The knitwear thread

florisgreen

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Drakes does look similar to one of the Lockie shawls, but l understand Laing has made for Drakes, T&A and A Suitable Wardrobe in the past, and all have high prices, much higher than companies that use Lockie.

Now T&A are using Corgi in Wales to make their shawl cardigans, but the prices are far higher than Lockies at nearly 1,300 GBP for what looks to be a 4 ply cardigan.

View attachment 36370View attachment 36372
Don't know about quality and thickness, but this Turnbull&Asser model looks really nice, with a tighter, more modern fitting. Also nice to me to see horn buttons instead of the traditional leather covered ones. Do you know whether Corgi produces for other brands as well? Or maybe does T&A own the factory?
 

ballmouse

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I'm back to working on making a new sweater with a local factory and we touched on the subject of ply. Chances are if the factory is using the same yarn for everything and updating the ply that's a bit off.

Ply relates to the yarn. The sweater itself will be knit a X number of cones where X * ply is possibly the ply they keep referencing. Of course it sounds better to say 4 ply rather than 2 ply yarn knit with 2 cones so it's understandable and how many customer really know what the hell that number means?
 

florisgreen

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Not sure.


T&A don't own the factory, they always have a factory make for them.
Thank you! By the way I have the strong suspicion that T&A have their socks made by Pantherella. I have both and they are virtually identical, but T&A charge more than the double price (45/50 EUR) as compared to the Pantherella correspoding product (19,50 GBP, Naish long merino socks).
 

florisgreen

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Ballantyne is producing in Scotland again, even though still under Italian ownership. Has anybody some informations about? Whether they let someone else produce, or they have their own factory. And has anybody experienced their RAW DIAMOND capsule, about material, knitting and styling? It seems that, besides perhaps a more fashionable style, they are trying to link to their glorious tradition. It will be interesting to follow this evolution.
On the other hand, what do you think of BERK, who claim to be Ballantyne's legitimate legacy, still producing the "bare finish" cashmere, which Ballantyne was famous for?
 

The Shooman

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Ballantyne is producing in Scotland again, even though still under Italian ownership. Has anybody some informations about? Whether they let someone else produce, or they have their own factory. And has anybody experienced their RAW DIAMOND capsule, about material, knitting and styling? It seems that, besides perhaps a more fashionable style, they are trying to link to their glorious tradition. It will be interesting to follow this evolution.
I wouldn't get too excited about Ballantyne. They are all over the place: they have companies produce in China, they personally produce in Inner Mongolia, they mass produce intarsia in Italy, and they now produce some jumpers in Scotland under Raw Diamond. Who is this company? What is their identity? They are trying to cover all bases, but they are nothing anymore. They contract a Scottish company to produce the raw diamond hoping that will elevate their luxury image??

Even when the real Ballantyne existed, by the 2,000's none of their stuff was great anymore despite it being unprocessed, it all pilled. The days of the golden era of cashmere seemed to be gone, so what really happened? The companies were the same and the processes were the same, and the hand collecting of cashmere was the same, but only one thing was different from my understanding. What? The goat herds during the late 80's greatly increased (more than 4 times the herds on the same land), and all the natural plant growth got ripped up and the land become dry and ruined. The goat herders had to feed the goats a different source of food to feed the over populated herd. Apparently the decline in feed quality changed the quality of the cashmere. The cashmere used to be consistent, hardly any pilling at all in the top brands, but now the top Italian brands and scottish brands nearly all pill...even Hermes Scotland pills a bit. The only brand's cashmere that seems consistently good is Loro Piana, and this makes sense because they own their own Inner Mongolia cashmere herds. It still makes me wonder how they do it....how do they manage such a large supply of cashmere and keep it high quality? Do the goats eat the natural foodstuffs like they did in the 70's and 80's? Or do Loro Piana cut corners a bit? There are so many things we probably don't know, but l do think about these things, there are so many questions l would like to ask experts.

