Disagreeable Menswear Post Of The Day

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,011
LOL. Well put.
It is of course disposable income that counts when it comes to opportunities to go bespoke.

And one of life's lessons is that the more you earn, the more various entities from the government down to your family who come and take a slice of the action. Leaving you roughly the same pocket money you had in your mid-twenties, no matter how much you earn.

I think that this is what most people who follow lifestyle blogs are like. There's an awful lot of "aspiration" out there and in places like the US and Australia (and presumably the UK, too), pretty much everyone who is young and middle class assumes that they will be successful as they become older. Of course, the reality is sadly different...
In the rat race of career, one should never assume anything. Along with tenacity, skill and fire in your belly, you need a certain amount of luck.

In the UK youngsters have realised that their parents had better job prospects than them. Meanwhile the reality for us Old Age Pensioners is the free bus pass and the Winter Fuel Allowance.
There's other career opportunities now, some of them extremely well rewarded in comparison to the old world of the corporate man.

Which is my exactly percetion of most forum/instagram/... users . You have a few senior ones who dress for fun, but most are young social climbers from all kinds of middle to lower class backgrounds with business degrees . Crompton's audience is the same, not including those who are in "the business" in one form or another anyway. There might be a few senior followers but most will be you professionals looking to play old money and give of an air of sophistication and class.

I'm on friendly terms with a good dozen shop owners/brand owners/craftsmen in the upper end of the market and their experiences run contrary to what Crompton writes. Young customers? Hardly any if at all. It's the 60+ self-employed crowd that keeps them going, not even those working for large corporations or in the public sector. Same goes for trunk shows, all senior doctors/lawyers/entrepreneurs in one form or another. While there are young ones coming up most aren't exactly bulk buyers while they have a very theoretical idea of style, no matter if suits or shoes and treat most of this as a one off. One guy tried to cater to a younger crowd with young craftsmen while running more contermporary styles and designs. It turned out to be a massive loss while almost alienating the old customer base. This up and coming group of young proefessionals who have quality and tradition in mind is simply non-existant and an invention of marketing departments.
Pretty much the same here, of the very small niche of men's tailors here in the Netherlands all those places are frequented by a much older generation who have made their money, 60s plus. I'm nearly 50 and I would class myself as one of the younger customers. Never seen anyone younger than myself in any of these places. The exception are the ''modern'' tailors who cater for the footballers. They go to visit the footballer at their home with an option of several ''looks'' and they buy maybe a couple or more of them and its 15 grand thank you very much. Off-the-shelf stuff.
 

formby001

Well-Known Member
Messages
183
Mr Crompton seems to get a lot of free advertising.

...there's no such thing as bad publicity. How true.....

And, we now live in a shameless age.
 

doghouse

King Of The Elite Idiots
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
10,203
Hardly any if at all. It's the 60+ self-employed crowd that keeps them going, not even those working for large corporations or in the public sector. Same goes for trunk shows, all senior doctors/lawyers/entrepreneurs in one form or another.
While certainly the case in general, I know quite a few mid 30's and up clients I see at the trunk shows and shops. I fall into the self employed/ entrepreneur category, but only 40+ at the moment and I've been a customer since around 30.
 

Great White Snark

Well-Known Member
Messages
502
Izda Foosta no longa a customer of da bespock...?
Last I read he was cheerfully admitting that that the whole journey into bespoke was just a silly, expensive hobby of conceit, and he has now joined the ranks embracing the ‘Midtown uniform’. I still don’t know if that foreign chap who called him an “oval headed dwarf” ever delivered his ten pairs of trousers at a grand each or if they’re still lost in transit.
 

formby001

Well-Known Member
Messages
183
Last I read he was cheerfully admitting that that the whole journey into bespoke was just a silly, expensive hobby of conceit, and he has now joined the ranks embracing the ‘Midtown uniform’. I still don’t know if that foreign chap who called him an “oval headed dwarf” ever delivered his ten pairs of trousers at a grand each or if they’re still lost in transit.
Chuckle...

