Cooking Tips, Tricks, Recipes, & Advice

Fwiffo

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What not even subtitles? I passed an Italian O level exam but the video was not much good to me.
Actually that guy has a link in his YouTube videos to a website. You can then have the website translated via Google although sometimes there are slight variations to the written directions and what he does on video.

Stefan Barbato, early Max Mariola videos I have to rely on the few words I know and visuals.
 

Fwiffo

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Finally made khoresh ghormeh sabzi. Saffron rice, pistachio and almond slivers and potato tah deeg.

I am told my barberries were not plump and should have been cooked a bit.

That was a hell of a lot of fine chopping of coriander, parsley, chives and I cheated with dried fenugreek.
 

Kingstonian

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View attachment 35147

Finally made khoresh ghormeh sabzi. Saffron rice, pistachio and almond slivers and potato tah deeg.

I am told my barberries were not plump and should have been cooked a bit.

That was a hell of a lot of fine chopping of coriander, parsley, chives and I cheated with dried fenugreek.
Looks very nice. Cooking is definitely your thing. Is saffron expensive where you are? Fresh coriander etc goes off quickly, so I assume you buy it more or less on the day you will use it.
 

Fwiffo

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Looks very nice. Cooking is definitely your thing. Is saffron expensive where you are? Fresh coriander etc goes off quickly, so I assume you buy it more or less on the day you will use it.
Bad saffron is 3 or 4 quid in a tiny box. But I usually try to get Iranian saffron and luckily besides Los Angeles we have the biggest Persian diaspora so there are more than a few ethnic grocers that carry them. It's expensive but how it reacts when you grind it with a mortar and pestle is a telling difference.

For my weekend family meals I buy ingredients same day from the market, and cook the same or next day. I usually wash the herbs and put the stems in water to nurture it. If I leave them dry in the fridge they brown/black easily. I really hate supermarkets that keep blasting their herbs every 20 minutes with water. Lately I have a pot on my balcony with green onions, basil and curly parsley. I used some of the latter for this dish. You fry the herbs first in oil and then add it to the stew. So many herbs frying together..the profumo was divine.

I'm flattered and humbled by the comment on my cooking. I'm still an amateur with horrible knife skills and I believe some other esteemed members of this forum do better, but they don't necessarily advertise it. As they say in Farsi, kheili mamnoon - much appreciated.
 

Fwiffo

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Been on a bit of a French streak but I think I will give it up soon because my knife skills mean I chop rustic and can't make proper mirepoix and other French shapes.

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Duck l'orange with hasselback potatoes and root vegetables

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Crab salad on avocado with a potato latke top

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Julia Child beef bourguignon with a sliced potato stack

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Blanquette de veau with potato sticks
 

Rambo

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Been on a bit of a French streak but I think I will give it up soon because my knife skills mean I chop rustic and can't make proper mirepoix and other French shapes.

View attachment 35321

Duck l'orange with hasselback potatoes and root vegetables

View attachment 35322

Crab salad on avocado with a potato latke top

View attachment 35323

Julia Child beef bourguignon with a sliced potato stack

View attachment 35324

Blanquette de veau with potato sticks
This all looks fantastic
 

Journeyman

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Been on a bit of a French streak but I think I will give it up soon because my knife skills mean I chop rustic and can't make proper mirepoix and other French shapes.
Frankly, Fwiff, I think that you protest too much! Your cooking looks far better than most people who aren't actually trained chefs.
 

Fwiffo

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Missed one. Fish quenelle with a lobster sauce. I cheated and used an oriental spoon for quenelle but the lobster sauce consumed a whole half kilo lobster meat.
 

Fwiffo

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Frankly, Fwiff, I think that you protest too much! Your cooking looks far better than most people who aren't actually trained chefs.
Given I don't have a second warming oven, heat lamps, squirt bottles, and tweezers - I would say it's a challenge.

But it appeals to me like work appeals to me. Lots of logistics organisation to get to the end goal and then in the middle of it something doesn't go your way so you have to adjust. It's like paramedics addicted to the adrenaline of being a first responder to an incident.
 

Fwiffo

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Surely that is just a presentation issue? Carrots still taste the same diced, sliced or in batons.
Yes. It's more refined. Chips cut into perfect rectangles.

What to do with the waste is another thing. Italians are good for using everything.