Ballantyne are producing in Scotland for some pieces again, but it is not the old Ballantyne, and it is not a Ballantyne factory; instead it is some factory they have contracted to make some things. I wonder how the quality of raw diamond is also. I nearly bought a piece of raw diamond last year.

On the other hand, what do you think of BERK, who claim to be Ballantyne's legitimate legacy, still producing the "bare finish" cashmere, which Ballantyne was famous for?

Be careful. About 12 months ago Berk went into administration, and many changes appear to have been made IMO . Looks like they no longer use the old Ballantyne workers, and no mention of the high density knitting they always raved about. Looks like all the good stuff they had is no longer. So who is making Berk cashmere now? The bare finish is always good, but that doesn't necessarily make it better. Seems like a lot of promotion, but no substance. So if they can't get the old world cashmere quality, and they aren't using the old Ballantyne looms, and they aren't using the old Ballantyne workers and they aren't using the high density knitting, then what are they offering that is special?

Cashmere is so overblown now. Democratisation of cashmere has ruined it. IMO it is about having too many goats on the land in too many wrong areas that allows for poor food sources and too many shortcuts in collecting the cashmere from the goats. The industry seems too big now, and the goat herders want the extra money, so they cut the corners. Hermes' Scotland probably has the best jumpers made today...old world thickness and quality made to last, but the quality of the cashmere is not what it used to be. I wonder what the exact issue is. Loro Piana seems pretty good cashmere, but it is not what it used to be either, and those jumpers are those thinner ply jumpers not made like the Scottish.

So many issues with cashmere now, so l wouldn 't get too excited about anything the cashmere companies say anymore. A lot of them puff up big nothings.
 

güero

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On the other hand, what do you think of BERK, who claim to be Ballantyne's legitimate legacy, still producing the "bare finish" cashmere, which Ballantyne was famous for?
Had a very bad experience with them, it’s described in this thread. Never received the products, no communication whatsoever, took some time and effort to get my money back. For sure wouldn’t recommend ordering there, even if they are as good as they claim to be.
 

figurine

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I'm not an expert, but today's Ballantyne doesn't bring much confidence to me, though they do seem to be popular among some 'nouveau riche' around.

Speaking of Scottish vs. Italian cashmere, couldn't resist buying this one, as I miss chunky stuff in my collection - this one is nearly 500g heavy.
As mentioned before, it does seem much softer and less densely knitted than the Scottish counterparts... however, I don't see many chunkier Schottish cashmere knits around - they seem to be plain in many cases.

Malo x Eddy Monetti - this will probably pill a lot, but think it was worth it:
1614701445317.png
 

The Shooman

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I'm not an expert, but today's Ballantyne doesn't bring much confidence to me, though they do seem to be popular among some 'nouveau riche' around.

I think your perception is good. These types of companies represent little that is good imo. They are a dime a dozen company that do poor customer service, and they are pushing cheaply made product at high prices for the most part. None-the-less, good on them for having some product made in Scotland again.


Speaking of Scottish vs. Italian cashmere, couldn't resist buying this one, as I miss chunky stuff in my collection - this one is nearly 500g heavy.
As mentioned before, it does seem much softer and less densely knitted than the Scottish counterparts... however, I don't see many chunkier Schottish cashmere knits around - they seem to be plain in many cases.

Malo x Eddy Monetti - this will probably pill a lot, but think it was worth it:
View attachment 36404

Malo is decent. 500 grams is not that chunky and heavy. Very difficult to find chunky heavy knits made in Scotland, they are rare as hen's teeth. No-one wants to part with them because they are loved too much by their owners.

I have an old Scottish knit in perfect condition from the 60's. One of the most chunky knits you will ever see. It represents the true luxuriousness of chunky knits. It has total wow factor. No wonder people don't want to part with them. The man who used to own it absolutely loved it, and l absolutely love it too. Fits perfectly. Could be my favourite knit.
 

The Shooman

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I bought two of the world's highest quality vintage navy cashmere cardigans recently. From Scotland of course.

