Good Articles That Don't Deserve Their Own Threads

formby002

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424
Looks about right to me, although I'm not sure about the decimal places.

Also, don't forget that the speed of sound changes depending on altitude/air temperature.
That's why its wrong.

At that altitude Mach 1 is about 660mph, at around sea level 760mph.
 
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ballmouse

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Very good(lengthy) read:

So rather than expect the system to work correctly, you have to dedicate 20 years of your life hounding policemen, DNA experts, judges, and every other official to get a murder in a small town correctly solved. Kafka would kill himself after 1 month if he were alive now.
 

Journeyman

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^Not surprising at all, unfortunately.

The cost of re-listing these items, including repackaging etc, is more than the potential profit and so, ironically, it's cheaper to throw them out rather than relisting.
 

Fwiffo

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^Not surprising at all, unfortunately.

The cost of re-listing these items, including repackaging etc, is more than the potential profit and so, ironically, it's cheaper to throw them out rather than relisting.
Capitalism at its finest.
 

sirloin

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Came across this interview from 2015 with Bruno Cucinelli.
 

Dropbear

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^Not surprising at all, unfortunately.

The cost of re-listing these items, including repackaging etc, is more than the potential profit and so, ironically, it's cheaper to throw them out rather than relisting.
Wirh such a generous free return policy here, standard practice for many people when something breaks (even if it is after several years) is to just order a new one from Amazon, switch it with the broken item and then return it for a refund. New for old replacement at no cost.
 

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
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Thruth Thruth whats this situation all about?
Strife between non-indigenous and First Nations fishermen. There is a lobster season and quotas. The First Nations can do a deal directly with Ottawa to create their own fishery that can run outside of the regular season because of treaty rights and a 1995 Supreme Court ruling that they can operate a commercial fishery to make "a modest living".

White fishermen don't like that and the dispute has escalated to them burning down the lobster pound being used by the indigenous fishermen.
 

Fwiffo

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19 year war. An 18 year old soldier deployed here wasn’t even born during Sept 11th. Substitute Taliban for Viet Cong and it sounds like the Vietnam war.

“Nineteen years on, after the deaths of more than 3,500 coalition forces and more than 110,000 Afghans killed, the overriding concern is averting a chaotic conclusion - at worst another descent into civil war - as the countdown gathers pace for the gradual removal of the last US and Nato forces in Afghanistan.”

“The Taliban, now at their greatest strength since 2001, are advancing and attacking in districts across Afghanistan - despite a deal signed with the US in February which seemed to promise a respite to a nation exhausted by war and increasingly worried it will only get worse.

Outside this magnificent 19th Century Arg fortress, bolstered by ancient stone walls and now successive rings of steel, nerves are jangling across Afghanistan amid reports of Taliban fighters stealthily encroaching on key towns and cities, including Kabul itself.

Gen Miller's mission this week to the western province of Farah, like his recent stop at the Afghan army base in the walled Qala-i-Jangi fortress in the northern province of Balkh, was part of intensifying efforts to signal continuing US support to beleaguered Afghan forces - even when the clock is ticking and there's a cascade of conflicting statements from Washington over the timing of the pull-out.

The details are different in each province's tally on its security score card but the direction and dangers are much the same: Afghan security forces including special forces inflicting defeat and casualties in some battles; losing ground in others; and gratitude for continuing US air support which has made the difference, time and again, in denying Taliban fighters the prize of a provincial capital.

’We're surrounded,‘ was the plea for help in Farah to an American general who kept consulting the map of districts where main roads are off limits to Afghan government forces, and pressure mounts on supply lines.

US airpower, one of the most powerful weapons in its Afghan arsenal, turned the tide again this month when Taliban fighters, testing Afghan strength, and US resolve, went on the offensive in the strategic southern province of Helmand and overran government check-posts in its main city of Lashkar Gah.

But, with every month that passes, there are also signs on the ground that the mighty US Army is finally packing up.

In Bagram, a bustling hive of a town which mushroomed over the years alongside the US's biggest military base, there's a constant clatter of helicopters and hulking military transport planes as US hardware is ferried out. The fate of this vast compound is still uncertain but a shifting perimeter fence has already retreated by a distance of several football pitches.”
 
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