Ask A Quick Question

fxh

OG Party Suit Wearer
Supporter
Messages
6,464
I take it it’s the same for sleeve length? Some gents cover their cuffs, others don’t?
Sleeve length isn’t that important if you get cuff width right to stop at wrist. That’s easy to do by simply shifting the button.

Sadly these days there’s a lot of confusion about shirts. They used to be considered underwear - that gives you some idea about design. And they were always, always tucked in. That means long tails. Nowadays they are basically outerwear, but designed partly as underwear and to be tucked in and outerwear to be untucked. But not well designed to be either. Add to this the fashion to wear them tight, tight and tighter.

So most RTW look like shit.
 

yeahokaywhatever

Active Member
Messages
43
Sleeve length isn’t that important if you get cuff width right to stop at wrist. That’s easy to do by simply shifting the button.


Can you elaborate on “shifting the button”?

Can you also explain why it’s “not important”?

Was just curious because I’ve seen gents with their jacket sleeves right over their shirt cuffs. I had a suspicion that they were underwear-like garments, but I think many reveal a little cuff if they’re not French cuffs, some don’t hmm
 
Last edited:

Mattrick

Active Member
Messages
34
I'm guessing he means that having a cuff that fits and prevents the sleeve from dropping too far down over your hands can make up for a slight excess of length. And the cuff button can be moved slightly to make the cuff fit better.

I think you were talking about whether to show shirt cuff beneath your jacket sleeve. That's a matter of taste, but I think it looks a lot better if you do. It adds a slither of contrast that is visually pleasing. Best to look at photos of men who are unquestionably well-dressed and see what they do and decide what you like.
 

Untermensch

Well-Known Member
Messages
244
I take it it’s the same for sleeve length? Some gents cover their cuffs, others don’t?
The rule of thumb says you should show between 1/2 and 1/8th of an inch of cuff. But it's a matter of taste, really.

With a country coat, you would traditionally show less cuff, or none at all, to protect the cuff from dirt etc. But times have changed, and once again, it's a matter of taste.

The golden rule of menswear is that you need to be quite simply a man in his clothes, not a model for the clothes, or a godawful "gentleman" in the modern sense, or showing off the clothes, or fussing about "design" (that's you, Crompers) or even perfect fit (which doesn't exist).
 

Lobbster

Well-Known Member
Messages
82
Do any of the North American users on here have some experience with Filson Clothing and their sizing? I'd apreciate some feedback.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
2,751
Do any of the North American users on here have some experience with Filson Clothing and their sizing? I'd apreciate some feedback.
I can only speak to the Mackinaw jacket, which is cut roomy - it’s outdoor workwear. Avoid anything “Seattle Fit”, which was a trendy slim fit line about 10-15 years ago - but not slim as in good for slim/athletic built men. Slim as in hipster fit.
 

Untermensch

Well-Known Member
Messages
244
What does "design" even mean when Crompton (and you) use it?
As God is my witness, I don't know. The only "design" in men's tailoring in the last 100 years was Tommy Nutter, and that was only worn by talentless pricks like the Beatles or cokeheads like Mick Jagger.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
28,557
Do any of the North American users on here have some experience with Filson Clothing and their sizing? I'd apreciate some feedback.
Fairly standard american sizing ime. Ive got a few of their outerwear pieces and theyre all just about normal. Maybe a touch smaller but only by a very tiny bit.
 

Lobbster

Well-Known Member
Messages
82
Thanks for your replies.

Would you say the Mackinaw is sort of menswear compatible?

So say I take a 58 in Italian or a 56 in German a XXL would be fine?

I'm currently looking alternatives to Barbour and have always had an eye on Filson, the tin cloth field jacket and the cover cloth mile marker coat in particular but the question is if these work outside an Americana/workwear context.
 

Dropbear

Member in Good Standing
Messages
2,751
Personally, I wouldn’t wear the Makinaw with tailoring. It is pretty rugged, but I have seen other Filson jackets that would work a bit better inside the city.

Part of the reason I think you could get away with it in Europe is because it’s a style less seen there. Around here, everyone and his dog has some sort of Filson-style cowboy barn coat (Brokeback Mountain Jackets, as I call them). Hence my love for Barbour in this environment- something I probably wouldn’t be caught dead in if I were in the UK.

Thruth should be able to steer you towards good Filson tincloth outerwear.
 

Rambo

The Trollest Of Trolls
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
28,557
Thanks for your replies.

Would you say the Mackinaw is sort of menswear compatible?

So say I take a 58 in Italian or a 56 in German a XXL would be fine?

I'm currently looking alternatives to Barbour and have always had an eye on Filson, the tin cloth field jacket and the cover cloth mile marker coat in particular but the question is if these work outside an Americana/workwear context.
Yes
 

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
19,380
Thanks for your replies.