Ballantyne cashmere navy cardigan (hardly worn)
Ballantyne navy cashmere cardigan 1.jpg

Caerlee navy cashmere cardigan (made all of Ballantyne's vintage knitwear).

This cardigan is missing a top button so i'll have to grab one off the back of another cardigan and sew it on.
Caerlee nacy cashmere cardigan.jpg

I wear them in the Spring and Autumn with grey trousers and a nice dress shirt. I will try not to get any more.
 
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robertito

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I bought two of the world's highest quality vintage navy cashmere cardigans recently. From Scotland of course.

Ballantyne cashmere navy cardigan (hardly worn)
View attachment 36417

I had this on my watch list. The price you paid was excellent but as per the description and pictures it is not hardly won. A button was missing and the description says 'gently used' .

Also the name of the previous owner was written on the tag (it is silly but a big turn off for me)

What clues did you follow to bid for it? For me it was a pass.
 

The Shooman

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I had this on my watch list. The price you paid was excellent but as per the description and pictures it is not hardly won. A button was missing and the description says 'gently used' .

Also the name of the previous owner was written on the tag (it is silly but a big turn off for me)

What clues did you follow to bid for it? For me it was a pass.

The buttons on this are all in tact, this cardigan is in great condition. The name written all over the tag was a turnoff, but sometimes a turnoff can create a great opportunity to knock out competition bidders.

Don't like that l have Douglas Foster written on my tag, but maybe l can fix it so it won't show. The main thing is that l have a the world's greatest 2 ply cashmere cardigan for an excellent price.

Eventhough Ballantyne was tops, Pringle also made some dryer cashmere that matched Ballantyne, but overall Ballantyne made the best knitwear of them all. Why? Because it hardly pilled and was made to last. It always felt better made than anything else overall. Got an old Hermes made by Ballantyne too, that jumper is as tough as nails....seems impossible to pill, incredible!

Hermes Scotland today made like the Lyle & Scott of old with a nice thick ply (very unique), but it still was not as good as the old L&S. I love Lyle & Scott, very unique and special, and it never seems to pill.
Ballantyne navy cashmere cardigan 2.jpg
 
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robertito

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Isn't a button missed on this image or am I missing something? Maybe is a picture of the back of the placket?

1614762884203.png
 

The Shooman

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Yes, that is the back of the placket, and that pic might look like a missing button, but it is not; it is a button being secured to the back of the placket. That button you see is a spare button, and l may have to use it for my other Caerlee. Those buttons are mother of pearl too, not the usual plastic buttons you see on `so called' highend knitwear today.

Hermes Scotland still use mother of pearl.
 

florisgreen

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Had a very bad experience with them, it’s described in this thread. Never received the products, no communication whatsoever, took some time and effort to get my money back. For sure wouldn’t recommend ordering there, even if they are as good as they claim to be.
Thank you for reporting about your experience. It's obviously very annoying what you describe, but since you didn't get the ordered stuff, it's not possible to express a quality assesment, what I would interested about.
Nobody in this forum owns knitwear from Berk?
 

The Shooman

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Thank you for reporting about your experience. It's obviously very annoying what you describe, but since you didn't get the ordered stuff, it's not possible to express a quality assesment, what I would interested about.
Nobody in this forum owns knitwear from Berk?

There are all types of Berk knitwear over different time periods, but the Berk quality you and l want to know is the Berk made by the old Ballantyne workers in recent years.

I have Berk 3 ply turtlenecks by Ballantyne made in the 90's and the quality is superb, though not as great cashmere like the 80's and earlier. I also have a very decent Berk 3 ply turtleneck by William Lockie, but the quality is definitely not as nice as the Ballantyne and it pilled much more. I think l have other earlier Berks from an earlier period that are outstanding. The point is, all the Berks are different depending on the period.
 

florisgreen

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I'm not an expert, but today's Ballantyne doesn't bring much confidence to me, though they do seem to be popular among some 'nouveau riche' around.

