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I'm firing one of the heads of one of my departments. It's the first person I'm firing myself in this company who didn't leave or had to leave because we ran out of money on a project. I can't remember every single person I sent packing anymore but this is the 5th team in 3 countries and by my standards of turning over 40 to 50 percent of the staff before the operation is fixed I am quite behind at more than 7 months on the job.

This is the first piece of a series of dominoes. I've always been characterized and described as a heartless corporate bastard but my patience has worn thin and even though I'm planning for the XXth immediate walk out the door termination it is something that weighs on me every time I make this type of decision.
If you tried that tactic over here, you'd be the one getting sacked.

In the dynamic job market of the EU zone a staff position trumps everything. A golden ticket for organisational abuse. You have zero chance of getting rid without resorting to expensive lawyers looking to maximize their hourly costs on the ''negotiation'' ticket - what's a couple of hundred thousand here or there? - or you may get lucky with the help of the Ethics Committee.
 

Fwiffo

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If you tried that tactic over here, you'd be the one getting sacked.

In the dynamic job market of the EU zone a staff position trumps everything. A golden ticket for organisational abuse. You have zero chance of getting rid without resorting to expensive lawyers looking to maximize their hourly costs on the ''negotiation'' ticket - what's a couple of hundred thousand here or there? - or you may get lucky with the help of the Ethics Committee.
We made a number of the staff redundant when I was in London. One funny part was when they challenged it the wanker brought his mother in to give a testimonial. I left after 18 months so I didn't know the repercussions.
 
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We made a number of the staff redundant when I was in London. One funny part was when they challenged it the wanker brought his mother in to give a testimonial. I left after 18 months so I didn't know the repercussions.
That kind of stunt wouldn't have washed in the old England before the EU got hold of the employment laws. No one would have dared.

An associate of mine here, when announced he was going through the redundancy process, played them and won on the ticket that he would never work again on account he held no university, college, or technical qualification and couldn't speak Dutch and so, he would be completely unemployable in the Dutch job market. He's still there working or pretending to work.
 

Fwiffo

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That kind of stunt wouldn't have washed in the old England before the EU got hold of the employment laws. No one would have dared.

An associate of mine here, when announced he was going through the redundancy process, played them and won on the ticket that he would never work again on account he held no university, college, or technical qualification and couldn't speak Dutch and so, he would be completely unemployable in the Dutch job market. He's still there working or pretending to work.
You keep bringing cases of these people up. Honestly if someone paid me what they paid me now to pretend to work because I got banished into corporate exile I would simply quit. I'd go mental. My father spoke of a director who was transferred to a department of no one and given a secretary ages ago. This was the part of the company you were sent to when you were put out to pasture. He hung on for a year or two doing bugger all. It reminds me a bit of where Roger Sterling ended up in Mad Men; the floor of geriatric executives.

Even if you were to live through some period of this purgatory you emerge out of it less fit and able to compete in the workforce so what's the point except you earned some easy cash.
 
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You keep bringing cases of these people up. Honestly if someone paid me what they paid me now to pretend to work because I got banished into corporate exile I would simply quit. I'd go mental. My father spoke of a director who was transferred to a department of no one and given a secretary ages ago. This was the part of the company you were sent to when you were put out to pasture. He hung on for a year or two doing bugger all. It reminds me a bit of where Roger Sterling ended up in Mad Men; the floor of geriatric executives.

Even if you were to live through some period of this purgatory you emerge out of it less fit and able to compete in the workforce so what's the point except you earned some easy cash.
But these people I bring up are not point men, or possessed by a sense of urgency to get ahead or pride in their profession. These are the plodders and do the bare minimums who fit-in to the corporate scheme to allow others to leap-frog ahead of them. They expect to rewarded in any case. Under certain processes and protected by being staff and legislation they can in the end hold more sway and power than the able.
 
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