Would you say the Mackinaw is sort of menswear compatible?

So say I take a 58 in Italian or a 56 in German a XXL would be fine?

I'm currently looking alternatives to Barbour and have always had an eye on Filson, the tin cloth field jacket and the cover cloth mile marker coat in particular but the question is if these work outside an Americana/workwear context.
The single Mac fits solidly in the streetwear & denim workwear niche, which is why Filson created the Seattle fit for iGents and neckbeard lumbersexuals who would have to size down sometimes 2 sizes to get their "fit" dialled in because they don't use it over multiple layers. Seattle fit is more tapered through the body, especially the waist.

The Alaska fit is built to accommodate multiple layers because they are needed for cold weather. Even though it is relatively heavy wool, a 24 or 26 oz wool overcoat is really not that warm relatively speaking.

I've always sized down 1 size with the single Mac and go TTS in the double Mac. The double is actually slimmer than the single Mac in the Alaska fit from a chest tolerance perspective. Or maybe I should say less large.

I actually dislike the design of the single Mac compared to the double Mac, mainly because of the pocket orientation.

Single Mac. Don't like the 4 pocket array although the back is pretty clean except for the map pocket dual entry pockets on the back

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.13.50 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.16.20 PM.png


Double Mac. I find that the double layer of cape over the front gives a cleaner look hiding the full upper pockets under the cape. I also think the cape over the back looks better. Problem is it is a heavy behemoth of a jacket that - despite it being used by hunters and loggers - really needs layers beneath to be truly warm.

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.26.06 PM.png
Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.26.18 PM.png


I think an alternative if you want a wool filson coat that combines the best of both the Mac and double Mac is the Cape Coat. You get a cape over the front and back but not the double sleeves that come with the double Mac. You also have side entry, handwarmer lower pockets instead of flaps. Plus you have a clean back with the cape treatment and no map pockets flaps.

The unlined Cape coat is the same 24 oz/square yd in solid colours as the single Mac and both use 26 oz for the plaid. The Cape is warmer. You can also get it lined in a sherpa lining with Primaloft Gold synthetic insulation but with a 21 ounce wool, making it warmer than the single Mac for sure. Have no first hand comparison to the double Mac but I'd say it may be as warm.

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.14.55 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-10-28 at 7.15.04 PM.png
 

Thruth

thicker but more pliant than horsehide
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
19,380
Personally, I wouldn’t wear the Makinaw with tailoring. It is pretty rugged, but I have seen other Filson jackets that would work a bit better inside the city.

Part of the reason I think you could get away with it in Europe is because it’s a style less seen there. Around here, everyone and his dog has some sort of Filson-style cowboy barn coat (Brokeback Mountain Jackets, as I call them). Hence my love for Barbour in this environment- something I probably wouldn’t be caught dead in if I were in the UK.

Thruth should be able to steer you towards good Filson tincloth outerwear.
Double tin and single tin cloth are a bitch to break in. Cold without layers - even with the zip in wool liner - but pretty element resistant in terms of shedding water and wind. Single tin cloth is a bit more robust than the beefier Barbour waxed cotton as it is waxed canvas. Shelter cloth is more akin to typical Barbour but they don't use it much anymore so you would have to buy vintage. Dry tin cloth is softer, no smell if that is a thing with you as it is with some others and no break-in.

At Filson's price points, there is better value out there. Vintage is always a way to go.
 

yeahokaywhatever

Active Member
Messages
43
When people talk about collar gapping, they’re talking about when someone’s arms are down right? How much gapping is acceptable when someone has their hands up? Or do people literally mean no gap in all positions?

Does having high and large armholes help?
 

Mattrick

Active Member
Messages
34
A quick but obscure question: I've always wondered why Tom Ford uses five buttons on the cuff of his jackets, with an oversized fifth button hole. Is there a significance to this beyond a vulgar "let's add one more as more is better"?

I haven't seen anyone else do it, except to extend a too-short sleeve which has functional buttons.
 

Great White Snark

Well-Known Member
Messages
464
I’m pretty sure you’ve answered your own question there. Attention seeking shit. Same as T and A with their pointless three or more button shirt cuffs.
 

Mattrick

Active Member
Messages
34
I assumed it was that, but considered that there could have been more to it. Like a style from the past that he was mimicking.

Frankly I'd feel like an idiot with five buttons - plus they're always functional and the sleeves are always long.
 

Untermensch

Well-Known Member
Messages
244
Anyone who can turn out a decent softish cut jacket, sub London prices, no garmsman coal-heaving nonsense?
Henry Herbert. They're in London but their prices are sub-London. One of their cutters is Italian (name of Francesco Vuoto), so you can knock yourself out with spalla camicias and mappinas.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom