This Week In News That Makes You Doubt Your Committment To Humanity

Scherensammler

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Oh for fuck sakes. He said "actor" so he must mean "crisis" actors, right?

Yup. Proof positive. Another false flag attack.
I don't think that speaker would be at a level high enough to be in the know.
However, it seems the MSM cannot spin this as Trump's fault and the shooter wasn't a supporter of Trump.
Which might explain why the story hasn't been blown up like the fake bombs or the migrant caravan.
No big headlines on German globalist websites and the BBC, usually at the forefront of Anti_Trump "news" is more on about the helicopter crash that killed the Leicester football club owner, among others.
 

Rambo

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https://www.propublica.org/article/...erous-apartments-with-rats-roaches-toxic-mold

“Pretty Much a Failure”: HUD Inspections Pass Dangerous Apartments Filled With Rats, Roaches and Toxic Mold
The system for inspecting federally subsidized properties is failing low-income families, seniors and people with disabilities and undermining the agency’s oversight, The Southern Illinoisan and ProPublica have found.
 

Rambo

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/...-man-plays-video-games-day-says-eat-dies.html

'I will eat till I die': 700LB man, 34, who has to bathe in an outdoor TROUGH 'like a pig' reveals he spends all day playing video games NAKED while relying on his dad to take care of him
  • Casey King from Georgia is sharing his story on the new season of the TLC reality series Family by the Ton, a spinoff of the TLC reality series My 600-lb Life
  • On Wednesday night's premiere, he revealed he is unemployed and living with his father, Danny, who waits on him hand and foot
  • Casey has to bathe in a large metal trough outside, and he relies on his father to help him clean himself and wipe his behind after he goes to the bathroom
  • He said he normally wakes up at noon, eats, and then spends the rest of the day watching TV and playing videos games
  • Casey admitted that he sits in his room naked with the door closed because his clothes are restricting
 

Rambo

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https://ig.ft.com/india-pollution/

Dirty air: how India became the most polluted country on earth
With the situation worse than it ever was in neighbouring China the Modi government is struggling to introduce measures to combat the problem

-the chart is the kicker here. look at how much of the world is breathing polluted air.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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https://ig.ft.com/india-pollution/

Dirty air: how India became the most polluted country on earth
With the situation worse than it ever was in neighbouring China the Modi government is struggling to introduce measures to combat the problem

-the chart is the kicker here. look at how much of the world is breathing polluted air.
Can well believe that, the only country I've ever been to that stinks of raw sewage constantly outside of the air conditioned prison of your 5 star hotel at 5 star prices. Some colleagues have been going to some of the industrial cities and they've confirmed it's worse than Beijing. And that's something very bad indeed.
 

Journeyman

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^ That sort of ridiculous, overly-patriotic response reminds me of the morons who were furious because footballers were kneeling during the US national anthem and, by doing so, they were apparently "disrespecting the military".

Whenever I read about that, I always thought, "Huh?".

Just because you don't stand to attention with your hand on your chest weeping about great the USA is when the national anthem plays, doesn't mean that you don't respect people who serve in the armed forces. They are two entirely different things and I have no idea how some people manage to conflate the two.
 

Rambo

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/uon-cpi030119.php

Chemical pollutants in the home degrade fertility in both men and dogs, study finds
University of Nottingham

New research by scientists at the University of Nottingham suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs.

There has been increasing concern over declining human male fertility in recent decades with studies showing a 50% global reduction in sperm quality in the past 80 years. A previous study by the Nottingham experts showed that sperm quality in domestic dogs has also sharply declined, raising the question of whether modern day chemicals in the home environment could be at least partly to blame.

In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, the Nottingham team set out to test the effects of two specific man-made chemicals namely the common plasticizer DEHP, widely abundant in the home (e.g. carpets, flooring, upholstery, clothes, wires, toys) and the persistent industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153, which although banned globally, remains widely detectable in the environment including food.

The researchers carried out identical experiments in both species using samples of sperm from donor men and stud dogs living in the same region of the UK. The results show that the chemicals, at concentrations relevant to environmental exposure, have the same damaging effect on sperm from both man and dog.

