The All-Inclusive Shoe & Boot Thread

Journeyman

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I'm not so keen on the styles of some of the shoes from this brand, but this is an interesting video showing the way the pattern is created and cut and how the shoe is then made:

 

shookt

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I'm not so keen on the styles of some of the shoes from this brand, but this is an interesting video showing the way the pattern is created and cut and how the shoe is then made:

I've seen them on instagram a couple of times - looks like the company is based in the US but I wonder where the shoes are made? Didn't quite realize that they handwelted their shoes - interesting.

In other news, I can safely say that my pair from Attila are well and truly broken in! Was just thinking how exceptionally comfortable and well fitted they are as I waited for lunch. Can't wait for my next pair from them.

2019-07-08 13.04.06.jpg
 

The Shooman

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Hey The Shooman. Was in Milano this week and made a short stop, at Silvano Lattanzi.

it's been a dream to see Lattanzi in the flesh and even own a pair. Interesting how the black pair are in polished cobbler leather (like a grain corrected).

If l bought a pair i'd want a real ltalian classic in tan or light brown like these or something like a half brogue oxford in bandaid tan. . lattanzi 3.jpg Silvano Lattanzi 6.jpg
 

The Shooman

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These cobblers touched on a crucial point why black stitched shoos are an inferior construction to goodyear. Why? It is because it is much more difficult to restitch in the same holes with blake construction, therefore the upper and insole can get mashed up pretty quickly. Those cheap constructions always compromise the integrity of the shoe when being resoled.
Cobblers Discuss Blake Stitch vs Goodyear Welted Shoes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAznPm2pW7Q
 

Kingstonian

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Was in Northampton for a family wedding so I popped along to Crockett and Jones factory shop. However it was closed until Augest(sic)16 for the holidays. I then went to Trickers whose shop was open though the factory is closed until August 12. The helpful chap who used to run it has now retired but there was a pleasant salesman in his place. Shoes for £195. Boots £250. I don’t really need more boots/shoes but they had a few that were nice. Robert Tramper was in cavalry calf though(corrected grain) mine are cordovan.

My sister thinks Northampton has gone downhill. No more Marks and Spencer. No BHS. The market not as busy as it was or open every day. I still enjoy it though. It still has a proud history of making stuff. Couple of pints of Harviestoun Schiehallion craft lager then headed home.
 

The Shooman

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Was very tempted to do something l have never done before, buy some shoes on ebay. I haven't bought them so far, but l nearly did.

$1,000 off on these G&G deco. Close to perfect, but the medallion isn't quite graceful enough. They would have fit, but if l am buying shoes l want them to be perfect.
Gaziano & Girling deco - Green 1.jpg Gaziano & Girling deco - Green 2.jpg

These Lattanzi were also very tempting. Real shoos, and something truly at my level. A great price on these and a good return policy if they didn't fit. New.
Lattanzi - $600.jpg
 

The Shooman

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There is a new comer to shoos called `the elegant oxford'. His antiquing jobs are the best l have seen from an amateur, but he is still typical of shoo-gents in that he lacks an eye for artistry.

His antique jobs:
Elegant oxford antiquing 1.jpg Elegant oxford antiquing 2.jpg

The biggest issues are these:
1). he antiques shoes of a casual nature (see tan AE above)
2). he antiques shoes from manufactures where antiquing does suit the shoe...eg, AE shoes with 360 degree welts (see tan AE above)
3). he high shines casual shoes
4). he puts white topies (rubber bottoms) on tan shoes instead of trying to match the topy to the edge dressing colour. (very odd)


A nice job below:
Elegant oxford antiquing 3.jpg
 

Enrile

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Hello, I found this forum and I found it interesting. After introducing myself Rambo has encouraged me to present some of my work, how can you see i'm leather craft and shoemaker

www.enrile.es

and I also leave an interesting video about our watch strap manufacturing.

Best regards
Enrile
 

The Shooman

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Hello, I found this forum and I found it interesting. After introducing myself Rambo has encouraged me to present some of my work, how can you see i'm leather craft and shoemaker

www.enrile.es

and I also leave an interesting video about our watch strap manufacturing.

Best regards
Enrile
Thanks for the links.

Nice traditional looking shoes that are very well made. Can you do made-to-measure where you alter the stock last?

I notice your lasts have a lot of volume in them. Where do you source your lasts from?

It's also interesting how some of your shoes have close cut waists. How many years have you been doing close cut waists for, and what inspired you to do close cut waists? Also, how long have you been a cordwainer for?
 

Dropbear

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For those encouraging me to hang up the boots and get some loafers for summer and dressier wear, how about these? Not suede but a good price. Listed as being oxblood, though pic looks black:
9700320C-7B28-4356-830D-7F9B292E7A22.jpeg


And The Shooman, what do you think of nailed RMWs? The profile seems a little sleeker, but are they really that much better or just another niche iGent fad?
EBA86A4D-826C-40B7-9C5C-BE8E3ECB6FC9.png
 

Journeyman

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^Loafers might be better in smooth calf, shell cordovan or the iGent favourite, suede. Might also be better in a slightly lighter colour.

