Music Of The Moment

Fwiffo

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I have Our Planet in the background sometimes and I kept thinking who sings in the credits? Oh Ellie Moulding. Love her!
 

Thruth

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Whats the story with The Waterboys? - they were never big here and I haven't heard that much but everything I've heard from them has been better than most
Their second album - A Pagan Place- was quite good. Church Not Made of Hands and red Army Blues were standout tracks in mu opinion. I always associate them with the Alarm.

Karl Wallinger who later went on to World Party was in the band circa this time

 

Kingstonian

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Whats the story with The Waterboys? - they were never big here and I haven't heard that much but everything I've heard from them has been better than most
Fisherman’s blues was over 30 years ago. Irish and Dylan influences. Not heard much of them since.
 

fxh

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Each time I've visited Ireland The Saw Doctors were touring somewhere else in the world.
 

Journeyman

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Has anyone seen The Dirty Three?

I didn't realise until I read a review in the Grauniad, but they did a show a few days ago in Sydney and they're doing two shows in June as part of Dark Mofo in Tasmania.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/may/28/the-dirty-three-review-irrefutable-proof-of

I only caught one of their shows, and it was over twenty years ago - they were supporting the Cruel Sea. The Dirty Three were by far the better of the two acts - full of rambunctious energy. The Cruel Sea were a let-down, mainly because Tex Perkins appeared so drunk he could hardly stand and stumbled and shambled around the stage, slurring and sometimes forgetting the lyrics. A memorable show.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Stumbled on this on the youtube.

1986 was the last consistent wave of Elvis Costello's talent. You had King of America in released in February and then later in the year Blood & Chocolate. In 1987 you had the compilation Out of Our Idiot which was also oustanding and then nothing in 1988 and then in 1989 Spike and the collaborations with Paul McCartney. In between he had unceremoniously ditched The Attractions and he's never done an album of the same quality since. An odd song here and there, but most of it difficult to listen to. Too clever for one's listening pleasure.
 

The Ernesto

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1986 was the last consistent wave of Elvis Costello's talent. You had King of America in released in February and then later in the year Blood & Chocolate. In 1987 you had the compilation Out of Our Idiot which was also oustanding and then nothing in 1988 and then in 1989 Spike and the collaborations with Paul McCartney. In between he had unceremoniously ditched The Attractions and he's never done an album of the same quality since. An odd song here and there, but most of it difficult to listen to. Too clever for one's listening pleasure.
Yes, it was a remarkable burst. Brutal Youth got close I think. Saw him when he toured King of America, Nick Lowe was support. I got backstage afterwards. James Burton, Cait and the whole band were hanging out.
 

Journeyman

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D Day landing tune.

The Germans though Bill Millin was a madman
A photo from the landing on Sword Beach - Bill Millins is immediately in front of the camera on the right hand side and you can see his pipes in front of his head. Millins was the personal piper of Lord Lovat, the brigade commander. Lovat can be seen in the water to the right of the column of men.

 

Pimpernel Smith

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Yes, it was a remarkable burst. Brutal Youth got close I think. Saw him when he toured King of America, Nick Lowe was support. I got backstage afterwards. James Burton, Cait and the whole band were hanging out.
In his autobiography he doesn't ditch the dirt on Cait, but he does say during the marriage he would ''drink the house dry.''

I got the Ten Bloody Marys & Ten How's Your Fathers from the library on tape, released as Taking Liberties in the US, must have been 86 or 87 and it was like I had already heard every song before but not for many years and it was instant resonance. Instant gratification like a coke snort. Every song perfect in a low-fi B-side way. The Style Council were like that too. When I first heard You're The Best Thing, it was the same vibe. Now those songs are too familiar to elicit the same response.

Use to work with Costello's cousin, he looked at that time exactly as Costello does now, same build, receding hair line, but blond hair. He said one time he came up to Liverpool in a blue metallic Rolls Royce with Elvis I personal number plate.

And by way of contrast:

 

The Ernesto

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In his autobiography he doesn't ditch the dirt on Cait, but he does say during the marriage he would ''drink the house dry.''

I got the Ten Bloody Marys & Ten How's Your Fathers from the library on tape, released as Taking Liberties in the US, must have been 86 or 87 and it was like I had already heard every song before but not for many years and it was instant resonance. Instant gratification like a coke snort. Every song perfect in a low-fi B-side way. The Style Council were like that too. When I first heard You're The Best Thing, it was the same vibe. Now those songs are too familiar to elicit the same response.

Use to work with Costello's cousin, he looked at that time exactly as Costello does now, same build, receding hair line, but blond hair. He said one time he came up to Liverpool in a blue metallic Rolls Royce with Elvis I personal number plate.

And by way of contrast:

My Taking Liberties vinyl below. Have also got Ten Bloody Marys, so totally in sad sack territory.

Funny you should say that about Cait, she left a bit early that night and the only exchange I had with her was when she was grabbing a traveler on the way out and asked if one brand of local beer was better than the other. I can imagine they both gave it a fair nudge.

Elvis.jpg
 

Kingstonian

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Noel Hill said the Pogues were an abortion of Irish music.

I agreed with him - though I now have some Pogues CDs. Pogues responded with an unremarkable track in Noel’s ‘honour’.

I have seen Noel live a couple of times, requesting he play Lucy Campbell’s reel on the last occasion. Here he is playing the same reel :-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8icdP_Fjro

Concertina is the Clare man’s trumpet. Shame about the man spreading. Seems unnecessary.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Noel Hill said the Pogues were an abortion of Irish music.
I agreed with him - though I now have some Pogues CDs. Pogues responded with an unremarkable track in Noel’s ‘honour’.
There was a number of elements in The Pogues going on: the punk, the veneration of booze and the rapscallion pirate gang that you could join by getting pissed in an Irish pub to the accordian of James Fearnley, the penny whistle of Spider Stacey and the lyrics of Shane MacGowan. In that respect they were unique and pulled it off better than any band before or since.

 

fxh

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Last week I watched Rolling Thunder and Rocketman. Both good although RT is probably for Bob fans.
 
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