The knitwear thread

The Shooman

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Those NOS Ballantynes sold for 40 GBP and 47 GBP. If he had have sold them to me he would have gotten much more for them. That usually happens, the auctions that won't sell to Oz go cheap and they miss out on the big bucks.
 

belinmad

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Those NOS Ballantynes sold for 40 GBP and 47 GBP. If he had have sold them to me he would have gotten much more for them. That usually happens, the auctions that won't sell to Oz go cheap and they miss out on the big bucks.
Next time happy to get it for you and send it over, Shooey.
 

florisgreen

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Those NOS Ballantynes sold for 40 GBP and 47 GBP. If he had have sold them to me he would have gotten much more for them. That usually happens, the auctions that won't sell to Oz go cheap and they miss out on the big bucks.
Unbelievable how cheap they sold! Possible that the auction was short-lasting so it went under the radar of many connoisseurs, but those prices are totally laughable.
By the way, were they your size, or you had bought them anyway for collecting?
 

The Shooman

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Next time happy to get it for you and send it over, Shooey.

There won't be a next time. Those types of deals are once in a lifetime.

Unbelievable how cheap they sold! Possible that the auction was short-lasting so it went under the radar of many connoisseurs, but those prices are totally laughable.
By the way, were they your size, or you had bought them anyway for collecting?
They were my size. I have been wanting a red 2 ply cashmere cardigan for many years. I messaged him asking him to allow Oz bidders, but he said no. I ended up messaging after the auction saying he could have made big bucks had he allowed me to bid.

I remember there was a stunning John Laing argyle once. The lady simply refused to sell it to me no matter how much l offered her. It sold for a fraction of what l would have given her. Many U.K and U.S.A auctions don't allow aussie bidders.
 

The Shooman

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One of the most amazing Ballantynes l saw on U.K ebay was this brand new old stock:
Ballantyne nordic jumper.jpg

I once got this 80's Ballantyne brand new. A fantastic turtleneck, but still had to pay a pretty penny for it.
Ballantyne green turtleneck.jpg

I have missed out of a number of great deals on ebay due to sellers refusing to sell to me, but l have also had my fair share of luck. I can't complain. I am happy for others to get lucky too, but l hope they appreciate the items like l would. On ebay the luck is shared, and l think that is a good thing. If l had all the luck and got all the goodies, it would not be fair. Everyone needs a chance.
 

The Shooman

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:rolleyes:

hopefully there's another one of these soon".

You see belinmad belinmad ebay can be an amazing place to buy jumpers, you can find absolute gold if you are patient. To me there is little knitwear l would even consider buying new from the shops these days, but ebay has some great stuff from time to time. For it is mainly about turtlenecks and thick Scottish shawl cardigans these days, and sometimes an occasional argyle or intarsia from Ballantyne.

Here is the John Laing l tried to snag once, a 1970's NOS.
John Laing amazing 1970's 1.jpg
 

florisgreen

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There won't be a next time. Those types of deals are once in a lifetime.


They were my size. I have been wanting a red 2 ply cashmere cardigan for many years. I messaged him asking him to allow Oz bidders, but he said no. I ended up messaging after the auction saying he could have made big bucks had he allowed me to bid.

I remember there was a stunning John Laing argyle once. The lady simply refused to sell it to me no matter how much l offered her. It sold for a fraction of what l would have given her. Many U.K and U.S.A auctions don't allow aussie bidders.
Some people are simply obtuse and are unable to grab the luck they have offered. He had got so much more and had made a real connoisseur happy.
 

belinmad

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You see belinmad belinmad ebay can be an amazing place to buy jumpers, you can find absolute gold if you are patient. To me there is little knitwear l would even consider buying new from the shops these days, but ebay has some great stuff from time to time. For it is mainly about turtlenecks and thick Scottish shawl cardigans these days, and sometimes an occasional argyle or intarsia from Ballantyne.

Here is the John Laing l tried to snag once, a 1970's NOS.
View attachment 38880

Absolutely! Other than the random new purchase I do every now and then, mostly if I fall in love with a piece, trying someone new, or when I'm buying everyday stuff (like the Smedley merinos), most of my knitwear comes from eBay - vintage pieces that are absolutely fantastic and with a little bit of tl&c you can bring back to very good condition. I wash them, mend them and remove piling when I get I get used ones, and the before/after difference is astounding.

As you say, if you are patient and dedicated you can find absolute gems.
 

florisgreen

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On ebay the luck is shared, and l think that is a good thing. If l had all the luck and got all the goodies, it would not be fair. Everyone needs a chance.
This is a noble thought. It would be also impossible to buy all the nice stuff we like. As you say, hopefully the lucky buyers are able to appreciate their luck and their goods.
 

florisgreen

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Arrived today:

20210624_120258.jpg
20210624_115557.jpg


Nice material and colour, defined as Bambù. Frankly a little disappointed by the pretty coarse level of finishing (see how irregular the seams are), even considering that by this thickness it could be difficult to be more precise and it could be actually part of its charm.

Here another turtleneck from William Lockie:

20210624_115954.jpg


In comparison this appear to be quite more accurate in the finishing: look at those nice armholes.

By the way the McGeorge is defined as a 3-ply whereas the Lockie as a 6-ply, but they look almost identical to me in thickness and gauge: can somebody explain this incongruity?
 

The Shooman

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By the way the McGeorge is defined as a 3-ply whereas the Lockie as a 6-ply, but they look almost identical to me in thickness and gauge: can somebody explain this incongruity?

Lockie can sometimes use a very low gauge count, that would explain why the 6 ply isn't too thick. A high ply count doesn't always mean much. I have seen 12 ply from China look very thin. 12 ply Brunello cucinelli is only medium thick. If l saw that Lockie there is no way l would expect the usual 6 ply thickness.

I have seen Lockie 6 plys at 8 gauge (great), 5 gauge, 11 gauge (should have bought it...super heavy) and something like 3 gauge. Yours is a low gauge.
 
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güero

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Lockie can sometimes use a very low gauge count, that would explain why the 6 ply isn't too thick. A high ply count doesn't always mean much. I have seen 12 ply from China look very thin. 12 ply Brunello cucinelli is only medium thick. If l saw that Lockie there is no way l would expect the usual 6 ply thickness.

I have seen Lockie 6 plys at 8 gauge (great), 5 gauge, 11 gauge (should have bought it...super heavy) and something like 3 gauge. Yours is a low gauge.
Exactly, the ply count alone doesn't really give you much information... I think it is mostly a marketing tool, like the S# for suit fabrics.
 

The Shooman

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Exactly, the ply count alone doesn't really give you much information... I think it is mostly a marketing tool, like the S# for suit fabrics.

also, a 12 ply may be knitted from a thinner ply and a low gauge count. I have seen 12 plys that look like 2 ply jumpers. One must be very careful when they look at things online. It is difficult to find good knitwear these days. Even William Lockie looks to be cutting corners making 6 plys with less wool on some jumpers, disappointing.

Here is a Glen Oak. Looks nice and thick, but it uses a lot less wool and is a 3 gauge. I would feel really ripped off if l bought that online.
Glen Oak 6 ply 3 gauge shawl cardigan.jpg

Here is another trick me and others have been eyeing off for 2 years. Looks nice, but it also has low gauge count in many areas, and that is probably why many are not buying it. It is what l call a trap. Made from Alpaca...rare and stunning, but look at the knitting gaps.

Brunello Cucinelli alpaca turtleneck 1.jpg



I also have a Tom Ford turtleneck that looks thick and warm, but it is light and uses half the cashmere with lower gauge. I got conned really good, but it is STUNNING!!!
 

The Shooman

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View attachment 39160

In comparison this appear to be quite more accurate in the finishing: look at those nice armholes.

By the way the McGeorge is defined as a 3-ply whereas the Lockie as a 6-ply, but they look almost identical to me in thickness and gauge: can somebody explain this incongruity?

Those are nice jumpers.


