinking that is clearly post-liberal. Security and the need for a common life must be acknowledged as values that are as compelling as personal freedom, and frame a more coherent picture of a liveable society than inchoate visions of social justice.
The shift may be too great for liberal societies to accept. Protecting people from market-generated insecurity may involve some reduction of overall economic growth. In turn, any long-term slowdown requires high levels of solidarity among those affected. The social democracies of the past were all relatively closed societies — avowedly multi-ethnic but not radically multi-cultural. In practice, multi-culturalism is not so different from anomic individualism. Many are caught between communities and left without a common form of life. Yet that does not mean that large numbers yearn for release from the moral poverty of individualism. Many want greater security than they enjoy now, but not at the price of sacrificing the liberty to live as they please. It is a mistake to think most people in the affluent west want a different way of life.


The largest obstacle to a shift in thinking on these issues is the zeal with which ideas of social justice are held and promoted. The goal of most SJWs is not to repair or improve society. Instead, they want to overthrow the existing social order. Accordingly, they are untroubled if pursuing social justice is actually socially divisive. Like Lenin before the revolution, they believe “worse is better”. If there is anything approaching an iron law in history, however, it is that revolutions are followed by injustice worse than existed in the ancien régime. The French Revolution produced a war against the peasantry in the Vendée (1793-1796) which cost somewhere in excess of a hundred thousand lives. The Russian Revolution produced a lesser known peasant rebellion in the Tambov region (1920-21) in which similar or larger numbers perished. The American Revolution is no exception. For indigenous peoples, which under British rule were sheltered from settler expansion, it was an unmitigated disaster.
But history has no lessons for the “woke”. To accept that revolution only multiplies injustice would destroy the meaning of their lives. The social justice movement is not based on errors in fact or reasoning. It is a cult, whose chief beneficiaries are the SJWs themselves.


At this point we are back to Pascal. He was able to view the shifts and turns of human ideas of justice with equanimity because he was confident a higher justice existed. Lacking any such belief and incapable of living without a surrogate faith, SJWs find meaning in the fantasy of a secular millennium, a battle between good and evil followed by a world they cannot imagine.
 

Rambo

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The deluded cult of social justice
Woke revolutionaries don't want to repair society. They just want to overthrow the existing social order
BY John Gray


October 16, 2019

“Justice,” wrote Pascal in the Pensées, “is as much a matter of fashion as charm.” The truth of the 17th-century mathematician and theologian’s observation is richly corroborated at present. Seldom have the demands of justice been so manifestly faddish. Increasingly, justice is seen as not an attribute of legal systems but of entire societies. At the same time it is believed to be owed to groups more than individuals. In these circumstances, everything depends on whether the group to which people are deemed to be belong is in vogue.
Tibetans are no longer à la mode, though the destruction of their civilisation by the Chinese state continues, and few opinion-formers consider the persecution of Christians in the Middle East worth mentioning. Little is heard any more of the Yazidi, despite their still being a target of genocide by Isis. The Kurds are receiving media attention following their betrayal by Trump, but it will surely not be long before they are re-forgotten. Being identified as a victim of injustice has become a kind of privilege, handed out to favoured groups and denied to others according to the shifting diktats of progressive opinion.


A certain arbitrariness goes with demands for social justice. Possibly for this reason, SJWs (social justice warriors) are intolerant of criticism. In the US, anyone who argues that despairing Appalachian proles might be more deserving of concern than middle-class student protesters is condemned as a white supremacist, and their views suppressed. The suggestion that individuals and groups may suffer different degrees and kinds of injustice is rejected as reactionary thinking. Overthrow the prevailing power structures, and injustice will simply vanish. Anyone who questions this vision is not just wrong but evil.


The trouble is that the imperatives of social justice are inherently conflicting. Distributing the goods of society according to equality and merit are not just competitors in practice. Merit and equality are inherently antagonistic values. A number of recent studies have argued — correctly — that the meritocratic claims of western liberal societies are at best partly justified, if not actually fraudulent. But a society that was perfectly just by meritocratic standards would be extremely unjust in egalitarian terms. Some injustices may be worse than others, but no world is imaginable which all the demands of social justice are fully realised.