Speaking of Scottish vs. Italian cashmere, couldn't resist buying this one, as I miss chunky stuff in my collection - this one is nearly 500g heavy.
As mentioned before, it does seem much softer and less densely knitted than the Scottish counterparts... however, I don't see many chunkier Schottish cashmere knits around - they seem to be plain in many cases.

Malo x Eddy Monetti - this will probably pill a lot, but think it was worth it:
View attachment 36404
I can only recommend to buy some MALO knitwear. They produce nice stuff at reasonable prices. They are in my opinion better value than BRUNELLO CUCINELLI or LORO PIANA, whose products are much overpriced. I also prefer MALO's style above their counterparts': better fitting (at least for me) and nice, different colours and details, whereas CUCINELLI, especially, is very boring with its dusty, subdued tones, always the same in years.
As already mentioned, I have some jumpers from MALO, mostly plain 1ply vee-necks, older than 20 years that look like new. Yes, I care a lot, never wear a knit garment longer than one day, but those MALO barely pill and have retained their shape, whereas some newer JOHNSTONS pill consistently more.
I recently bought two 2ply MALO cardigans that look just gorgeous: curious to see them getting older.
 

The Shooman

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Interesting how you find CUCINELLI boring. To me they make the most beautiful and exciting cashmere knitwear of anyone by a big margin. It always looks spectacular. Too pricey and too much pilling though, and plastic buttons.

My Malo 10 ply is excellent, but my Malo 2 ply started pilling moderately after a year or so but is still decent. Good honest cashmere.
 

florisgreen

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There are all types of Berk knitwear over different time periods, but the Berk quality you and l want to know is the Berk made by the old Ballantyne workers in recent years.

I have Berk 3 ply turtlenecks by Ballantyne made in the 90's and the quality is superb, though not as great cashmere like the 80's and earlier. I also have a very decent Berk 3 ply turtleneck by William Lockie, but the quality is definitely not as nice as the Ballantyne and it pilled much more. I think l have other earlier Berks from an earlier period that are outstanding. The point is, all the Berks are different depending on the period.
Thank you! But, as you remarked, what would be really interesting is to know whether the current production is really worth and comparable with that of the old times Ballantyne, or what they claim is just selling strategy with no confirmation in the reality.
 

florisgreen

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Interesting how you find CUCINELLI boring. To me they make the most beautiful and exciting cashmere knitwear of anyone by a big margin. It always looks spectacular. Too pricey and too much pilling though, and plastic buttons.

My Malo 10 ply is excellent, but my Malo 2 ply started pilling moderately after a year or so but is still decent. Good honest cashmere.
Of course it's a matter of taste, if you like or not some style. Besides of finding CUCINELLI's product overpriced, I don't find their style exciting, if boring is a little bit excessive. They always present the same tones: grey, cream, beige, navy, bordeaux. Honestly I can't speak of their quality because I have nothing from them (for the above reasons).
 

güero

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Thank you for reporting about your experience. It's obviously very annoying what you describe, but since you didn't get the ordered stuff, it's not possible to express a quality assesment, what I would interested about.
Nobody in this forum owns knitwear from Berk?
Yes of course that would be nice to know (that’s why I ordered in the first place), but since they can’t be trusted it doesn’t really matter imho. I agree with The Shooman The Shooman Berk was never a manufacturer and the old, good stuff was made by Ballantyne, which doesn’t exist anymore.
 
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Thruth

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I think this may be the most fascinating post l have ever read, so interesting. I can well understand your interest in warm clothing given your location. I have become like you in that l am very interested in warm clothes too, but no way near your level of course because my circumstances don't dictate l take it all the way like you have.