I assume you have decent sharp knives ? Those little French Opinel knives will cut as fine as you want and they are cheap too.
I do but it's more my fear of slicing myself. I could wear a chain mail glove but that wouldn't give me much dexterity.

If it says preparation time 20 minutes you can add at least 50 percent because of how slow I cut up onions, mince garlic, etc. I don't own any kitchen gadgets so I do everything from scratch.
 

Dropbear

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I got a $20 Webber chimney from the hardware store and I definitely wish I’d known about this shit years ago!
 
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Fwiffo

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I made a fettucine alfredo with this expensive dried egg pasta I bought for $8.90.

Apparently it was a hit. It's definitely a different texture than the Italian grocery store offerings I have down the street from me.

For the record I did not purchase the funghi one here, I bought the plain one.

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QuandoDio

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Been on a bit of a French streak but I think I will give it up soon because my knife skills mean I chop rustic and can't make proper mirepoix and other French shapes.

View attachment 35321

Duck l'orange with hasselback potatoes and root vegetables

View attachment 35322

Crab salad on avocado with a potato latke top

View attachment 35323

Julia Child beef bourguignon with a sliced potato stack

View attachment 35324

Blanquette de veau with potato sticks

Nice, but as you know mirepoix is not a 'French shape';).

Even with better knife skills, it can all be a faff. I have OK nice skills, trained etc but I cut myself badly on my index and middle finger a month ago, when hosting at home and serving multi-courses.

Usually, I find a mandoline to be easier and neater and a big help for those shapes. At the very least, it makes making French fries a breeze.
 

QuandoDio

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Yes. It's more refined. Chips cut into perfect rectangles.

What to do with the waste is another thing. Italians are good for using everything.



I do but it's more my fear of slicing myself. I could wear a chain mail glove but that wouldn't give me much dexterity.

If it says preparation time 20 minutes you can add at least 50 percent because of how slow I cut up onions, mince garlic, etc. I don't own any kitchen gadgets so I do everything from scratch.
French don't really waste. Those 'less-pretty' sides are for the dogs/ the chef's perk. As many of Julia's Childs works will tell you.

And the French preached and practised the 'nose-to-tail' eating of animals before it become fashionable.
 

Journeyman

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And the French preached and practised the 'nose-to-tail' eating of animals before it become fashionable.
Heck, just about everywhere used to do "nose-to-tail" eating back when there was less pre-prepared food and people were less well-off in what are now developed countries.

My dad grew up in a very working-class household in pre-WWII London. They used to eat the offcuts, offal and so on, because that was what they could afford.

When I was young, my dad would cook tripe in a pot on the stove. I thought that it looked disgusting.

We also had a tongue press in the cupboard. Dad would buy ox tongue from the butcher and use the tongue press to flatten it down. I always hated it as a child when I'd open the fridge door and see a large tongue sitting there on a plate.

I can't really imagine anyone doing that kind of thing here anymore unless they're really into "artisanal" cooking. No-one else would bother and they'd think that there are far better things to cook.

Having said that, when I was young, the family of one of my friends had a pig. While I was visiting one day they shot it and his mother minced up some of the meat and then, using the pig's own intestines, she made pork sausages. Thirty-five years later, and I've yet to eat a better sausage.
 

QuandoDio

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Heck, just about everywhere used to do "nose-to-tail" eating back when there was less pre-prepared food and people were less well-off in what are now developed countries.

My dad grew up in a very working-class household in pre-WWII London. They used to eat the offcuts, offal and so on, because that was what they could afford.

When I was young, my dad would cook tripe in a pot on the stove. I thought that it looked disgusting.

We also had a tongue press in the cupboard. Dad would buy ox tongue from the butcher and use the tongue press to flatten it down. I always hated it as a child when I'd open the fridge door and see a large tongue sitting there on a plate.

I can't really imagine anyone doing that kind of thing here anymore unless they're really into "artisanal" cooking. No-one else would bother and they'd think that there are far better things to cook.

Having said that, when I was young, the family of one of my friends had a pig. While I was visiting one day they shot it and his mother minced up some of the meat and then, using the pig's own intestines, she made pork sausages. Thirty-five years later, and I've yet to eat a better sausage.
All true. Older generations all ate that way but I mean the French regularly applied it to fancier cooking techniques and still do.

Baby boomers and younger only know a few cuts of meat and have a very restricted palate which is a shame. Like you say, it is now 'artisanal'. Meanwhile, it was just the way it was done, nothing fancy about it.
 
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