Leading the work, Associate Professor and Reader in Reproductive Biology at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, Richard Lea, said: "This new study supports our theory that the domestic dog is indeed a 'sentinel' or mirror for human male reproductive decline and our findings suggest that man-made chemicals that have been widely used in the home and working environment may be responsible for the fall in sperm quality reported in both man and dog that share the same environment."

"Our previous study in dogs showed that the chemical pollutants found in the sperm of adult dogs, and in some pet foods, had a detrimental effect on sperm function at the concentrations previously found in the male reproductive tract. This new study is the first to test the effect of two known environmental contaminants, DEHP and PCB153, on both dog and human sperm in vitro, in the same concentrations as found in vivo.

Rebecca Sumner, who carried out the experimental work as part of her PhD, said "In both cases and in both subjects, the effect was reduced sperm motility and increased fragmentation of DNA.
Dr Sumner added: "We know that when human sperm motility is poor, DNA fragmentation is increased and that human male infertility is linked to increased levels of DNA damage in sperm. We now believe this is the same in pet dogs because they live in the same domestic environment and are exposed to the same household contaminants. This means that dogs may be an effective model for future research into the effects of pollutants on declining fertility, particularly because external influences such as diet are more easily controlled than in humans."

Professor Gary England, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science and Professor of Comparative Veterinary Reproduction said: "Since environmental pollutants largely reflect a Western way of life such as the effects of industry, the chemicals present in the environment are likely to depend on the location. An important area of future study is to determine how the region in which we live may effect sperm quality in both man and dog."
 

Fwiffo

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Where is Pimpernel Smith Pimpernel Smith on this? He's always harping on that meritocracy train
What I don't get is how USC ranks academically. If you can't get into a state school that from what I know is known for collegiate sports - do you have any business being in university?

I can imagine people bribing to get athletic scholarships into Harvard.
 

Journeyman

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What I don't get is how USC ranks academically. If you can't get into a state school that from what I know is known for collegiate sports - do you have any business being in university?
USC isn't a state college - it's private. It's separate from the UC (University of California) system.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Where is Pimpernel Smith Pimpernel Smith on this? He's always harping on that meritocracy train
Pretty diabolical scheme.

What I don't get is how USC ranks academically. If you can't get into a state school that from what I know is known for collegiate sports - do you have any business being in university?

I can imagine people bribing to get athletic scholarships into Harvard.
Clearly these kids are lacking in academic prowess and are not suited to the intellectual rigours of university. Neither are they sporty in seems. These kids would be better getting a job at 18, no matter how distasteful that is for the parents.
 

Fwiffo

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Pretty diabolical scheme.
Clearly these kids are lacking in academic prowess and are not suited to the intellectual rigours of university. Neither are they sporty in seems. These kids would be better getting a job at 18, no matter how distasteful that is for the parents.
Getting a job? As YouTube celebrity?
 

Rambo

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in case you haven't seen it, do yourselves a favor and don't watch the livestream footage of the NZ mosque shooter.
 

InstaHate

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https://thepointsguy.com/news/ice-detains-flight-attendant-daca/

On one hand, I try very hard to ignore anecdotes and my personal experiences when thinking about policy. They just pollute clear thinking.

On the other hand, this is the second person I know personally whose DACA spouse has been detained for a long period of time. The wife of one of my students was detained for two months despite being married to an American citizen, but they had just gotten married (which makes it feel slightly less egregious).

The woman in the article is married to my high school best friend, and they’ve been married for several years. They’d already applied for citizenship.

I do think our immigration system is broken (for reasons consonant with the Right and the Left), and I do support a path to citizenship for Dreamers. But I feel the proximity of this pushing me towards more radical views. We’re supposed to get more conservative as we get older, but I’m seeing myself get more liberal. doghouse doghouse
 

Pimpernel Smith

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https://thepointsguy.com/news/ice-detains-flight-attendant-daca/

On one hand, I try very hard to ignore anecdotes and my personal experiences when thinking about policy. They just pollute clear thinking.

On the other hand, this is the second person I know personally whose DACA spouse has been detained for a long period of time. The wife of one of my students was detained for two months despite being married to an American citizen, but they had just gotten married (which makes it feel slightly less egregious).