The Arctic? What?? What were you doing up there? 😲
Thanks The Shooman The Shooman . I neglected to respond. I had a number of stints in the Arctic. Clinician, administrator, CEO, supplier of health care mercenaries.

and that brings up lifelong questions for me....cars/trucks and freezing weather. How on earth do people start their vehicles and survive??? No need to tell me that, but it's a great mystery to me. You must have special cars up that way. If Oz got your cold, none of our cars would start and we'd all perish in days. You are obviously a real master of your environment...absolutely incredible you you have developed the knowledge.
You know what Shoey? It's like what you have to do to a vehicle in the outback, except the opposite. Block heater to warm the coolant. Electric battery blankets to insulate the battery so it doesn't freeze, trickle charger to keep it topped up. I always ran two batteries and all the other gear. When it's really cold, guys with Diesel engines just leave them run overnight. Some will have interior car warmers to keep it toasty but I think it is a fire risk. No special cars. 4x4 is a good idea. Plus there are snowmobiles and quads on the roads too. Just pull the start cord and give'er.

btw, l looked up the British-made Rab parka and MH Absolute Zero parkas. They are something i'd never need, but something inside me makes me curious about them and makes me want to test them out. Of course i'll probably never do it, but curious minds interested in the warmest clothes get curious about these things.
You should do only to find out. Here is where you and I differ. For you, 12-ply cashmere or wool makes sense in your pursuit for warmth given your climate and your style. For me, it is the law of diminishing returns. Beyond the Dachstein heft, higher plies will not return enough warmth to weight as down or synthetic insulation for me when I need something warmer. I also reserve heavy wool fabric for overcoats. Because a lighter weight wool + a down or synthetic insulation lining is warmer. And I have a 34 ounce camel hair polo coat. At -53 windchill a couple of weeks ago, my mid layer was a down pullover anorak, no hood, with 170g of 850+ fill power down weighing all of 400g. Merino base layers beneath. Fleece-lined pullover anorak over top. So that is how I approach it.

Can't wait until the cold season comes back; i'll be pulling out my Belgium Army long johns, my thickest shawl cardigans, my BIG Daddy boiled wool jumper to wear on the cold mornings and all my thickest knitwear. Gotta say, that 34oz peacoat from 1949 keeps me warmer than any coat l have ever owned, l get too hot in it if l walk too much, but it is a good coat for standing around outside on on the coldest days. The problem with the 1949 peacoat is that it is restrictive of movement (low armholes or something, but not tight, but hard to put arms up in the air), but o.k when just walking normal with arms at your side.

The guy who sold me the boiled jumper said he used to ski in it before ski jackets were used. He said it was extremely warm and extremely heavy. I like heavy clothes, and l will be getting 18 oz tweed trousers made and the heaviest cords l can possibly get. I want to master my winter wear for my climate and individual needs. I have nearly completed this 4 year task. Need a few accessories (hats and gloves) and l am done. And yes, l will be getting those thick Dachstein socks to wear with my Kiss extra wide brogues that Fritzl sold me on special occasions when l really want to treat myself to the best in cold weather treats, the same as when l wear my English made 4 ply alpaca knee high socks reserved for the coldest days. I only have 8 pairs of alpaca socks, so l ration them...can't buy them anymore, they might get worn 8 times per year with shell cordovan Vass shoes (treat for the feet).
If you can find them, the last generation of wool German army pants might be to your liking. But they have cargo pockets, so that may not be your thing. Field pants. Internal double knee. Hidden pocket buttons. Heavy cotton pocket bags. Button fly. Button side adjusters. Dense wool and does not wet through easily. Heavyweight.

1615005565869.jpeg

1615005666055.jpeg

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1615005807586.jpeg
 

Journeyman

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Block heater to warm the coolant. Electric battery blankets to insulate the battery so it doesn't freeze, trickle charger to keep it topped up. I always ran two batteries and all the other gear. When it's really cold, guys with Diesel engines just leave them run overnight. Some will have interior car warmers to keep it toasty but I think it is a fire risk.

I remember reading that in order to start their tanks in the Russian winter in WWII, German tank crews used to light fires underneath the tank engines to warm them up.
 