Well, sometimes lessons have to be learned the hard (& expensive) way I suppose.
 

doghouse

King Of The Elite Idiots
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
10,203
Last I read he was cheerfully admitting that that the whole journey into bespoke was just a silly, expensive hobby of conceit, and he has now joined the ranks embracing the ‘Midtown uniform’. I still don’t know if that foreign chap who called him an “oval headed dwarf” ever delivered his ten pairs of trousers at a grand each or if they’re still lost in transit.
Why haven't you been updating the What's New with the Foo thread for us
 

walker

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,543
Last I read he was cheerfully admitting that that the whole journey into bespoke was just a silly, expensive hobby of conceit, and he has now joined the ranks embracing the ‘Midtown uniform’.
at least, he obviously survives the GT3. well, a hobby, which buys you a lot of bespoke and of course he had the car bespoken for around 50k on top of the 200k price tag.

I love this kind of confessions. well done, the foo.
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,011
at least, he obviously survives the GT3. well, a hobby, which buys you a lot of bespoke and of course he had the car bespoken for around 50k on top of the 200k price tag.

I love this kind of confessions. well done, the foo.
It's great that he's being honest and has moved on up. Self-reflection, it's a good thing, but don't live there on the psychiatrists chaise lounge.

Onwards and upwards, never get trapped in the past!
 

aristoi bcn

Spanish Rookie
Messages
371
This is quite old but...

Why I hate this guy so much? Even more than Crompers.

Probably because he embraces all the igent trends like 2 years late and seems to suffer doing so?

Polish Alien.jpg


 
F

fuuzoku

Guest
he looks like a late developing, emaciated 16 year who has turned up to his 12 year old sister's birthday party looking to get lucky
 

walker

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,543
It's great that he's being honest and has moved on up. Self-reflection, it's a good thing, but don't live there on the psychiatrists chaise lounge.

Onwards and upwards, never get trapped in the past!
well, honest and foo don't bode well for me. while he isn't dishonest in the sense of the word, he is a lousy opportunist, who moves like a flag in the wind. he also pretends to be an expert in "all" aspects of life, particular luxury life. I would give manton some credit for foo's behaviour in this regard.

of course, you can do worse, as a lot of his bespoke orders happened in combination with nice holiday trips, so no harm, no foul.

is the chaise longue a reference to his exposure on his interior design ideas?
 

doghouse

King Of The Elite Idiots
Moderator
Supporter
Messages
10,203
It's dated extremely badly as you say. But you watch some other stuff from the same period Magnum and The Fall Guy, they're actually quite watchable.
So on a lark I went and watched the pilot of Miami Vice, and I have to say its probably the one of the least dated vintage shows I've ever come across, which is amazing given the costuming. The title sequence alone probably has more artistic value than any TV show airing currently.

I saw an episode of Magnum last week and honestly it might as well have been from the paleolithic era it was so dated.
 

Great White Snark

Well-Known Member
Messages
502
So on a lark I went and watched the pilot of Miami Vice, and I have to say its probably the one of the least dated vintage shows I've ever come across, which is amazing given the costuming. The title sequence alone probably has more artistic value than any TV show airing currently.

I saw an episode of Magnum last week and honestly it might as well have been from the paleolithic era it was so dated.
Check out Tom Selleck shilling for reverse mortgages on daytime telly ads to hook in all the gullible fossils. From the days playing the handsome and happy go lucky Magnum he hasn’t aged well and looks, speaks and acts like he too came from the Palaeolithic era!
 

Lobbster

Well-Known Member
Messages
108
Is Supreme still a thing? I thought this crap found it's rightul place in the garbage heap of clothing history.
 

The Shooman

A Pretty Face
Messages
2,305
No way, many people haven't got the memo, they still think expensive labels = prestige. Besides, even if they did get the memo and graduated to custom, would they have the nouse to be able to make it work, probably not in many cases.