Here we go....a company selling thin holey jumpers as 12 plys. These are the red flag companies...the ones that sell flimsy jumpers as 12 ply and are too ashamed to tell us in what country their jumpers are manufactured in. Of course it would be made in China or Africa or some poor south pacific island country. Speaks volumes about the type of company it is imo. And of course they will sell mediocrity for an arm and a leg because it's all about profits. Forget about quality, and l am sure if you emailed them a question it wouldn't be answered, especially if you asked where the jumper was made. These are the type of companies that float around these days, the address is just a unit, and they see what they can flog to suckers.

Louis 12 ply jumper.jpg
 

florisgreen

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Lockie can sometimes use a very low gauge count, that would explain why the 6 ply isn't too thick. A high ply count doesn't always mean much. I have seen 12 ply from China look very thin. 12 ply Brunello cucinelli is only medium thick. If l saw that Lockie there is no way l would expect the usual 6 ply thickness.

I have seen Lockie 6 plys at 8 gauge (great), 5 gauge, 11 gauge (should have bought it...super heavy) and something like 3 gauge. Yours is a low gauge.
Exactly, the ply count alone doesn't really give you much information... I think it is mostly a marketing tool, like the S# for suit fabrics.
Ultimately, as it seems, the number of plies is not very significant and doesn't tell much about quality.
 

florisgreen

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Here we go....a company selling thin holey jumpers as 12 plys. These are the red flag companies...the ones that sell flimsy jumpers as 12 ply and are too ashamed to tell us in what country their jumpers are manufactured in. Of course it would be made in China or Africa or some poor south pacific island country. Speaks volumes about the type of company it is imo. And of course they will sell mediocrity for an arm and a leg because it's all about profits. Forget about quality, and l am sure if you emailed them a question it wouldn't be answered, especially if you asked where the jumper was made. These are the type of companies that float around these days, the address is just a unit, and they see what they can flog to suckers.
Yes, the web is full of such companies. Sometimes the price could be a good clue as an indicator of quality: at £289 those 12-ply jumpers can hardly be good quality.
 

The Shooman

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Here is Johnstons of Elgin made-in-Scotland. A 12 ply selling for 400 GBP, and not surprising it is so cheap, look how thin it is. Probably using half the cashmere, so half the cost.

If one wants to sell a 12 ply, sell a proper 12 ply and make it THICK. It doesn't speak well for companies who play these games.

Johnston of Elgin 12 ply cashmere.jpg
 

florisgreen

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Here is Johnstons of Elgin made-in-Scotland. A 12 ply selling for 400 GBP, and not surprising it is so cheap, look how thin it is. Probably using half the cashmere, so half the cost.

If one wants to sell a 12 ply, sell a proper 12 ply and make it THICK. It doesn't speak well for companies who play these games.

View attachment 39171
Even such renowned companies, who also produce in Scotland, take part to this game. Sad and blamable.
 

florisgreen

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I also have a Tom Ford turtleneck that looks thick and warm, but it is light and uses half the cashmere with lower gauge. I got conned really good, but it is STUNNING!!!
I've seen nice jumpers in Tom Ford's knitwear, that's made in Italy: do you know who produces it?
 

florisgreen

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Here is another trick me and others have been eyeing off for 2 years. Looks nice, but it also has low gauge count in many areas, and that is probably why many are not buying it. It is what l call a trap. Made from Alpaca...rare and stunning, but look at the knitting gaps.

Brunello Cucinelli alpaca turtleneck 1.jpg
Now I was really eager on this, as I saw it selling by now on eBay, and ready to pull the trigger, as I find it very attractive and being my size.
So greater was my disappointment when I read that some polyamide is mixed with the noble fibres.
As already pointed out, I really don't understand the sense of this.
 

The Shooman

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I've seen nice jumpers in Tom Ford's knitwear, that's made in Italy: do you know who produces it?
could be Harley of Scotland. One of the few Tom Fords not made in Italy
 

florisgreen

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could be Harley of Scotland. One of the few Tom Fords not made in Italy
Actually I meant who is the Italian producer.