The Shooman

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Will get back to Truth's post later.

For now, here is a nice turtleneck l bought.

Howlin' made-in-Scotland wool turtleneck.

Postage was way too high and l almost passed on it, but it looked very nice and was a turtleneck and was my size, so l bought it.
Howlin' turtleneck wool 1.jpgHowlin' turtleneck wool 2.jpg
 

Journeyman

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Howlin' made-in-Scotland wool turtleneck.

Where did you buy it from?

End Clothing in the UK sells Howlin'. I've bought some Jamieson's jumpers and some hiking boots from End before and have been very happy with the shipping and service.

Howlin':

Jamieson's:

 

The Shooman

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Where did you buy it from?

End Clothing in the UK sells Howlin'. I've bought some Jamieson's jumpers and some hiking boots from End before and have been very happy with the shipping and service.

Howlin':

Jamieson's:


Thanks for the links. Nice selection on those sites.

Got mine from ebay because l liked the style. Convenient and simple.

Here is a post l wrote last night on my top ten jumpers. I have many great jumpers, but certain ones stand out. Here is my list.


Top 10 knitwear

The top 3 masterpieces - all from 1940's - 1960's. Nothing touches these three pieces.

- 1960's Austrian Dikter Derkogner

Boiled wool, thick and heavy. The most impressive piece of knitwear l own. Nothing touches this in thickness and warmth. Bulletproof and more wool than a 12 ply.


- 1960's Mc George shawl cardigan (like an 8 ply)

Thick, warm and beautiful. One of my greatest pleasures. So well made and very stylish.


- 1940's Abercrombie and Fitch wool turtleneck (like a 12 ply)

The heaviest jumper l own, and the knit is very dense. Much heavier than the very best arans (maybe 3 - 4 times heavier), and much warmer too. Like a 12 ply wool. Bulletproof and an 8th wonder of the world, nothing comes close in quality today, and not one single pill.

That closes the section for the most incredible knitwear ever made.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

- 1980's - Ballantyne turtlenecks

The highest quality 2 ply cashmere l own. I have 3 of them, but the most impressive is made for Paul Stuart (a green 3 ply turtleneck that is as tough as nails). All are hard dry unprocessed cashmere, and nothing comes close today. They seem impossible to pill.


- 1990's Ballantyne 6 ply shawl cardigan

Very luxurious and comfortable with doubled 6 ply collar (like 12 ply), but some pilling. Would have been good to have owned a 70's or 80's 6 ply shawl collar. The quality is very good, but no match for the top 3 above, none-the-less it is pure luxury.


- Ballantyne 4 ply intarsia crewneck

A masterpiece from the 80s. Bought it new.


- Ballantyne 4 ply intarsia polo short

A masterpiece from the 80s.


- plush Hermes scotland orange turtleneck

The ultimate in luxury. Soft, thick and plush and a pleasure to wear. An example of how turtlenecks should be.


- N Peal 6 ply shawl cardigan

Great cashmere that seems impossible to pill, and gorgeous style and collar. A nice slouchy comfortable cardigan. Low arm holes.


- Ballantyne 3 ply turtlenecks 1990's

Plush thick luxury. Some pilling. Feel very lucky to own them


- Malo 10 ply cable knit crewneck

Just a great jumper.
Malo - 8 ply 3.jpg



honourable mentions

- Pringle navy v neck cashmere jumper

- Hermes peach v neck cashmere jumper

Both are bulletproof an examples of the highest quality v neck jumpers l own. Seems imposssible to pill and nothing compared to them today. On the level of those Ballantyne turtlenecks l own from the 80's.
 
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robertito

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how does camel hair compare against cashmere? And does only comes in camel/tan colour?

I do have a nice one in the pipeline. Mid 80 as per the buyer and "hardly worn"
 

The Shooman

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how does camel hair compare against cashmere?

I've never worn camel wool, but it is a luxury fiber and apparently is getting up there near cashmere, but of course cashmere is king....it is softer and warmer and more luxurious.