Check out the background. A photoshopped private jet.
Fake rich.jpg
 
Last edited:

Lobbster

Well-Known Member
Messages
108
He's being called out in the comment section once again. He loves talking about sustainability and the environment while boasting about travelling the world over fucking clothes and inspiration for tattoos. Hats from Chicago, shirts from Naples, shoes from Tokyo. But it's sustainable because it lasts longer. He might question the business of travelling tailors and commend people to use what's local to them but that would probably be bad for business.

Britan's best and brightest. Oxford PPE, my ass. He's a fucking hypocrite and it really starts to show.
 

Scherensammler

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,534
He's a fucking hypocrite and it really starts to show.
He is starting to run out of things to promote.
So hopefully his website will die a slow death in the near future. Who in his right mind wants to dress like a homeless person and spend thousands of $ on it?
He might question the business of travelling tailors and commend people to use what's local to them
That model is actually far more sustainable and ecofriendly than customers from, say, the US travelling to the UK or Italy.
Especially compared to some twats travelling from Africa or the Middle East to have pictures taken at Pitti.
 

Lobbster

Well-Known Member
Messages
108
He is starting to run out of things to promote.
So hopefully his website will die a slow death in the near future. Who in his right mind wants to dress like a homeless person and spend thousands of $ on it?


That model is actually far more sustainable and ecofriendly than customers from, say, the US travelling to the UK or Italy.
Especially compared to some twats travelling from Africa or the Middle East to have pictures taken at Pitti.
This might sound true but flying suits and personnel back and forth for measuring and fitting simply isn't sustainable and eco friendly in any way, no matter how you look at it. There might be less pollution but it's still exactly that and that doesn't take the pollution into account that happens during the production and transport of the raw materials. So you're either eco friendly or not, there's little in-between.

I obviously don't want to stop tailors from doing business elsewhere but this shows what a hotbed environmentalism and climate change activism in combination with something obsolete like bespoke clothing is. This is way above Crompton's usual paygrade and he should keep his mouth shut on this. You'd think that someone with such a profound education would have more sense than to instrumentalize it for virtue signalling and self-congratulation.
 

Scherensammler

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,534
This might sound true but flying suits and personnel back and forth for measuring and fitting simply isn't sustainable and eco friendly in any way, no matter how you look at it.
Compared to RTW clothing, bespoke is a lot more eco-friendly and not obsolete at all. If only to preserve the age old techniques.
Australian/ NZ wool gets shipped to Italy or the UK and is turned into cloths and bespoke garments.
Cotton, for example, gets shipped around the world to the poorest and cheapest labour countries to get processed, only to be turned into throw away clothing items in one of those countries and getting shipped around the world again.
 

Untermensch

Well-Known Member
Messages
299
Define "sustainable". Is it the new word for what we used to call eco-friendly in the 1990s?

If so, nothing is sustainable, not even a loin cloth made out of fig leaves. You'd have to grow enough fig trees for 8 billion + people multiplied by the number of fig leaves they'd need throughout their lifespan, which isn't sustainable. Where would you grow them? Would you replace other, more eco-friendly crops with a higher calorie content which could otherwise feed the world's hungry masses? Fig trees need a lot of water. Where would you get that? Would you let the starving masses go thirsty? Sustainable. Crompers is talking out of his arse. Nothing is sustainable any more.
 

Journeyman

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Messages
3,337
If so, nothing is sustainable, not even a loin cloth made out of fig leaves.
This is true, but surely there are degrees of sustainability?

On the one hand, we have a culture of buying something that is cheaply made on the far side of the world and then trashing it after one or two wears. On the other hand, we have a culture of having a (hopefully) small selection of clothes that are made locally, that we can wear for years or even decades.

Certainly, the latter involves some environmental costs but they're significantly less than the first option.
 

Untermensch

Well-Known Member
Messages
299
This is true, but surely there are degrees of sustainability?

