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Journeyman

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Depends on how big or small you are and the width of your lapels. Tie and lapels should be close in width. Not exactly the same is fine. quarter inch +/-

3 inches is on the slim side for regular folks unless you are an Ivy acolyte where you might select a 2 7/8 (check out Ask Andy and some of the specific widths quoted) or a 3, "although Drakes is flogging 7cm ties which tie makers will cheat up and call a 3" inch tie. 3.25" (8cm) is skinny for some but Brooks Brothers classic lapels match this. 3.5" - 3.75" is iGent comfort zone. 9 to 9.5 cm.
Great post by Thruth Thruth .

I'm 6", wear a 44" jacket and prefer reasonably wide lapels. I also prefer a tie that's 3.5 - 3.75" in width as otherwise I find they just look too narrow in comparison to my lapels and my general width.

There certainly are bespoke tie makers - some dodgy, some not.

For good off-the-rack ties that are decently wide, try E. Marinella or E.G. Capelli. Capelli has an online store and as well as off-the-rack, I think he will also customise ties on request:
https://www.patriziocappelli.it/

I don't know whether they still do, but Brooks Brothers used to make good ties that were a decent width, all made in their factory in New York. You can often pick them up on eBay cheaply.

Vanda do both off-the-rack ties and made-to-order ties - as they only make the tie when you order, you can request a specific length and width. Note that Vanda prefer a thin lining and no back "keeper" - some people like that, some don't. They do tie a fantastic knot.
http://vandafineclothing.com/

Sam Hober makes only made-to-order ties and has a good reputation.
https://www.samhober.com/ties/ties.htm
 

Untermensch

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Great post by Thruth Thruth .

I'm 6", wear a 44" jacket and prefer reasonably wide lapels. I also prefer a tie that's 3.5 - 3.75" in width as otherwise I find they just look too narrow in comparison to my lapels and my general width.

There certainly are bespoke tie makers - some dodgy, some not.

For good off-the-rack ties that are decently wide, try E. Marinella or E.G. Capelli. Capelli has an online store and as well as off-the-rack, I think he will also customise ties on request:
https://www.patriziocappelli.it/

I don't know whether they still do, but Brooks Brothers used to make good ties that were a decent width, all made in their factory in New York. You can often pick them up on eBay cheaply.

Vanda do both off-the-rack ties and made-to-order ties - as they only make the tie when you order, you can request a specific length and width. Note that Vanda prefer a thin lining and no back "keeper" - some people like that, some don't. They do tie a fantastic knot.
http://vandafineclothing.com/

Sam Hober makes only made-to-order ties and has a good reputation.
https://www.samhober.com/ties/ties.htm
Try Embassy of Elegance. They do a bespoke tie option, which costs exactly the same as their RTW offer. They're produced in Poland (coal miners etc.). If you're in the US or Australia, shipping might push up the price.

https://embassyofelegance.com
 

Noob

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I've bought a bunch of stuff from Luxeswap and been very happy. Have not sold anything through him.

He's skilled at creating demand among a certain group of sf.com lemmimgs.
 

Journeyman

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Are seven-fold ties any better?
Some people get excited over seven-fold ties because they use more silk and are, for want of a better word, more exotic than your regular "four fold" tie.

Ultimately, it comes down to how the tie is made. I have a few Bulgari ties that are only made from one piece of printed silk, folded seven or eight time, with no interlining. They are very nice and tie fantastic knots. However, I've seen some seven-fold ties that are awkward - they knots are either too bulky, or too small (although, of course, such things are subjective).
 

Journeyman

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Button-down collars work well on all sorts of fabrics - but I just don't like twill shirts.

In fact, I don't like twill anything, apart from denim jeans.
 

Journeyman

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If you can find a pair of trousers with a high rise and no belt loops, then it should look fine. Plain or simple braces are best, otherwise they tend to clash with the rest of the outfit.

I don't know whether RL Polo still sells trousers cut for braces but back when Corneliani was making their business trousers and suits, they had a model that was perfect for braces - side adjusters, high waistband, a "hidden" waistband closure (ie no visible button or clip), and deep, forward pleats.
 
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If you can find a pair of trousers with a high rise and no belt loops, then it should look fine. Plain or simple braces are best, otherwise they tend to clash with the rest of the outfit.