It is very interesting to experience the different types of wool. Possum is supposed to be good too, very warm and fine. When l got my shetland cardigan l thought it would be really heavy, but it was really light yet warm. I need to research more on shetland wool to understand why it is like it is.


And does only comes in camel/tan colour?

Mostly. Same with Vicuna, but occasionally it will be coloured.

I do have a nice one in the pipeline. Mid 80 as per the buyer and "hardly worn"
No need to worry, l won't be buying anymore jumpers for a while. I've got a sportscoat and cords to get.
 

The Shooman

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I might also get one of these later in winter or next year. Crewneck boiled wool jumpers by Dachstein. Heavy 3 pound jobs. The issue with these is that layers need to be worn underneath or else they can be itchy. Also good to choose a size up, so if you are 22 pit to pit you would go for 23 or 23.5 pit to pit.
 

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figurine

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how does camel hair compare against cashmere? And does only comes in camel/tan colour?

I do have a nice one in the pipeline. Mid 80 as per the buyer and "hardly worn"
Can recommend camel hair. It can vary a lot in terms of touch, but it is generally softer than wool and has some "hairy" appearance.

This is my dream camel hair sweater, though mine are pleasant too:
1615387142179.png

*as found on: http://www.thetweedpig.com/2015/12/peter-scott-camel-sweater.html

And btw, there was not much talk about Peter Scott, another brand that doesn't exist anymore.
Got couple of their jumpers (cashmere and camel hair), and I really find them very decent. Some deadstock also appear from time to time.
Anyone else tried them out?
 

florisgreen

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Can recommend camel hair. It can vary a lot in terms of touch, but it is generally softer than wool and has some "hairy" appearance.

This is my dream camel hair sweater, though mine are pleasant too:
View attachment 36502
*as found on: http://www.thetweedpig.com/2015/12/peter-scott-camel-sweater.html

And btw, there was not much talk about Peter Scott, another brand that doesn't exist anymore.
Got couple of their jumpers (cashmere and camel hair), and I really find them very decent. Some deadstock also appear from time to time.
Anyone else tried them out?
Agree about both camelhair and Peter Scott. I have a cashmere and a camelhair jumpers from that brand, both vee-necks, and they are really excellent. I bought them in a shop in Rome and, even though not aware of their time production, they were clearly new old stock items. I really love camelhair, just a pity that it has become so seldom nowadays. As you say it has a somehow "hairy" look and is softer and lighter than wool. I also have 2 cable knit crew-necks from Malo and a vee-neck from Alan Paine in camel as well. William Lockie offers a vee-neck and a shawl collar cardigan in camelhair.
 

Panama

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how does camel hair compare against cashmere? And does only comes in camel/tan colour?

I do have a nice one in the pipeline. Mid 80 as per the buyer and "hardly worn"
Camel is one of my favourite fibres. I have been buying Alan Paine Camel hair sweaters for over 40 years. William Lockie also produce a Camel hair sweater that is on my wishlist. I am sure I have seen dyed Camel hair.

My current Alan Paine Camel hair sweater...

20210310_203638.jpg
 
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Panama

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I have had Hodgson of Scotland for years, which was a brand bought by Peter Scott in 2003. I have recently added some NOS Peter Scott to my collection...

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The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
3,017
Wow, that is a lot of jumpers Panama, and many in the same colours, and many with tags still on them. You seem to be a man who knows what he likes and sticks with it. Thanks for posting your collection.
 

robertito

Well-Known Member
Messages
918
Camel is one of my favourite fibres. I have been buying Alan Paine Camel hair sweaters for over 40 years. William Lockie also produce a Camel hair sweater that is on my wishlist. I am sure I have seen dyed Camel hair.

My current Alan Paine Camel hair sweater...

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Thank you. I let it go in the end. It sold out for 29 quid.

How is Hodgson quality? Actually that camel hair on was from Hodgson.

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