On the one hand, we have a culture of buying something that is cheaply made on the far side of the world and then trashing it after one or two wears. On the other hand, we have a culture of having a (hopefully) small selection of clothes that are made locally, that we can wear for years or even decades.

Certainly, the latter involves some environmental costs but they're significantly less than the first option.
The trouble isn't how to make something sustainable. Is what sustainable really means in the first place. What's wrong with calling it "minimum waste", or "durable", or "local", like we did until the 1990s?

If you mean durable items, then you're perfectly right. Items that last longer are less likely to end up in the rubbish heap, and we make make fewer of them because people don't need to keep buying to replace worn-out stuff.

But no. That's not sophisticated enough. We have to attach a snazzy label and call it "sustainable", and give it that insidious veneer of virtue-signalling. Look! Here's a SUSTAINABLE T-SHIRT! I am a cutting-edge uber-minimalist designer! I MAKE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.

Load of bollocks, the whole lot of them. Crompton alone has a bloated wardrobe that could clothe a hundred men. How is that sustainable? Only fifty sheep were slaughtered in the making of this movie. Only five hectares of land were turned into desert in the making of this shirt.

Menswear has disappeared up its own arse. This is the man, if you please, who lines surplus vintage combat jackets with real fur.
 

Great White Snark

Well-Known Member
Messages
502
The trouble isn't how to make something sustainable. Is what sustainable really means in the first place. What's wrong with calling it "minimum waste", or "durable", or "local", like we did until the 1990s?

If you mean durable items, then you're perfectly right. Items that last longer are less likely to end up in the rubbish heap, and we make make fewer of them because people don't need to keep buying to replace worn-out stuff.

But no. That's not sophisticated enough. We have to attach a snazzy label and call it "sustainable", and give it that insidious veneer of virtue-signalling. Look! Here's a SUSTAINABLE T-SHIRT! I am a cutting-edge uber-minimalist designer! I MAKE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.

Load of bollocks, the whole lot of them. Crompton alone has a bloated wardrobe that could clothe a hundred men. How is that sustainable? Only fifty sheep were slaughtered in the making of this movie. Only five hectares of land were turned into desert in the making of this shirt.

Menswear has disappeared up its own arse. This is the man, if you please, who lines surplus vintage combat jackets with real fur.
What an excellent post. Succinct and incisive. You’ve absolutely nailed that bloody pompous charlatan!
 

Pimpernel Smith

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,011
The trouble isn't how to make something sustainable. Is what sustainable really means in the first place. What's wrong with calling it "minimum waste", or "durable", or "local", like we did until the 1990s?

If you mean durable items, then you're perfectly right. Items that last longer are less likely to end up in the rubbish heap, and we make make fewer of them because people don't need to keep buying to replace worn-out stuff.

But no. That's not sophisticated enough. We have to attach a snazzy label and call it "sustainable", and give it that insidious veneer of virtue-signalling. Look! Here's a SUSTAINABLE T-SHIRT! I am a cutting-edge uber-minimalist designer! I MAKE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.

Load of bollocks, the whole lot of them. Crompton alone has a bloated wardrobe that could clothe a hundred men. How is that sustainable? Only fifty sheep were slaughtered in the making of this movie. Only five hectares of land were turned into desert in the making of this shirt.

Menswear has disappeared up its own arse. This is the man, if you please, who lines surplus vintage combat jackets with real fur.
It's all buzz words in the land of the woke. In the future, it will all sound rather dated and contrived.

Mother Nature is a resilient being, I find it hard to believe the arrogance that clothing is somehow impacting the planet and that a cheap jacket is somehow not as environmentally friendly as going 7 grand bespoke. On the scale of things, the impact is zero.

We're getting a taste now with the coronavirus, unless it is indeed man-made, that nature really isn't that bothered or subservient to mankind. It owns us and will make us buckle.

We haven't escaped the limits of carbon based life forms, or something greater than ourselves. Thank god for that!
 
Top Bottom