Do the RMs have nailed, or screwed, soles?

A friend of mine has a pair of RMs with screwed soles, and he said that they're nice and sleek. However, the downside is that the boots have more nicks and scratches because the sole is closer to the upper and so it's easier to bump or scratch the upper.
 

Enrile

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Thanks for the links.

Nice traditional looking shoes that are very well made. Can you do made-to-measure where you alter the stock last?

I notice your lasts have a lot of volume in them. Where do you source your lasts from?

It's also interesting how some of your shoes have close cut waists. How many years have you been doing close cut waists for, and what inspired you to do close cut waists? Also, how long have you been a cordwainer for?
Thanks very much.
I started with shoes ten or eleven years ago. For some time I only made bespoke, my lasts are taken from that time and you can find more or less wide lasts, because I have three wide deferents per model. I never do bespoke anymore, we only do MTO therefore there is no stock. The customer chooses, last model, details, leather, soles, seams ....

I know goodyear construction very well, because during my early years I only did goodyear. For several years now I only do handwelted, there really is no comparison between the two methods.

I have read many criticisms of this net, especially for the deterioration of the canvas of the gems, but there are many other critical points (plant, stops, buttresses, cuts attached to canvases ...). All this seems that nobody takes it into account. Goodyear popularized the price of a worthy shoe, but it can never be compared to a handwelt shoe.

my violin waist inspiration is given by an old pair of boots made in my city over 100 years ago. I started doing it just a year ago.
 

The Shooman

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For those encouraging me to hang up the boots and get some loafers for summer and dressier wear, how about these? Not suede but a good price. Listed as being oxblood, though pic looks black:
View attachment 32447
They could be o.k, but keep looking for navy suede loafers and some tan loafers. I want you to up the game and do it right.

Dropbear said:
And The Shooman, what do you think of nailed RMWs? The profile seems a little sleeker, but are they really that much better or just another niche iGent fad?View attachment 32446
Brass screwed construction is no good, it has a major construction fault and you would be better off with goodyear welted.

Brass screwed is a cheap machine construction of the worst kind, the construction is just brutal and cheap. It rips up that insole like nothing else, and long before the life of the boot is over you may find they will start taking water into the shoes on a wet day. To add to this, the construction weakness will mean that a complete new rebuild will need to be done, but the issue with this is that the uppers will eventually get mashed more and more, and eventually rebuilds won't be possible because the upper that joins to the sole will be obliterated.

I would even argue that brass screwed is worse than blake construction. Why? Because at least a blake shoe can be topied and stopped from needing resoles, where-as regardless of whether a brass screwed boot is topied, the life is still going to be limited (construction wise) because that insole is going to be ripped up due to the brass nails being squeezed by the insole with each role of the foot, and before too long holes start to appear, and the numerous rebuilds that would be required is going to ruin the upper until it can't be repaired anymore.

See....these are cheap and nasty machine constructions where they don't use a rand or welt, they are the worst types because uppers get damaged during resoles, but with the brass screwed construction you get the double whammy...you get permanent upper damage and you also get insole damage. It is as crude as it gets with no welt or anything, just cheap and nasty.

A proper executed pegged shoe is going to be hand welted and is going to be wood pegged in from the edge of the shoe. In this way the upper is never going to be damaged and the integrity of the construction will forever be preserved. Eventhough the wood pegs will always damage the insoles, the HAND welt will always ensure a lifelong construction IF the wood pegging is done properly. Insoles are easily replaced when a hand welted construction is done, so no big deal, but this is NOT the case with cheap brass screwed construction.

Don't listen to those pesky igents, they say silly things.
 
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The Shooman

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I have read many criticisms of this net, especially for the deterioration of the canvas of the gems, but there are many other critical points (plant, stops, buttresses, cuts attached to canvases ...). All this seems that nobody takes it into account.
Would you like to tell us more about these other critical points in simple language so we can all understand?


Enrile said:
Goodyear popularized the price of a worthy shoe, but it can never be compared to a handwelt shoe.
The hand welted construction is perfection, it solves all the problems in shoe construction. It preserves the integrity of the construction like nothing else can. It's amazing how a strip of leather stitched to an insole by hand can create a perfect construction...so simple yet so brilliant!

Enrile said:
my violin waist inspiration is given by an old pair of boots made in my city over 100 years ago. I started doing it just a year ago.
Very interesting. I thought you may have gotten recent inspiration by looking at French and English bespoke shoes online, so hearing that you got inspiration from a pair of 100 year old boots is a great delight to read.