Arrived today:

20210629_113253.jpg
20210629_113218.jpg


Pure cashmere, made in Italy, I couldn't resist to this. Lovely details, impeccable finishing.
 
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The Shooman

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florisgreen florisgreen you've been getting all the good styles lately, turtlenecks and shawl cardigans. They are my mainstays in knitwear these days. That cardigan is in the same style as my vintage Dunhill Tailors cardigan...an extremely comfortable piece of knitwear.

l recently bought a vintage Pringle turtleneck and J Press navy shawl cardigan. Might post pics.
 

florisgreen

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florisgreen florisgreen you've been getting all the good styles lately, turtlenecks and shawl cardigans. They are my mainstays in knitwear these days. That cardigan is in the same style as my vintage Dunhill Tailors cardigan...an extremely comfortable piece of knitwear.

l recently bought a vintage Pringle turtleneck and J Press navy shawl cardigan. Might post pics.

In fact I usually wear veeneck jumpers and veeneck cardigans, either with or without sleeves, but was eager to try something else. By the way I like that the shawl collar cardigan has a snug fit, as well as the turtlenecks.
As a young man I wore a lovely green geelong turtleneck by Ballantyne: I wished I had been more aware of its worth and had preserved it. I would pay a high price to get it again or something similar.
 
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Panama

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In fact I usually wear veeneck jumpers and veeneck cardigans, either with or without sleeves, but was eager to try something else. By the way I like that the shawl collar cardigan has a snug fit, as well as the turtlenecks.
As a young man I wore a lovely green turtleneck by Ballantyne: I wished I had been more aware of its worth and had preserved it. I would pay a high price to get it again or something similar.
I lived near the Alan Paine factory shop as a teen/young adult. Whilst most contemporaries wore Burton jumpers, with a few Slazengers and Pringles. I wore Alan Paine made in Wales cashmere and camel jumpers that cost less than the high street. I wish I had looked after them, I probably had 20 to 30. All binned as they got eaten by moths.
 
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The Shooman

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It has been freezing outside during the weekend, icy cold winds too. Been wearing my extra thick boiled wool Austrian jumper and have been as warm as toast. No-one has jumpers as warm as my ones.

Been really enjoying the cold weather. Few like the cold weather because they don't know how to dress for it. All the jumpers sold locally are thin, and lots of plastic coats. Impossible to buy thick trousers unless custom.
 

The Shooman

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I wasn't aware that John Laing is the brand that Barrie uses for its retail. At least that is what is seems to say here: https://www.madeinhawick.com/business/textiles/barrie-knitwear/

Wow, that explains why 4 ply shawl cardigans from John Laing and The Wardrobe were far more expensive than the William Lockie 6 ply. You are paying for quality. Since they are made by Barrie, l wonder if they also use a thicker ply and denser gauge count...wouldn't be surprised because l know they do that for Hermes, and apparently the Barrie home brand also does this. Maybe John Laing does this as well??

4 ply by The Wardrobe = $900.00 USD (immediately below)
12 ply O'cconnells = $1,300 USD


Shawl Cardigan - the wardrobe.jpg

We also have Crompton's 12 ply which looks like a Scott & Charters; it is made in a lower gauge count which explains why Compton's and the Kabbaz it doesn't look as thick as the O'connells 12 ply.
 
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florisgreen

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I wasn't aware that John Laing is the brand that Barrie uses for its retail. At least that is what is seems to say here: https://www.madeinhawick.com/business/textiles/barrie-knitwear/

Me neither, but it's in fact like that. I took a look to the Dunedin website, which sells john Laing, but I'm not really impressed.

For example this cardigan, currently in sale from €414,95 to €172,95.

5051774898183_main01_1800x1800.jpg


A rather modern look and fit, with a high buttoned vee and odd looking cuffs and hem.

Or this jumper, discounted from €327,95 to €136,95.

5051774899128_main01_1800x1800.jpg


I don't see any of the features which are typical of the high end knitwear as double cuffs and drop stitches at the attachment of the collar.
 
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