Markets are condemned because the distribution of income and wealth is partly random. But so is the distribution of genes. If you aim to correct randomness in human fortunes, you may end up in the dystopian world of L.P. Hartley’s Facial Justice (1960), in which people who are “facially over-privileged” are encouraged to have their looks surgically altered. Conversely, gross disparities in educational opportunity are accepted as long as they cannot be defended in terms of merit. In the 1830s Lord Melbourne declared he liked the Order of the Garter best of all his titles because there was “no damned nonsense about merit” attached to it.
Egalitarian thinkers take a similar line today. Selection by ability by grammar schools is rejected by large swathes of progressive opinion. Quite a few seem to find it less objectionable to send their children to schools where selection is by parental income.


Contrary to a familiar line of criticism, there are few signs of hypocrisy in these people. Hypocrisy requires a measure of self-awareness, and there is little evidence of that in them. When they buy an expensive education for their children, might they not be expressing their conscientious revulsion against the evils of meritocracy? No doubt egalitarians who send their children to private schools — or are well-heeled enough to buy a house in a catchment area containing a socially selective comprehensive — are stacking the life-chances of their offspring against those of the majority. But why should any child be denied the good fortune of having progressive parents?


When it does not lead to tragedy, the pursuit of social justice quickly turns to comedy. It is tempting to conclude that the very idea should be junked. That was the argument of F.A. Hayek, strongly articulated in his magnum opus The Constitution of Liberty and reiterated in the second volume of his trilogy Law, Legislation and Liberty: The Mirage of Social Justice. Market processes emerge and operate spontaneously, and the resulting distribution of income and wealth does not correspond to any criterion of a just distribution. Markets reward luck as well as talent and hard work. Being in the right place at the right time is as important in determining anyone’s fortunes as their abilities or virtues. The defence of free markets turns on their superior productivity, not any theory of rights or justice. For the same reason, Hayek opposed any attempt to correct market distributions for the sake of fairness. In his later writings he showed some sympathy for John Rawls’s theory of justice, but this was because Rawls rejected the idea that justice meant redistribution according to what people may be thought to deserve.
Like Rawls and the egalitarian left, Hayek rejected any ideal of meritocracy. In conversations I had with him in the Eighties, he often observed that the fact that the free market operated without regard to anyone’s beliefs about the good life was for him one of its advantages. The price of a virtuous economy would be stagnation. A certain moral indifference was necessary for continuing economic progress. In praising the amorality of free markets, Hayek was influenced by the Anglo-Dutch economist and satirist Bernard de Mandeville, author of the early-18th-century poem Fable of the Bees, which argued that the driving forces of wealth creation and prosperity were needs and impulses that Christianity condemned as vices.


Because it invokes values that are inherently antagonistic, social justice is indeed a mirage. But so is Hayek’s libertarian ideal of a social order in which the market operates without any controls. It is striking how little Hayek learnt from the political disasters of his lifetime (1899-1992) in which liberal regimes were repeatedly swept away by malfunctioning markets. The Nazis came to power on the back of massive economic dislocation. Roosevelt’s interventionism and British social democracy were responses to the Great Depression and the experience of full employment during the Second World War.


Hayek opposed government intervention in the economy because he believed it to be a threat to liberal values. The message of history, however, is that the surest way to overturn a liberal regime is to let the market rip. Events after Hayek’s death confirmed this lesson. The anarchic capitalism of the Yeltsin era produced Putin’s authoritarianism, and post-communist Europe’s populist regimes came to power partly because former communist officials so often benefited most from the shift to a market economy.


If capitalism is legitimated solely by its productivity, anyone who fails to benefit from the wealth it creates has no reason to support a market system. A free market regime will be stable only if it delivers more or less uninterrupted growth and most people benefit from it. Except for a minimum income that protected against destitution, Hayek rejected any kind of intervention in the distribution of income produced by free markets. Yet as he acknowledged in his nod to Rawls, policies that alter market outcomes need not serve ideas of merit or moral deserts.