I don't know whether RL Polo still sells trousers cut for braces but back when Corneliani was making their business trousers and suits, they had a model that was perfect for braces - side adjusters, high waistband, a "hidden" waistband closure (ie no visible button or clip), and deep, forward pleats.
What do forward pleats help with with regard to suspenders?
 

Journeyman

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I don't think that the pleats necessarily help, although perhaps someone with more knowledge of tailoring/clothing design can chime in.

However, I think that the combination of higher-waisted trousers (which are best-suited to braces) and the pleats (either forward or reverse) help to create a pleasing line/shape in the trousers. Hence, it does seem to be more common to have pleats on higher-waisted trousers that are made to be worn with braces.
 
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I don't think that the pleats necessarily help, although perhaps someone with more knowledge of tailoring/clothing design can chime in.

However, I think that the combination of higher-waisted trousers (which are best-suited to braces) and the pleats (either forward or reverse) help to create a pleasing line/shape in the trousers. Hence, it does seem to be more common to have pleats on higher-waisted trousers that are made to be worn with braces.
Do you always cuff your pleated trousers?
 

Journeyman

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I cuff all my trousers, pleated and flat-front, with the exception of cotton chino pants.

I do have some cotton trousers with cuffs, but I don't cuff the more casual chinos.
 

fxh

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I don't cuff anything. (Well except jeans always - unless stacking)
I've tried it on a few chinos, still have a few pairs, and a suit I had made but didn't feel comfortable, so after few months I took the suit back and had them removed. In the 80's I had a bit of two pleats and cuffs. Now its all flat front.

I've seen cuffs on others, and some, not all by any means, looked fine.

Mostly clothing isn't all science but sometimes it is art and for me just feeling comfortable in my skin and not caring too much about what others think especially about details. Broad impressions/big canvas - sure I care what others think.
 

Untermensch

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What do forward pleats help with with regard to suspenders?
They do, but in a roundabout way. Braces (suspenders are for wymmyn) require high- or higher-waisted trousers. The waist at that height should be smaller than the "waist" lower down near the hips (which is where most trousers sit nowadays). The pleats help to make a smooth transition from a narrow waist to the fullness of the legs. Of course with braces you need the waist to be just a touch looser. Helps the trews hang better.
 

fxh

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My experience from a long time in dressing people and obsessive observation is that over 6’ skinny blokes do well in cuffs and almost ANY stocky well set solid bloke needs to look as if they are on a solid foundation.

That means no dainty flat shoes or slim loafers etc. Chunky shoes, thicker socks and cuffs all give that look of standing on a solid foundation. Slightly wider leg openings are important too. Solid blokes in too narrow trousers, and slim dainty shoes, look unbalanced and out of whack. Like a carrot in ballet tights and flats.
 
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QuandoDio

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What’s the usual shrinkage on 100% linen trousers compared to cotton?
Compared to cotton? Well, I'd just compare it to wool.

Since i dry-clean my wool trousers: zero shrinkage.

Cotton: about .25 -5" extra length in inseam to compensate for machine shrinkage.

Linen - about .5- 0.75 extra length in inseam to compensate for machine shrinkage.

Method seems to generally work for me but ofc fabric/ trimmings may affect things. YMMV.
 

Dropbear

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Thanks!

Follow-on question:

How many machine washes to achieve shrink?

I have three pairs of new linen trousers trousers, one cotton and one denim that all need hemming. I’ll give them all a warm wash and dry beforehand but will one cycle be enough?
 

Great White Snark

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Thanks!

Follow-on question:

How many machine washes to achieve shrink?

I have three pairs of new linen trousers trousers, one cotton and one denim that all need hemming. I’ll give them all a warm wash and dry beforehand but will one cycle be enough?
I would give them one warm wash as you say and then hem them. Cold wash only from that point on and line dry. That’s what I do.
My problem with linen is not so much the shrinkage from washing it’s the wrinkles which can cause jacket sleeves and trouser lengths to look short when that’s only the result of the concertina effect over the day at the elbows and knees. Can’t really be helped so the answer is to have a looser fit and not try to tailor linen within an inch of its life as it will never work out. It’s supposed to be for hot weather so who wants close fitting tailored clothes in the heat anyway?
 

fxh

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Strangely denim will shrink most length wise. But it also eventually stretches around waist. Depends too if it’s sanforised or not. You might think of hemming denim a bit long, after all you will be folding, cuffing or rolling or stacking won’t you!!!! You don’t wear jeans like dress trousers. Anyway if you do them a bit long after a few months and washes you can rehem shorter.
 
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