The woman in the article is married to my high school best friend, and they’ve been married for several years. They’d already applied for citizenship.

I do think our immigration system is broken (for reasons consonant with the Right and the Left), and I do support a path to citizenship for Dreamers. But I feel the proximity of this pushing me towards more radical views. We’re supposed to get more conservative as we get older, but I’m seeing myself get more liberal. doghouse doghouse
Anecdotal evidence should not necessarily be ruled out.

When it comes to procedures to attain citizenship you can't take a chance and buck the system. No matter how legitimate your case seems to be. Rigid procedures and bureaucracies exist to put the individual into a Kafkaesque or Catch 22 state of being. A couple of colleagues have gained American citizenship and one is trying emigrate there now, but not by a work transfer and the system is tough, lengthy and detailed.

I have an Iranian consultant I use in Sweden who is in the process to attain citizenship. He's not allowed to work outside Sweden at this stage of the procedure. So he's had to turn down work because of this. I was contacted by Swedish immigration people and they wanted to know what work he had done for me and where. They then asked if all this work was in Sweden, why did the contract I have with him state the region of coverage was Europe and not specifically Sweden.
 

InstaHate

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Anecdotal evidence and personal experience can and should inspire more rigorous exploration of a phenomena, but it should not be used for any form of generalization.

Politicians of all ilk use anecdotal evidence to take advantage of our bounded rationality and various heuristics. Anecdotal evidence used for persuasive purposes is an effective way to sway an audience or win a debate, but it appeals to our lowest common denominator and is often wielded with little regard—or blatant disregard—for more accurate and more objective approaches to presenting relevant information.

Hard data certainly has its own biases and risks, and it should always be treated critically. Furthermore, its only human that we trust our eyes over numbers. But, as Rambo Rambo used to exhort me to be more cutting and blunt, I’ll say this: the more a person is swayed by anecdotes and personal experience when faced with conflicting information that is much more representative, objective, and rigorously presented, the stupider I think they are.

And we are all guilty of this. It’s just a matter of degree.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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Never, ever deny your own experience. There's an academic discipline devoted to it i.e. phenomenology. Also anthropology and my own niche field, reverse-anthropology.
 

Scherensammler

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Why don't feminists travel to Africa? It's such a great place for true activism. Genital mutulation and then this:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-47695169

The practice involves ironing a girl's chest with hot objects to delay breasts from growing, so she does not attract male attention.
What does that say about the Sub-Saharan African males (that get shovelled into Europe)?
 

Journeyman

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the US supreme court just legalized torture.
The execution decision?

I haven't read much about it, but I did see where one or more conservative judges (Gorsuch, perhaps?) noted that hanging used to be commonplace and often did not work perfectly, which is true - either the rope was too short or the knot wasn't in the best position, so the person choked slowly, or the rope was too long and their head would literally be pulled off their body.

The point he seemed to miss, though, is that in general we like to think that we've moved on as a society since those times and that we're better now, which is precisely why we *don't* hang people any more - precisely because it often didn't work perfectly and caused pain and so on.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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The execution decision?

I haven't read much about it, but I did see where one or more conservative judges (Gorsuch, perhaps?) noted that hanging used to be commonplace and often did not work perfectly, which is true - either the rope was too short or the knot wasn't in the best position, so the person choked slowly, or the rope was too long and their head would literally be pulled off their body.

The point he seemed to miss, though, is that in general we like to think that we've moved on as a society since those times and that we're better now, which is precisely why we *don't* hang people any more - precisely because it often didn't work perfectly and caused pain and so on.
If you had read Albert Pierrepoint's (UK's lead executioner 1940-56) autobiography, you would know that the method of hanging in the USA with the knot used was a problem and led often to strangulation. The UK's system was more efficient delivering an instant broken neck every time, this from Wiki, also note only 12 seconds from leaving cell to opening the trap door:

QUOTE
He followed the routine as established by Home Office guidelines, and as followed by his predecessors. He and his assistant arrived the day before the execution, where he was told the height and weight of the prisoner; he viewed the condemned man through the "Judas hole" in the door to judge his build. Pierrepoint then went to the execution room—normally next to the condemned cell—where he tested the equipment using a sack that weighed about the same as the prisoner; he calculated the length of the drop using the Home Office Table of Drops, making allowances for the man's physique, if necessary. He left the weighted sack hanging on the rope to ensure the rope was stretched and it would be re-adjusted in the morning if necessary.