At present, when large sections of society have failed to benefit from many years of economic growth, measures going well beyond securing people against destitution are required. The goal must be to ensure a decent measure of economic security to everyone. Such policies need not invoke any ideal of social justice. The NHS does not exist in order to transfer resources from the healthy to the unwell, or even to provide medical care to those who cannot afford it. It is there to enable everyone to share a part of their vulnerability in common. Institutions of this kind do not serve distributive ends. They promote social cohesion, and thereby political stability.
Thinking about common institutions in this way is not another iteration of liberalism. The liberal preoccupation with distributive questions is part of the problem. What is needed is to shift to a way of thinking that is clearly post-liberal. Security and the need for a common life must be acknowledged as values that are as compelling as personal freedom, and frame a more coherent picture of a liveable society than inchoate visions of social justice.
The shift may be too great for liberal societies to accept. Protecting people from market-generated insecurity may involve some reduction of overall economic growth. In turn, any long-term slowdown requires high levels of solidarity among those affected. The social democracies of the past were all relatively closed societies — avowedly multi-ethnic but not radically multi-cultural. In practice, multi-culturalism is not so different from anomic individualism. Many are caught between communities and left without a common form of life. Yet that does not mean that large numbers yearn for release from the moral poverty of individualism. Many want greater security than they enjoy now, but not at the price of sacrificing the liberty to live as they please. It is a mistake to think most people in the affluent west want a different way of life.


The largest obstacle to a shift in thinking on these issues is the zeal with which ideas of social justice are held and promoted. The goal of most SJWs is not to repair or improve society. Instead, they want to overthrow the existing social order. Accordingly, they are untroubled if pursuing social justice is actually socially divisive. Like Lenin before the revolution, they believe “worse is better”. If there is anything approaching an iron law in history, however, it is that revolutions are followed by injustice worse than existed in the ancien régime. The French Revolution produced a war against the peasantry in the Vendée (1793-1796) which cost somewhere in excess of a hundred thousand lives. The Russian Revolution produced a lesser known peasant rebellion in the Tambov region (1920-21) in which similar or larger numbers perished. The American Revolution is no exception. For indigenous peoples, which under British rule were sheltered from settler expansion, it was an unmitigated disaster.
But history has no lessons for the “woke”. To accept that revolution only multiplies injustice would destroy the meaning of their lives. The social justice movement is not based on errors in fact or reasoning. It is a cult, whose chief beneficiaries are the SJWs themselves.


At this point we are back to Pascal. He was able to view the shifts and turns of human ideas of justice with equanimity because he was confident a higher justice existed. Lacking any such belief and incapable of living without a surrogate faith, SJWs find meaning in the fantasy of a secular millennium, a battle between good and evil followed by a world they cannot imagine.
doghouse doghouse is going to love this
 

doghouse

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Well, over throwing the existing order is right up my alley. But the first paragraph alone has three blatant errors listing things people still are all up in arms about as "forgotten", so I'm not sure I should bother with the rest of the piece.
 

Rambo

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Well, over throwing the existing order is right up my alley. But the first paragraph alone has three blatant errors listing things people still are all up in arms about as "forgotten", so I'm not sure I should bother with the rest of the piece.
Gray is one on the subtlest commentators on our current cultural malaise. always worth reading.
Subtlety is a refined art
 

Fwiffo

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"But most of us want to maximise that investment – and that can lead to a plug-and-play type of approach to higher education. Want to be a journalist? Study journalism, we’re told. A lawyer? Pursue pre-law. Not totally sure? Go into Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) – that way, you can become an engineer or IT specialist. And no matter what you do, forget the liberal arts – non-vocational degrees that include natural and social sciences, mathematics and the humanities, such as history, philosophy and languages."

I have a 'worthless' humanities degree. People aren't comparing apples to apples though. One hundred plus years ago there were far fewer career-oriented tracks in university. To reference the article above journalism wasn't a field of study. You studied liberal arts and then pursued work in journalism. Now I see people saying they are entering a bio-medical software engineering program (?! Engineering in the arts and science?!) in computer science which seems more like a community college diploma than a proper university.
 
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