Are the waists wood pegged or stitched?
 

Enrile

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At that time the violin waist was not spike, rather round.
 

Enrile

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Regarding critical points, everyone gives much importance to gems. In any industrial construction the hurry intervenes, therefore the hidden materials used must form and harden very quickly.
The strong tip is made of synthetic material, just like the buttress.
when you do this with real leather, it is done with water and bumps, this takes time and expertise .... however it allows good perspiration and some deformation when wearing shoes, which is certainly more comfortable.
the upper glued on canvas, to try to match in resistance and tension all the used leather, since a machine will probably stretch the shoe on the last.

The hole that remains under the gem is 6 to 8mm. Cork stuffing at best. With use it sinks and the shoe seems to get much bigger.

That said, I must also argue that goodyear in general has a price for what you get, and this is enough for most people.
 

The Shooman

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Regarding critical points, everyone gives much importance to gems. In any industrial construction the hurry intervenes, therefore the hidden materials used must form and harden very quickly.
The strong tip is made of synthetic material, just like the buttress.
when you do this with real leather, it is done with water and bumps, this takes time and expertise .... however it allows good perspiration and some deformation when wearing shoes, which is certainly more comfortable.
completely agree, all good points.


Enrile said:
The hole that remains under the gem is 6 to 8mm. Cork stuffing at best. With use it sinks and the shoe seems to get much bigger.
That is a really good point, and especially with some shoes where the cork is completely shifted under the ball of the foot.

What do you use as filler?

Enrile said:
That said, I must also argue that goodyear in general has a price for what you get, and this is enough for most people.
Yes, most people have no experience in really good shoes, and they don't understand the importance of good shoes and the corners usually cut in making shoes, so they are easily satisfied.
 

Enrile

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[QUOTE = "The Shooman, publicación: 233193, miembro: 616"]
completamente de acuerdo, todos los buenos puntos.




Ese es un punto realmente bueno, y especialmente con algunos zapatos donde el corcho se mueve completamente debajo de la punta del pie.

¿Qué utilizas como relleno?

Yo uso corcho natural, no pasta de corcho. También he usado fieltro de lana ... de todos modos, la cavidad que se crea al hacer la pluma tallada es muy pequeña y es por eso. o hay mucho que llenar y no se hunde

Sí, la mayoría de las personas no tienen experiencia en zapatos realmente buenos, y no entienden la importancia de los zapatos buenos y las esquinas generalmente cortadas para hacer zapatos, por lo que se satisfacen fácilmente.
[/CITAR]
 

Dropbear

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I’m kinda taken by that RMW Lachlan boot: the sleek chisel toe of the Craftsman with the sole of the Gardner. Looks ideal for casual weekend wear and travel - something I could wear hiking around city streets.

But holy crap the prices! It looks like Louis Vuitton has jacked ALL the prices up from 300 to $500 and the usual Aussie retailers can’t sell any cheaper. Hugh Jackman should be fixing the prices instead of shilling for an overpriced riding and work boot.
 
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The Shooman

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I just checked the RMW prices and l am shocked. I hear they are trying to make RMW a luxury retailer, so l suppose people are willing to pay $600 for boots these days. Besides, many goodyear shoes are in that price range and above now. Just think yourself lucky the prices aren't even higher.

$600 for a shoo meant something 25 years ago, but these days it is nothing. Even blokes who aren't shoomen buy $600 boots these days. Plenty of tom dick and harry types in shoes costing hundreds these days.
 

The Shooman

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Testing a pic from my phone. Colour looks beautiful on phone but terrible on computer screen.

20190831_152535.jpg


This is such an awesome derby. Had it on yesterday, and was really nice to dress so casual with jeans. Haven't worn jeans in years, but it was nice to rough about in them.
20190831_151340.jpg
 
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Dropbear

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I’m getting my mum in Aus to hassle customer service to give me the true width of these Blundies, to see if they will work for me:
DA9FDC90-8D65-42F8-9C46-CF8BDC36D5F0.png
 

The Shooman

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Found this new youtube channel focused on stripping down shoes and evaluating construction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZk9pfucVO4

Here they reveal that Tod's loafers ($5-600) have plastic heel blocks hah.
Yes, l watch that channel too, and yes many shoes costing well over $500 use cheap materials, especially in the heel. Then again, the old Florsheim Imperial v cleat shoes that everyone raves about used plastic heels under the top lift for decades since the 50's or 60's, and that is probably why they used all those metal slugs in the top lift, because a few nails and glue would not have been enough to hold everything together. Lots of shoes also have cheap insoles and cardboard heels, and that includes Allen Edmonds and Alden.

These shoos below are from the 1950's, and yet they have a plastic heel too. Double stitched soles. A great fitting shoe with lots of curving and arch support in the insole which makes it fit differently to any rtw shoo these days.
Todays shoos 165.jpg
 
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