On the day of the execution, the practice was for Pierrepoint, his assistant and two prison officers to enter the condemned man's cell at 8:00 am. Pierrepoint secured the man's arms behind his back with a leather strap, and all five walked through a second door, which led to the execution chamber. The prisoner was walked to a marked spot on the trapdoor whereupon Pierrepoint placed a white hood over the prisoner's head and a noose around his neck. The metal eye through which the rope was looped was placed under the left jawbone which, when the prisoner dropped, forced the head back and broke the spine. Pierrepoint pulled a large lever, releasing the trapdoor. From entering the condemned man's cell to opening the trapdoor took him a maximum of 12 seconds. The neck was broken in almost exactly the same position in each hanging—the Hangman's fracture.


X-ray of the cervical spine with a Hangman's fracture. Left without annotation, right with. The C2 (red outline) is moved forward with respect to C3
UNQOUTE
 

Rambo

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The execution decision?

I haven't read much about it, but I did see where one or more conservative judges (Gorsuch, perhaps?) noted that hanging used to be commonplace and often did not work perfectly, which is true - either the rope was too short or the knot wasn't in the best position, so the person choked slowly, or the rope was too long and their head would literally be pulled off their body.

The point he seemed to miss, though, is that in general we like to think that we've moved on as a society since those times and that we're better now, which is precisely why we *don't* hang people any more - precisely because it often didn't work perfectly and caused pain and so on.
yes the execution decision. this is a lot of extra words for what is a very simple premise - don't kill people. and if you are going to, at least have the decency to make it quick. we are barbaric.
If you had read Albert Pierrepoint's (UK's lead executioner 1940-56) autobiography, you would know that the method of hanging in the USA with the knot used was a problem and led often to strangulation. The UK's system was more efficient delivering an instant broken neck every time, this from Wiki, also note only 12 seconds from leaving cell to opening the trap door:

QUOTE
He followed the routine as established by Home Office guidelines, and as followed by his predecessors. He and his assistant arrived the day before the execution, where he was told the height and weight of the prisoner; he viewed the condemned man through the "Judas hole" in the door to judge his build. Pierrepoint then went to the execution room—normally next to the condemned cell—where he tested the equipment using a sack that weighed about the same as the prisoner; he calculated the length of the drop using the Home Office Table of Drops, making allowances for the man's physique, if necessary. He left the weighted sack hanging on the rope to ensure the rope was stretched and it would be re-adjusted in the morning if necessary.

On the day of the execution, the practice was for Pierrepoint, his assistant and two prison officers to enter the condemned man's cell at 8:00 am. Pierrepoint secured the man's arms behind his back with a leather strap, and all five walked through a second door, which led to the execution chamber. The prisoner was walked to a marked spot on the trapdoor whereupon Pierrepoint placed a white hood over the prisoner's head and a noose around his neck. The metal eye through which the rope was looped was placed under the left jawbone which, when the prisoner dropped, forced the head back and broke the spine. Pierrepoint pulled a large lever, releasing the trapdoor. From entering the condemned man's cell to opening the trapdoor took him a maximum of 12 seconds. The neck was broken in almost exactly the same position in each hanging—the Hangman's fracture.


X-ray of the cervical spine with a Hangman's fracture. Left without annotation, right with. The C2 (red outline) is moved forward with respect to C3
UNQOUTE
just shoot them in the head.
 

Pimpernel Smith

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yes the execution decision. this is a lot of extra words for what is a very simple premise - don't kill people. and if you are going to, at least have the decency to make it quick. we are barbaric.

just shoot them in the head.
But that proves rather messy and is bad for moral. The drop when carried out by a master executioner, such as Pierrepoint is the way to go. Quick and clean with no excess waiting time.
 
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